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Old Jun 19, 2008, 8:05 AM   #1
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A friendprinted small b&W grayscales ona Canon 1860 using Canon, Kodak and a few off brand papers.He got a slight magenta cast in the prints even after turning off the auto color and manually turning down the magenta slider in the preferences box. We tried matte paper and the problem disappeared. It doesn't seem to matter which brand matte paper is used. We tried several and the matte always has truer grays than glossy. Has anyone had similar experience? There must be something in the gloss coating chemistry that turns the black/gray to magenta.
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Old Jun 19, 2008, 11:38 AM   #2
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Paper and ink chemistry work hand in hand. You have to match each to the other to get proper prints. This is what "profiling" is about. By manually manipulating colors as you are trying to do is nearly impossible. When you get the proper "profile" for the ink-paper combination you are using, the magenta cast will not appear.

There are devices and software that you can use to do the profiling (varies from $100 to $250 to well over a $1000) or you can contact an organization that does this for you (varies from about $30 to $60 per profile).

Trying to guess, as you are attempting to do, will waste a lot of ink and paper and become vary frustrating. Remember, each different combination of paper (manufacturerer, gloss level ,etc.) and ink will give different results.


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Old Jun 19, 2008, 12:51 PM   #3
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I understand your points Gritty. Profiling is important with color prints on various papers because color inks look different on different finishes. What I don't understand is the need to profile black ink! When you turn off the colors, the only cartridges putting out ink are the black ones (the i860 has 2, one for text and one for photos). Black is black. I think the only place the magenta can come from isan interaction between the black ink and the gloss coating. We did not get a magenta cast on any matte papers we tried - Epson, Canon or Kodak -and the only profiling we did was to set the paper type to matte. The magenta cst appeared on glossy Canon, Kodak and a brand x photo paper from a local store.
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Old Feb 20, 2009, 7:06 AM   #4
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ADSchiller wrote:
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I understand your points Gritty. Profiling is important with color prints on various papers because color inks look different on different finishes. *What I don't understand is the need to profile black ink! ...
Think of it this way: Color is link trying to stand a nickle on its edge; it takes care but isn't all that difficult. B&W, done with color inks, is like trying to balance a knife on its edge; the slightest error results in failure.

Some color printers are made with an eye to printing B&W. This generally involves special inks with more than one black. Sometimes these require a certain range of papers and outside that range they revert to simulating the B&W with color inks because of paper compatibility problems.

My old HP 1220ce could never quite be forced into producing a good neutral B&W image. I found that intentionally tinting the B&W image a slightly warm tone in Photoshop left the printers "error" on the warm side which is quite acceptable. Traditional B&W papers were often very slightly warm and/or olive in tone.

My new HP B9180 has been able to deliver good neutral B&W prints on the range of papers that I've fead it.
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Old Jun 18, 2009, 11:41 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by ADSchiller View Post
Black is black. I think the only place the magenta can come from isan interaction between the black ink and the gloss coating.
Unless you checked a box in the printer driver marked 'black ink only' or similar, the printer will use the CMY inks to create greyscale images. Getting good B&W from color printers can be a challenge, as the ink mix shows differently on different papers, and sometimes even changing a cartridge will induce a color cast, or change an existing cast.
I use my Epson R1800 for color, at which it is excellent, but the driver doesn't have a black only option, so I use another printer for B&W.

brian
edit: Didn't see that the first post is a year old. Pardon me.

Last edited by VTphotog; Jun 18, 2009 at 11:43 PM.
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