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Old Jun 24, 2009, 1:50 AM   #1
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Default Australian Rules Football

First time posting pics on this site so I hope you like them (even though you may not understand whats happening in them).
These shots are taken at a place cricket fans will definitely recognise, Adelaide Oval.
You will notice some constuction work going on in the backround of the pics which I think makes for some interesting shots. They are in the process of increasing capacity to 45,000, up from 30,000.
If anyone has any questions on whats going on in the shots i'll do my best to answer.
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 5:12 AM   #2
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The last game of Australian Rules Football I watched, there was a delay of about 20 minutes because there was an injury on the field, and they had run out of stretchers to carry the casualties away. Tough sport.

The first image doesn't seem to have any EXIF data, but all the others show that the flash fired. You could probably have saved the batteries, since the subject was so far away that your flash didn't make any difference.

I presume these are crops since they're all different sizes. You might want to zoom in a little tighter, to get better shots of the action.

You were certainly a Johnny-on-the-spot when capturing the exact moment of the action, and it seems that the relatively slow shutter speeds didn't adversely affect these images. Nice job.

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Old Jun 24, 2009, 6:17 AM   #3
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Thanks mate. To tell you the truth, I didn't even realise the flash was firing.
Being a night match, which we rarely play, it was kind of hard to get the settings right and as you can see the top two shots are a little darker than I would like (I then up'ed the ISO for the rest).
It's my first SLR which i've only had for about two weeks so i'd say there should be lots of improvement to be seen.
Should be able to buy some new lenses soon, I only have the two Zuiko's (14-42mm and 40-150mm) that came with the Olympus E-520. What would you recommend that I purchase for close in shots?
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 6:27 AM   #4
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Should be able to buy some new lenses soon, I only have the two Zuiko's (14-42mm and 40-150mm) that came with the Olympus E-520. What would you recommend that I purchase for close in shots?
You might want to consider the Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 however as you mentioned in another thread you are looking at getting into pro sports shooting I personally wouldn't go for much more investment in the 4/3 system for this purpose.
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 7:25 AM   #5
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in another thread you are looking at getting into pro sports shooting I personally wouldn't go for much more investment in the 4/3 system for this purpose.
Also, if you are considering getting into pro sports photography, you need to alter your approach to shooting. You need to frame your shots MUCH, MUCH tighter (note: I said frame, not crop). In essence, the action should fill the frame in-camera. That can be difficult to do as a fan for higher levels of play. Potential employers don't care what level of play are in the shots, they care about the quality of the shots. Your portfolio could be entirely youth - but the quality of your work will be evident and that's what they care about.

Also, I agree with Mark. If you intend to shoot sports professionally, you should probably get into Nikon or Canon as early as possiible and start building up your lens collection. The 4/3 system has some great glass, but the system as a whole just doesn't compete well against Canon and Nikon in the sports shooting world.
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 7:35 AM   #6
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Thanks for the advice people. Shall look into Canon and Nikon rather than buy more lenses for this camera. Any paticular body I should look into for what i'm wanting to acheive?
Also, i'm not only interested in sports photography, I basically like taking shots of anything and everything. What sort of subjects is my current camera best for?
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 9:30 AM   #7
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Voice,

There are two distinct areas where Oly does not do as well as the competition:
1) high ISO performance
2) AF tracking of moving subjects

The high ISO aspect is directly related to sensor size. In that area they are likely always going to trail the competition - especially with a lot of the competition moving to full-frame sensors in their pro level cameras. Smaller sensors will always have more noise. The AF tracking is related to other systems having professional level sports and wildlife markets. Oly simply doesn't have the same constituency to make happy. They also don't have an army of beta-testers to test out equipment. Those two things combine to make it very difficult to develop and test a pro grade AF system - and really, it's probably not a good spend of R&D $$$ for Oly. Really, Oly does exceptionally well at most areas of photography that don't rely on the above 2 types of shooting.

You have to understand though, that for sports shooting (and other types as well), lenses used are at least as important as the camera body. A D90 or T1i with 300mm 2.8 lens will outperform a Nikon D3 or Canon 1dmkIII with Sigma 70-300 lens.

The Nikon D90 or Canon T1i are good entry level sports cameras in those two systems. Lens selection depends entirely on the sports you want to shoot and the conditions you want to shoot in. There is NO single lens solution for sports. The lenses you buy are chosen based upon the sports. And, unless you have unlimited funds, you are going to have to make sacrifices. The more breadth of sports you want to cover the more sacrifices you need to make.
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Old Jun 24, 2009, 10:04 PM   #8
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ESPN used to carry these games and I LOVED to watch it. Great sport.
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Old Jul 21, 2009, 3:48 PM   #9
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i don't want to be redundant, mark, and johng gave you all the technical details. what i did was test side by side an oly 500 with a canon 10d.
the oly i had a 50-200mm 2.8-3.5 lens, and the canon 10d i had a 70-200mm 2.8. i set both on the highest iso. and biggest aperture, 2.8 on the canon, and as you know the longer you zoom the oly it would go to 3.5. anyway, don't get me wrong, i love the oly, but i didn't have the 6-7grand to buy the 90-250 2.8. now here is the kicker since the oly has a four/thirds type sensor your focal lenth is doubled as opposed to the canon 1.6 crop and actually you can notice the difference. but like johng said the noise is so much worse on the oly. i have an e-1 which is so awesome with portraits. but anything over iso 400 and the noise or grain is just terrible. but i use the e-1 in situations i know will work. now if you are going for sports you will invest big money. you have to have long lenses with big apertures and all you have to do is just google for prices, do we all wish we could have those? yes, but how practical are they? will you do enough work to finance them, you can! i see guys at these pro games and always compliment them on their lenses, here is the reply i get all the time, yeah try carrying this thing around for awhile, and see how cool they really are! hahahahahahaha anyway, i'll try to find the comparison shots and post up! good luck! john
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Old Jul 21, 2009, 4:40 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Mark1616 View Post
You might want to consider the Sigma 70-200mm f2.8 however as you mentioned in another thread you are looking at getting into pro sports shooting I personally wouldn't go for much more investment in the 4/3 system for this purpose.
I've never tried to shoot sports, though since the Sigma 70-200 was mentioned, I think I should head out to a ball game one night to see how well I can do.

I will speak for the lens and tell you that it's outstanding at other things. On my Nikon D50 body (far from current), I've managed some decent wildlife shots (the limiting factor was focal length, tough to get close enough to a scared little bird with 200mm). The continuous autofocus is fast and accurate, and the lens itself is very sharp... ....This of course, on top of my lack of practice framing and composing pictures of wildlife... I'm definitely a newbie in that department!!
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