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Old Nov 14, 2010, 7:35 PM   #1
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Default first basketball game shoot at carrier dome for SU game

this was my first ever taking pics of somthing like this i was using a d3000 with a 55-200mm lens on manual mode let me know what u guys think. i ended up getting alot closer for the girls game i was right behind some professional photographers
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Old Nov 14, 2010, 7:36 PM   #2
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some more
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Old Nov 15, 2010, 4:26 PM   #3
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any input? thanks
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Old Nov 15, 2010, 5:07 PM   #4
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any input? thanks
For fan snapshots from the stands these are fine. As sports photographs though, there's just too much going against you to get good photos with the lens you were using.

shot 1: nice timing on the tip-off. But the players just aren't sharp - shutter speed is too slow.

shot 2: nothing in focus, too much dead space. Timing is good but the angle is wrong getting the shooter from behind. Realize you can't move anywhere you want, but you hae to choose your shots where you can see faces.

shot 3: again nothing in focus, shutter speed too slow, no interesting action

shot 4: again good timing at the tip, but too blurry and the noise is really an issue.

shot 5: underexposed - exif is stripped so can't tell what mode you were using or what settings were. Again, too much motion blur to be sharp.

shot 6: not much interesting with free throws. Still, action takes up too little of the frame - if you're going to shoot a foul shot you want to be tight so you can make out expression. Players in the foreground are a big distraction. Also want to get the ball closer to release point.

shot 7: good action but focus is off and too much blur. Noise is also a problem here

shot 8: too much dead space, too much noise and too much motion blur.

I realize this sounds harsh, but you simply didn't use tools necessary to get decent sports photos. Noise reduction software will help with the noise issues

So, my advice is the same as it was when you asked before shooting: get the right tools first, otherwise it's just too difficult to get useable shots.
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Old Nov 15, 2010, 5:27 PM   #5
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i relize there not the best but there the best i could get with the tools i have/can afford right now thanks for the input
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Old Nov 16, 2010, 7:32 AM   #6
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i relize there not the best but there the best i could get with the tools i have/can afford right now thanks for the input
You've stated in another thread you want to be a photographer - being a photographer is not the same thing as taking pictures. Wanting to do a certain type of photography and having the right tools to do it are two different things. I completely understand you cannot afford the right tools right now to do low light sports photography. No shame in that. So, you adapt and do another type of photography. If you want to try sports work then try something outside where you can work within the limits of your gear.

I think it's great you're enthusiastic. But I somehow get the feeling from your posts so far on the forum that you were just looking for people to reinforce what a great photographer you are. Slow down and learn to take advice. You may be surprised that you might actually be able to learn from what other people have to say.
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Old Nov 16, 2010, 8:44 AM   #7
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Hi Zombz;

First, as fan of Indiana University, you have my sympathy for being required by some outside force to shoot photos of Syracuse University basketball.

We're rebuilding at IU these days. And there's certainly a long road ahead of us, but we'll be back.

Now, back to the photography.

A friend gave me this advice on photography. He said, "In life, the main thing is keeping the main thing, the main thing. But that's not true in photography" He said make the main thing the only thing.

So how do we do that? Well, shooting at the Carrier Dome from the floor would be a huge deal for me. If it were me, I'd rent the right lens for the job. I'd rent a 400mm 2.8f lens. That 2.8f blur the crowd, focus sharp on the players and I think I'd have some great shots at the end of the day.

With that lens, you could also open up the dof maybe get a shot of the coach or players on the bench in sharp focus with some action on the court in soft focus. That way you're taking a shot of the emotion of the moment.

I totally agree with you that the gear you want is really expensive. But renting it for a special occasion might make the difference between snapshots with a long lens and great photographic images that would make the harshest critic say "wow".

BTW, Moderator JohnG also gave me somewhat the same lecture he just gave you. Yep, it stung a little, unfortunately, everything he wrote was true. I'd still be snapping bad snap shots if it wasn't guys like him and Mark 1616 and Peripetic.

I keep posting, they keep critiquing and point out faults and flaws. But their criticisms are fewer these days. They are looking at smaller and smaller flaws. And I actually get a compliment or two every now and then. Kinda makes my day.

Those guys know their craft and they've really helped me along the way.

When I want a compliment on my photography skills, I take a photo of my kids and give it to their grandmother. When I want to get better at photography, I post it here and ask for C&C. Neither Grandma nor the Moderators have ever let me down.

GO ORANGE!

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Old Nov 16, 2010, 8:50 AM   #8
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JohnG, if you put yourself in Zombz situation, what lens would take to this game? What would your most likely ISO be and what shutter speed would you start with if you were trying to freeze the action rather than shooting second curtain or some other effect?

Also, for fast paced action, is manual focus as reliable as auto focus?
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Old Nov 16, 2010, 9:04 AM   #9
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FP - you're not allowed to flash at NCAA Div I so that option is out. Renting a 70-200 2.8 would provide the aperture needed, BUT it might not be allowed in. For example a friend of mine called me last night with outstanding seats to tonight's Cleveland Cavs game. Their gear restrictions say no lens longer than 6 inches in length (or more than 4 inches in diameter). That means the 70-200 2.8 is OUT - especially when put on my 1dIII. Now, I could try to bring it anyways and risk having to take it back to the car. But instead I'm just going to go and enjoy the game. Conversely, the Cleveland Indians' only restriction is - no monopods and no interfering with other fans. So they don't mind me bringing a 100-400L. But I still only take it if I have good seats. If I don't then it's just a waste so I leave it at home and just enjoy the game.

So, you're right - renting a lens is a great idea - as long as the venue will allow you to use it. I'd hate to spend $50 on a rental and be forced to take it back to the car. But your point is still an excellent one - what is it that's important to the OP? If it's shooting syracuse because they have great seats then renting is a great way to get the right tool with minimal cost.
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Old Nov 16, 2010, 9:11 AM   #10
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Oh - as to manual focus vs. AF - MF is a lot trickier. It doesn't help if you don't have fast enough shutter speeds anyway, but it can be done if you don't have a fast enough focusing lens. The technique is generally to focus on a spot on the floor and wait for the action to hit that spot - now imagine that spot being an ARC - the arc represents the plain of focus - anything on the arc is in focus so you can catch anything on the arc - takes a lot of practice. Those that were really skilled could adjust focus to track players. But that takes a lot of practice. Now, the problem is with many DSLRs you don't have a full viewfinder and it may be a bit dim - which makes the job harder. Also you don't have screens in the viewfinder conducive to manual focus. Although you can often buy those separate. But, if you've got the right lens - the AF systems in any DSLR today are going to perform much better than manual focus will for sports work in most situations. There are times when MF works (confetti falling, wanting to compose a static shot at shallow DOF and don't want to focus/recompose or other exception situations where AF will get fooled. But if you're not practiced at manual focusing with the gear you're using, you're in for a lot of frustration at the shallow depth of field involved.
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