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Old Aug 23, 2010, 2:47 PM   #1
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This newbie needs some help please. I shot these in A mode on my D5000. I moved the ISO to 1600. However when I uploaded these to my computer, it says they were taken at an ISO of 200. Anyone know why? Now I did notice on my camera LCD that I was being told that the subject was to bright. So what did I do wrong? This pictures turned out ok but I want them to be better next time. They seem a little grainy and not very sharp. Any C&C is appreciated. Thanks.
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 3:18 PM   #2
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These images have no EXIF data. Whatever application you used to reduce the images, must have stripped away the EXIF data at the same time. Can you try to post them again with the EXIF data?
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 3:50 PM   #3
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Let me know if this has the information
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 4:53 PM   #4
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Well the exif is not in the images, so I can't see what settings you used. But if you shot in anything other than manual and didn't use exposure compensation then the camera did what it was designed to do - protect the highlights. It is why I recommend using a manual exposure. But if you do use aperture priority then you need to use an appropriate amount of exposure compensation to tell the camera to ignore what it thinks is the proper exposure. Football is tricky because of the helmets and white on top of it. you need to take control and sacrifice uniform and sky highlights to get the faces exposed properly. As to your question about ISO - I'm not familiar with auto ISO but perhaps that might be the cause.

Here's a shot that illustrates what I'm talking about in regards to exposure - note the blown highlights but the faces are exposed the way I wanted:
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 4:58 PM   #5
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The colors of uniforms can throw off the exposure system, as JohnG's shot shows, so that's why it's important to get the exposure right for the faces.
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 5:04 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
The colors of uniforms can throw off the exposure system, as JohnG's shot shows, so that's why it's important to get the exposure right for the faces.
And the only way to do that is shoot manual exposure or use exposure compensation.
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 6:13 PM   #7
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Sorry for the lack of knowledge here. If I do shoot in A, then how do I adjust exposure compensation? Aslo, if you shoot in manual, how do you know you have your settings correct. I mean, it's hard to for me tell if my shots are going to come out right when I'm out on the football field.

Thanks and sorry for the lack of experience or technical knowledge.
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 6:48 PM   #8
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I think you could use A Priority, did you have partial metering? I think that would help exposure, and center point focus.....

JohnG is the expert, I am just a novice enthusiast trying my best....

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Old Aug 23, 2010, 7:38 PM   #9
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BTW, you should try to keep the Sun at your back.
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Old Aug 23, 2010, 8:19 PM   #10
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Don't apologize for lack of experience we all start out that way. Here's the thing about football - it's tricky lighting/shadows but it's usually consistent - unless the sun is moving in and out of clouds. If the light is constant you just need to change settings when you change angles. As I mentioned manual is actually easiest. Here's why - when you shoot aperture priority (or any other mode where the camera determines exposure) - if you have a single player with white jersey in the frame youll get one exposure - throw a couple dark jerseys in the frame and you'll get another reading entirely. You can determine the proper exposure by starting there and shooting tight on a face - then look at the lcd after the shot - see if it looks good or bad - just on the face. Then use the settings the camera used and switch to manual. If the face looks underexposed then change shutter speed slower by a bit and try another test shot. You do this during drills. After a couple shots you'll have a decent set of settings. Then you simply continue to review shots during down time to adjust exposures. Always re-evaluate when you change shooting positions to a different angle - i.e. if you move up and down the same sideline the exposure shouldn't change but if you change angles it will. Always shoot with aperture at widest setting, adjust shutter up and down and bump ISO whenever you get below 1/1000 until ISO gets to whatever you think is your upper limit unless you get to 1/400. Don't go below 1/400 unless ISO is at camera's max value.
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