Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Transportation

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:13 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Many thanks to A.C. Smith for alerting me to this thread.

I guess I am showing my age, but I did fly the PBY-5A and PBY-6 both. The PBY in the photos is actually a PBY-6 which had retractable wing tip floats. You can see the wing tip floats both up and down in that series of photos.

Designed by Consolidated Aircraft Company of Buffalo, NY in late 1926 and entered production in 1928. Consolidated called the aircraft the Consolidated Commodore, and promoted the aircraft as a luxury airliner. Because the Commodore had the needed range, New York and Buenos Aires Airways bought the Commodore, putting it service to South America in August 1929.

The airline had landing rights in Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, and later Chile and Peru. Under political and financial pressure from Pan American World Airways, coupled with the Great Depression, NYBAA entered into a "forced" takeover by Pan American that was begun in late 1930, and finalized in 1931. Because Pan American exclusively flew Sirkorsky flying boats, the Consolidated Commodores were taken out of service by mid 1931.

However, Consolidated got lucky and sold the U.S. Navy on the Commodore aircraft by agreeing to redesign the aircraft as a Patrol Plane and to move their factory from Buffalo, NY to San Diego, CA. The entire Consolidated Aircraft Company was packed up, including the production line, and put on rail cars for cross country shipment to California.

The U.S. Navy contract saved the Consolidated Aircraft Company during the Great Depression, just as it appeared that they were about to go out of business entirely.The PBY, as the U.S. Navy called the aircraft survived competition from other aircraft, including the Ford Trimotor aircraft.

The single battle of World War II that guaranteed the PBY's place in the decisive Battle of Midway in 1942. It was a PBY aircraft, flying with the radio call sign of "Strawberry 6" that was the first of the United States Navy forces to sight the expected Japanese forces sailing into the Battle of Midway.

The Japanese were possibly expected to start the battle due to a huge intelligence break that took place when the U.S. Navy's Hawaiian code breakers managed to crack the Japanese Naval Code in January 1942.

My last flight on a PBY-6 as Patrol Plane Commander was in late 1961, when I flew a PBY-6 from Alameda, CA to Pearl Harbor, HI for a celebration of Pearl Harbor Day and the 50th aniversary of Naval Aviation in Hawaii. It was the return flight from Pearl Harbor, HI to Alameda, CA that is the longest flight in my Pilot Logbook (37,604 hours). That flight took 23 hours and 42 minutes from take-off to touchdown. We had departed from Pearl Harbor's famous Kehi Lagoon sea lane that was carved out of solid coral in World War II and was actually lighted with underwater lighting on our flight back to Alameda, CA.

I went on from being a young Navy Flier (one of the first women trained in the post WWII era due to Congressional legislation in 1957) to flying for Trans World Airlines for 32 years . I was TWA's first wide body aircraft female captain. I retired as a Check Captain and a Boeing 747 Captain for TWA in 1995.

Thanks for bearing with me and allowing me to post a few details.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Mar 22, 2010 at 10:14 PM.
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:30 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Many thanks to A.C. Smith for alerting me to this thread.

I guess I am showing my age, but I did fly the PBY-5A and PBY-6 both. Designed by Consolidated Aircraft Company of Buffalo, NY in late 1926 and entered production in 1928. Consolidated called the aircraft the Consolidated Commodore, and promoted the aircraft as a luxury airliner. Because the Commodore had the needed range, New York and Buenos Aires Airways bought the Commodore, putting it service to South America in August 1929.

The airline had landing rights in Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, and later Chile and Peru. Under political and financial pressure from Pan American World Airways, coupled with the Great Depression, NYBAA entered into a "forced" takeover by Pan American that was begun in late 1930, and finalized in 1931. Because Pan American exclusively flew Sirkorsky flying boats, the Consolidated Commodores were taken out of service by mid 1931.

However, Consolidated got lucky and sold the U.S. Navy on the Commodore aircraft by agreeing to redesign the aircraft as a Patrol Plane and to move their factory from Buffalo, NY to San Diego, CA. The entire Consolidated Aircraft Company was packed up, including the production line, and put on rail cars for cross country shipment to California.

The U.S. Navy contract saved the Consolidated Aircraft Company during the Great Depression, just as it appeared that they were about to go out of business entirely.The PBY, as the U.S. Navy called the aircraft survived competition from other aircraft, including the Ford Trimotor aircraft.

