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Old Jun 18, 2005, 10:56 AM   #11
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vIZnquest wrote:
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Wow! Did not think that the Canon had to go so high in iso and shutter speed. I used my *ist DS at iso 200 and shutter speed (TV mode) of 1/250 and got no blur whatsoever. I have the exif intact on my posting if you care to look at it.

I did post earlier and I will say that the sun was very good that day so that is possibly how I was able to get those shots that I posted earlier.Try to shoot from the opposite side of the field to get good DOF.

In the case of the goalkeeper that does not always apply.


http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=82


On a sunny day I can get these at iso 100 to 200, but it is winter here right now and my son plays in the late afternoon and it is getting dark at 5.30pm these days.
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Old Jun 24, 2005, 11:09 PM   #12
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Light is everything. Given that, keep in mind the rule (don't know who came up with it) that you need at least 1x the focal length in shutter speed. If I remember correctly from an earlier post you are shooting either a 20D or a 350D. In either case, these have a 1.6 form-factor. If you are shooting at 300 mm, then you'll need at least a 1/500 shutter speed - at any lens opening (300 x 1.6 = 480). Your apeture on these shots was just too small to give you the speed you needed to do a better job of freezing the movement in the images. If you've got the 20D or the 350D, ISO 800 should produce some decently clean shots, with little noise. You can always use a high ISO noise filter to clean these up afterwards, if the noise is too noticeable for your liking. CS2 includes a new smart sharpen filter option which includes several advanced options, and a specific fix for motion blur. You identify the direction of the movement, and the number of pixels of blur in that direction, and it does a decent job of cleaning up action shots - as long as you resist the temptation to select too many pixels. A poor mans version of this built-in filter in CS2, is Focus Magic, which includes the motion blur tool, which is nearly identical to the CS2 version, and, an out of focus blur removal tool. I know the first shot or two in your sequence could have been greatly improved with just either one of those tools. Some of the others are too far gone to benefit from these tools. Just my thoughts on this. I really liked your motocross shots, alady40.

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Old Jun 25, 2005, 1:18 AM   #13
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Ward Larson wrote:
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Light is everything. Given that, keep in mind the rule (don't know who came up with it) that you need at least 1x the focal length in shutter speed. If I remember correctly from an earlier post you are shooting either a 20D or a 350D. In either case, these have a 1.6 form-factor. If you are shooting at 300 mm, then you'll need at least a 1/500 shutter speed - at any lens opening (300 x 1.6 = 480). Your apeture on these shots was just too small to give you the speed you needed to do a better job of freezing the movement in the images. If you've got the 20D or the 350D, ISO 800 should produce some decently clean shots, with little noise. You can always use a high ISO noise filter to clean these up afterwards, if the noise is too noticeable for your liking. CS2 includes a new smart sharpen filter option which includes several advanced options, and a specific fix for motion blur. You identify the direction of the movement, and the number of pixels of blur in that direction, and it does a decent job of cleaning up action shots - as long as you resist the temptation to select too many pixels. A poor mans version of this built-in filter in CS2, is Focus Magic, which includes the motion blur tool, which is nearly identical to the CS2 version, and, an out of focus blur removal tool. I know the first shot or two in your sequence could have been greatly improved with just either one of those tools. Some of the others are too far gone to benefit from these tools. Just my thoughts on this. I really liked your motocross shots, alady40.

Ward

Thanks, Ive been experimenting with movement such as flight of birds, I have the 300D with a 100-300 usm lens. Ive got reasonable shot at 1600 ISO at 1/1250 in dull light but I want to get shots with a lower ISO. Ive set the camera at 800 ISO and Im playing with the shutter speeds today as the weather has improved (we are in the middle of winter and its sunny today around 16C). I think its just trial and error for me. The motocross shots were easy, camera set at AV F8 and ISO 800. What Im trying to do is master the manual and TV settings. I plan to know this camera very well before I move up to a more expensive one. I cant see the point of owning a DSLR unless you are going to bother with more than the auto settings.

Would you call 1/500 a reasonably fast shutter speed?


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Old Jun 25, 2005, 5:16 AM   #14
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At 300 mm, on a camera with a 1.6 sensor (translates to having a 480 mm 35mm film camera lens), 1/500 is probably at the "edge" of adequate for most of us, taking hand-held shots,- without the advantage of having an Image Stabilized lens. As I stated earlier, this is just an old rule of thumb - but it does seem to be fairly accurate. If your lens is sharp at full apeture, and light is an issue, I'd shoot at the widest apeture that I could get a reasonably crisp shot, to allow me to get the shutter speed necessary to eliminate as much of the photographer-induced vibration as possible.

In regards to getting good shots consistently, of birds in flight...... some bad new here for you. The 300D firmware was "dumbed down" from that in the 10D, to justify the much lower price. There were a number of other things done so that Canon could slot this camera at this price point, but the reduced functionality on the same CMOS sensor was the most irritating part of the limited capabilities introduced by Canon. One of the most valuable - in my opinion - was the loss of AI focus. There are some ways that you can still do some good photography without these capabilities, but it sure became more difficult. You may already be aware of those changes, but if not, there are discussions all over the web on this subject. Judging from your earlier shots taken at the motocross with your 300D, you obviously have some God-given talent. Just don't get too frustrated with the current set of limitations and as soon as you can afford it, get yourself a 350D, or a 20D to get the advantage of AI Focus, and you'll be amazed at what these cameras can do. I also agree with you in re to wasting your time in program mode. Best of luck Alady40.

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Old Jun 25, 2005, 6:33 AM   #15
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Thanks, not interested in the 350D (too small feeling) but a 20D is down the track sometime. I still cant get over the fact that I got such clear shots of the motocross in Av mode and let the camera sort out the shutter speed yet I have such problems in TV mode with the soccer:roll:

Thanks for the advice
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