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Old Feb 9, 2005, 10:00 AM   #11
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I was wondering if anyone could give me some help with shooting sports inside a gym.Last night i tried shooting basketball ,and the action was fast , when using burst with no flash the pictures were poor very grainy. If i used tiff or a raw setting with an external flash , pictures were very nice and clear. But the flash couldnt keep up as niether could my auto focus ,not to mention the recycle time for my camera to load from the buffer to the card. I shoot with an Olympus ultra zoom 750, and it is slow . i missed quite a few shots. It does great for slower sports like wrestling where the action is more centralized. I was wondering A. With a dslr, if i didnt use a burst mode , how fast could they recycle to the card and be ready to take the next shot? B. is there a flash unit that can somewhat keep up with the action? C. can a flash unit be used with the burst mode. D. is it the burst mode that gives the camera's their 2.5fps or 3fps as the case with the d70? E. is there any other technique i could use to capture the action and still get a good printable photo? The reason i ask is i was wonder if i shoudl spend the money on a good flash and if so what type would work , or go for a faster lens, than say a 70-200mm 3.5-5.6 ? A friend of mine told me he always shoots sports with a flash unit and a seperate battery pack, for his 35mm, an dhe is switching to digital and assumes it would be the same. He is going for the 20d. anyhow any help would be appreciated . Thanks Bill B zwdb08@yahoo.com
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Old Feb 9, 2005, 10:09 AM   #12
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One more dumb question what is flash syn and how does it effect the flash. If its say 250 then does that mean the shutter could not be faster than 250? So when buying a camera and or flash what does that sync speed mean. The d 70 is 500, where the 20d i think is 250 ,and the rebel 125. When i was looking at 35mm cameras i noticed typically the higher end cameras were higher in the flash sync...

Bill Butcher zwdb08@yahoo.com
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Old Feb 11, 2005, 10:05 AM   #13
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zwdb08 wrote:
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One more dumb question what is flash syn and how does it effect the flash. If its say 250 then does that mean the shutter could not be faster than 250? So when buying a camera and or flash what does that sync speed mean. The d 70 is 500, where the 20d i think is 250 ,and the rebel 125. When i was looking at 35mm cameras i noticed typically the higher end cameras were higher in the flash sync...

Bill Butcher zwdb08@yahoo.com
you're right with the flash sync.
It is the fastest possible shutter speed you can get when using the flash.
Also read this: http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/syncspeed.htm
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Old Feb 12, 2005, 7:49 AM   #14
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If your using full flash power on your external flash, it's going to take anywhere from 2 to 5 seconds for the flash to recharge after firing. Obviously that rechargetime won't keep up with your continuous shooting approach.

Forget continous shooting mode if your using flash. Try to anticipate where the best shot is going to be (top of a jump shot for example) and fire away just before that moment. You'll get to know the shutter and timing lag of your camera so that you will time your shots more effectively.

Also, consider shooting with an aperature as wide open as possible to use all the existing light you can, then use "fill flash" on a manual setting, using maybe 1/16 or 1/8 or 1/4 power of your flash or whatever power works for your situation. An external flash on 1/16 power recharges in no time at all. I don't think, however, 1/16th power will recharge quickly enough to keep up with a continuous shooting mode of several frames per second.

I hope all the above helps. Shooting sports, especially in low light situations like gymnasiums, really pushes photographic equipment to it's limit. You want the fastest frames per second, least shutter lag, fastest lens, highest and cleanest ISO values, high shutter speed, white balance problems, etc. etc. that the average outdoor shooter doesn't have to worry about.

Keeping all this in mind, you're still trying to frame a good action shot!


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