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Old May 9, 2006, 2:20 PM   #1
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This is my second attempt at photographing baseball. All shots were with my Canon S2 IS. Let me know what you think. Thanks for looking

Will

Negro League Comm. Night.

Negro League player Syke Burnett

http://img251.imageshack.us/img251/5690/img3149sykeburnettresize1kd.jpg

Negro League player Ed 'GG' Burton

http://img188.imageshack.us/img188/2628/burtonresize3qk.jpg

Negro League player Willie Fordham threw out the first pitch

http://img188.imageshack.us/img188/3598/img3161williefordhamresize6ya.jpg

Erie Hitting coach and former MLB player Pete Incaviglia

http://img188.imageshack.us/img188/5218/img3169peteresize5wn.jpg

Harrisburg starting pitcher Oscar Alvarez

http://img251.imageshack.us/img251/9604/img3175oscaralvarezresize3vv.jpg

Erie Second baseman Juan Francia

http://img251.imageshack.us/img251/3261/img322211resize4sz.jpg

Harrisburg 3rd baseman and Nationals top ten prospect Kory Casto

http://img188.imageshack.us/img188/1603/img3380castoresize6to.jpg

Another of Kory Casto

http://img251.imageshack.us/img251/9127/img3600casto2resize9el.jpg



Thanks for looking
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Old May 9, 2006, 4:02 PM   #2
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Bkstyl,

some nice portrait shots - especially the last one. For the profile shots - especially the pitcher and bunter your framing tends to have the person in the center or forward in the frame. As a general rule, I think photographs are more effective when the person is towards the 'back' of the frame so you get an impression of what they are looking towards. So a right handed batter would typically be in the back third of the frame. Doing this draws the viewer's eye towards their gaze. For whatever reason, it seems 'appropriate' to have more dead space in front of the subject's gaze rather than behind it. The exception is if the person is not the focus (i.e. if a ball hitting the catcher's glove is the focus you would position the batter more forward so the eye is drawn to the ball first). Consider it a modified rule of thirds - the focus point still should not be in the center of the photograph (in general). Hopefully that ramble made sense :-)

Other than that framing issue, I think you did a very good job with the equipment you had. Keep at it.
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Old May 10, 2006, 10:12 AM   #3
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John,



Thanks for the feedback. Your suggestions make sense to me. I will take it into consideration when photographing and post processing in the future. With the photos above, most of what you commented on came from of how I post processed them. Thanks

PS:

The player in the last portrait shot asked for a 8X10 print.
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Old May 10, 2006, 1:46 PM   #4
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bkstyl wrote:
Quote:
With the photos above, most of what you commented on came from of how I post processed them. Thanks

PS:

The player in the last portrait shot asked for a 8X10 print.
First off - congratulations on the 8x10!

As to processing vs in-camera, the lesson here is: never process the originals - keep an untouched version of the photo. Kind of goes for any photo - new software comes out, or we learn a new technique to do something better, you can always go back to the original then. As an example: 8x10s. More experienced sports shooters kept hammering in that I needed to crop tighter - so I started to do that. But, when it came time to make some 8x10 prints of some of my shots, they were cropped too tight (I use a Canon 20d which has a 2:3 aspect ratio). Luckily I had the uncropped originals to fall back to. It can be really tough adding in extra image to the top/bottom of a photo just so you can fit the entire player in the width
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Old May 10, 2006, 3:55 PM   #5
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JohnG wrote:
Quote:
First off - congratulations on the 8x10!

As to processing vs in-camera, the lesson here is: never process the originals - keep an untouched version of the photo. Kind of goes for any photo - new software comes out, or we learn a new technique to do something better, you can always go back to the original then. As an example: 8x10s. More experienced sports shooters kept hammering in that I needed to crop tighter - so I started to do that. But, when it came time to make some 8x10 prints of some of my shots, they were cropped too tight (I use a Canon 20d which has a 2:3 aspect ratio). Luckily I had the uncropped originals to fall back to. It can be really tough adding in extra image to the top/bottom of a photo just so you can fit the entire player in the width
Thanks for the tip. IALWAYS keep the originalsunprocessed. I learned that the hard way (as mostpeople do).

I also have a reallynice photo of Ian Desmondand he wants an 8X10 to send to his family. Ian is a top ten prospect for the Nationals too and has been compared to Jeter.Kory Casto and Ian both signed the photos for me.




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