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Old May 4, 2006, 4:25 PM   #1
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I have sent some images by email to a magazine and they want to publish a couple of images, but they have asked if they could be of higher resolution does this mean going to 300 instead of 72? the images are 2185x1769 at 611kb and they have asked them to be sent at 1-2mb, this also confuses me. The camera used is a Canon 20D. (if that helps).
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Old May 4, 2006, 10:36 PM   #2
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Hopefully, someone with magazine publishing experience will respond to this, but until then...

Yes, you should send them a 300ppi resolution (or whatever they specify) file. You may have to convert the file to the CMYK color space (the offset printing standard) instead of RGB and in TIFF format instead of JPEG.

The only bugger here is that TIFF (a universal, high-quality industry standard format) would probably be more than 1-2 MB. Is the 611 kb file size you mentioned compressed more than the original file? If it is and they will take a JPEG, all you need do is send them a less-compressed JPEG file to fall into the 1-2 MB range.

If you are not sure of exactly what they want from you, ask them to clarify their wishes. They will be more impressed with you if you ask them questions that will allow you to provide them with what they want than if you just guess out of fear of looking inexperienced and give them something other than what they want.

Don't take my advice about the particulars. Use them as a starting point when you ask these guys exactly what they're after.

Good luck!

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Old May 5, 2006, 2:15 AM   #3
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Many thanks Grant for advice on this its really made things clearer. I am going to do as you advised and ask them what format they want them saved in as they had not stated this, and as you guessed right i didnt want to seem a bit of a dummy having to ask them, but your right thinking on it asking will be the best road to take. regards.
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Old May 5, 2006, 12:14 PM   #4
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If they want an image that size limited to 2Mb they have to be asking for a JPG. A TIFF of a 2185x1769 pixel image would be over 10Mb. There are other uncompressed formats that will get you down to maybe 6 or 7Mb, but JPG is the highest quality image you can compress to 2Mb.

If you ended up with 611k you used a lower quality compression. They might be asking for a higher quality JPG. Tell us what editor or viewer you are using to save the image and someone can give you more exact instructions of how to do that. In Photoshop you can just keep increasing the quality until the file size at the bottom of the save box shows 2Mb. Some others you have to experiment more as the save box doesn't reflect the file size when you select quality.

A 2185x1769 pixel image at 72PPI is exactly the same image as a 2185x1769 image at 300 PPI. Unless they have given you a final print size they want, the PPI is immaterial.

If by resolution they mean they want more than 2185 X 1769 pixels you would have to use a lower quality compression. If you originally took the image at 2185 X 1769 it won't do any good to upsample it yourself compared to their doing it after they get the photos. That would just require a lower quality compression if you upsampled it before sending and would result in lower quality compared to them doing the upsample after receiving it. If they are asking for more pixels tell them that is the full size of the image and buy a larger memory card for future images.

Since they seem to be asking for a JPG (as it is the only file type that will fit their file size restriction) you can just leave it in RGB. They will convert it to CYMK in their equipment during layout.


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Old May 6, 2006, 6:11 AM   #5
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Many thanks for your help, i usually use photoshop CS2 and have quality box on max (12) but i have another software that i have been trying as it was a freebie from Digital magazine called "Visualiser Photo resize" i have the aspect ratio on "standard" and the Jpeg compression dial on 70, perhaps this where i am going wrong, I hopethese details will help you more. regards Bev.
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Old May 30, 2006, 7:11 AM   #6
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Maybe this article will help you
http://www.freeimagebrowser.com/foru...-i-choose.html

If you need high quality prints that needs to be printed into a magazine, you need to use a high DPI setting. I use Visualizer Photo Studio all the time for web albums and protected slideshow presentations (it's the payware version of Visualiser Photo Resize, which you are using). None of these are made for high DPI settings (at least not that I know of). Use PS for prints and your Visualizer product for the web, thats what I do
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Old May 30, 2006, 7:20 AM   #7
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I forgot to mention, save your photo as PDF and send it to the printers - they usually prefer this format.
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Old Jun 2, 2006, 3:59 PM   #8
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Thanks Digital, appreciated.
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Old Jul 11, 2006, 1:51 PM   #9
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i see this discussion a lot. a couple of things need to be clarified.

first off, make sure you understand the difference between DPI and PPI. DPI is a printer setting that has nothing to do with camera or image resolution. it's simply the number of dots of ink the printer is capable of placing in every inch of paper. PPI is a camera/image resolution, equal to the number of pixels per inch in the original image. you can print a 2MP image at 300DPI, and while it will still be a 2MP image, it will print fairly well. conversely, you can print an 8MP file at 72DPI, and it will lookhorrible.

most printer/publishers say 300 DPI because that's kind of the industry gold standard for photo printing, but in terms of pixels, anything more than about 200-250 PPI is wasted, because the human eye cannot resolve detail finely enough to tell the difference. you'd need to increase PPI count by about 25% or more in each dimension before you could really see the difference. for instance, you could probablytell the difference between, say, a 5Mp image and an 8Mp image at the same print size, but not between a 5 and a 6. also, there's no law that says that one dot of ink has to equal on pixel. it's perfecly okay to uset 2, 3 or even 5 dots of ink to make up one pixel. where you run into trouble with prints is when that relationship gets turned around, and you have multiple pixels per inch- and hence, more possible colors - than you have printer dots per inch. that can lead to fuzzy prints, or worse yet, "jaggies"...

the other thing to remember is that print resolution is totally dependent on print size. a 5Mp file may look wonderful printed at 8x10, or even 11x14, but begins to look pixelated at 16x20. you need to learn what print size they'll be using, and set your image resolution accordingly. if they're printing the pics in something close to 8x10 size, a 2185x1769 pixel image would yield a bit over 200 PPI in each dimension, certainly very acceptable for a good print. if they want 300 PPI, you'd need to upsample that image considerably, to about 3000x2400. but interpolation causes some loss of sharpness, and the more you up-size a photo, the more clarity and sharpness you lose. so... is it better to print the original file at just under 4Mp, or to upsize to 7Mp and risk losing image quality? depends on the interpolation process you use, and how demanding the publisher is...
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