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Old Oct 20, 2008, 11:44 PM   #1
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Im a photography student at cu denver so i know alot about photography but I dont know everything, I read everything the people have to say about sports photography especially John G and learn so much
such as: shoot ice hockey from ice level,
shoot in portriat, etc
So heres my situation I shoot ice hockey mostly, but want to also shoot socccer, football, but dont have the lenses to do it.

Canon 40D, canon 70-200 f 2.8 IS, canon 24-70 f 2.8

not good shots, just for examples



ice hockey with good lightning



bad lighting rink, too much noise at iso 3200

At the ice hockey rink i can get high enough shutter speed with my 70-200 f 2.8 at 800 ISO with my canon 40D
at the other rink the lighting is bad and at 2.8 i get shutter speeds around 400, too slow, and at ISO 3200 its just too noisy , It jumps from 1200 to 3200 on the 40D I think
there is just too much noise so, i have stopped shooting at that rink, also I find that the reach of a 200mm on the 40D is not enough for the whole rink,
what would u suggest to do about that,

Next problem for football, soccer, I want to get a new lense say a 300mm or 400mm
So I know most of the lenses out there, I have about $ 1000-1500

Canon 100-400 f 4.5-5.6 IS (i know is does not stop motion) around $1500
its too slow for anything under the lights,

Canon 300 f 4, around 1300 ( also slow but no IS)

Canon 400 f 5.6 ( good magnification for sports but slow and can not user under the lights)

or my canon 70-200 with a 1.4 or 2X teleconverter, but then image degradation and will also be slow, no night shooting.


I know the lenses like 400 f2.8 like the pros use and such, but like 10 grand.

so what would the best option be in this situation. which lenses or lense combinations.
Sorrry about the long post, but just wanted to get this sorted out one and for all.

thanks for your info

Brett.



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Old Oct 21, 2008, 7:30 AM   #2
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On hockey:

The first thing that jumps out at me in these 2 images is they are very underexposed. Easily a stop. That is going to lead to more noise. If you get the exposure level right in-camera the noise levels will be acceptable and using proper noise reduction software (Noiseware, Neatimage, Noise Ninja) you can get decent images at ISO 3200. But you need to get the exposure correct in the camera not in post processig.

As for reach - the solution is simple, stop trying to cover the action around the entire rink from one location. Realizing you can't always change locations it simply means you're only going to be able to cover action in a certain part of the rink. In reality, your angle is going to be far more of a problem than reach (i.e. faces turned the other way, other players in between you and the action). Sports shooting isn't about trying to capture every play - it's about capturing great images. So, given the location you're shooting from and the lens you have, you have to visualize the types of action that will look good. Then wait for the action to happen in that area.

For field sports - in your price range I would suggest either:

Canon 100-400

or

Sigma 100-300 f4

Unless you have a 2nd camera body I don't recommend a 300mm or 400mm prime.

The 100-300 MIGHT work under the lights but I wouldn't count on it. At that point it's time to switch back to your 70-200.
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 8:56 AM   #3
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I will agree with JohnG, it is good advice. For soccer, football and baseball I use a canon 70-300 USM IS lens. Someday when the budget says I can I will buy something better. With what you have budgeted you can get a very good lens.
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 10:56 AM   #4
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JohnG wrote:
Quote:
Sports shooting isn't about trying to capture every play - it's about capturing great images. So, given the location you're shooting from and the lens you have, you have to visualize the types of action that will look good. Then wait for the action to happen in that area.
I've only been at sports shooting a short timebut I think John's simple statement above did the most to help me. In the beginning, I tried to shoot eveything and figured I could just crop later. Those "far" pictures look horrible compared to the closer ones so I just gave up.
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 1:18 PM   #5
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thanks for the help, guys,
as for the underexposure, im not too sure why it is underexposing, for ice hockey i guess the meter is getting fooled. I normally shoot in aperture priority at 2.8
so what should i do to correct for the underexposure, shoot in manual, or use exposure compensation,

once again thanks for your help, its much appreciated,

Brett
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Old Oct 21, 2008, 1:20 PM   #6
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Brett,

The exposure is because of the ice - the camera is trying to make it neutral grey. I personally prefer manual exposure so the exposure doesn't get tricked by the jerseys in the frame.
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Old Oct 26, 2008, 10:54 PM   #7
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Another hint is to shoot RAW format.

You can always push the exposure 1-2 stops using software and the image will still look okay.
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 4:33 AM   #8
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terry@softreq.com wrote:
Quote:
Another hint is to shoot RAW format.

You can always push the exposure 1-2 stops using software and the image will still look okay.
I'm going to disagree with Terry on this. That trick brings out a lot of noise when pushing a high ISO exposure. Try a few shots that way vs. a few shots where you get the exposure correct in camera. you'll see getting it correct in camera results in much cleaner images. It also saves you the extra steps of RAW conversion. But again, try for yourself and see.
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