The single battle of World War II that guaranteed the PBY's place in the decisive Battle of Midway in 1942. It was a PBY aircraft, flying with the radio call sign of "Strawberry 6" that was the first of the United States Navy forces to sight the expected Japanese forces sailing into the Battle of Midway.

The Japanese were possibly expected to start the battle due to a huge intelligence break that took place when the U.S. Navy's Hawaiian code breakers managed to crack the Japanese Naval Code in January 1942.

My last flight on a PBY-6 as Patrol Plane Commander was in late 1961, when I flew a PBY-6 from Alameda, CA to Pearl Harbor, HI for a celebration of Pearl Harbor Day and the 50th aniversary of Naval Aviation in Hawaii. It was the return flight from Pearl Harbor, HI to Alameda, CA that is the longest flight in my Pilot Logbook. That flight took 23 hours and 42 minutes from take-off to touchdown. We had departed from Pearl Harbor's famous Kehi Lagoon sea lane that was carved out of solid coral in World War II and was actually lighted with underwater lighting in our flight back to Alameda, CA.

I went on from being a young Navy Flier (one of the first women trained in the post WWII era due to Congressional legislation in 1957) to flying for Trans World Airlines for 32 years . I was TWA's first wide body aircraft female captain. I retired as a Check Captain and a Boeing 747 Captain for TWA in 1995.

Thanks for bearing with me and allowing me to post a few details.

Sarah Joyce
You had an exciting career Sarah. I enjoyed reading your post. I have a feeling as a pilot you had many an adventure.

My wife's Grandfather (now deceased) was an early Canadian bush pilot who started flying in the 1920's and retired as a Captain flying DC-6's in the very early '60's.

He had many an adventure, throughout his career and I felt privileged to listen to him relate his flying experiences.

Again, I enjoyed your post.

Les
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2010, 8:39 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
shoturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Frankfurt AM
Posts: 11,348
Default

I too enjoy reading the post. Check Captain for the 747, very impressive. For the 747-100 and 200? To bad aviation is not what it uses to be.
__________________
Super Frequent Flyer, no joke. Ex Patriot and loving it.
Canon Eos 60D, T1i/500D, Eos1, Eos 630, Olympus EPL-1, and a part time Pentax K-X shooter.
shoturtle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2010, 10:09 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Shoturtle-

Yes, I was a Line Captain as well as Check Pilot on both the B747-100 and B747-200 aircraft. TWA never had any B747-400 aircraft. Singapore Airlines that pushed the introduction of the B747-400.

I was also on the Analysis Team when TWA considered purchasing the L-1011-500 as I was also an L-1011 Line and Check Captain.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Mar 22, 2010 at 10:11 PM.
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 22, 2010, 10:16 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
shoturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Frankfurt AM
Posts: 11,348
Default

You have had a very interesting career.,

I have not seen a L1011 in a very long time. There are a few flying still, but not many left. I think doctors without border flies one as a mobile surgical unit around the world.
__________________
Super Frequent Flyer, no joke. Ex Patriot and loving it.
Canon Eos 60D, T1i/500D, Eos1, Eos 630, Olympus EPL-1, and a part time Pentax K-X shooter.
shoturtle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 23, 2010, 9:10 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

Sarah Joyce:

Thanks for the both the Consolidated history and your career notes. Enjoyed both. By the way my dad retired last June as a Designated Examiner at the age of 89.

A. C.
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 23, 2010, 9:40 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Eetu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jyväskylä, Finland
Posts: 2,212
Default

Rob, that is an incredible shot!!! Absolutely spot on, great composition... Dustin rework is very interesting, too. Anyway, real cool photo. Congrats and thanks.

Ned
Eetu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 24, 2010, 2:49 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Brisbane. Queensland, Australia
Posts: 669
Default

Apart from the photos, there are some amazing people at these forums! I'll have to contact a gentleman named Jack (setter dog), and see if he has visited this forum, as he told me recently he has flown a lot of different jets, WWII and post-WWII. I'm wondering if he has any photos...Jack, are you there?
chillgreg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 24, 2010, 2:54 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Brisbane. Queensland, Australia
Posts: 669
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Many thanks to A.C. Smith for alerting me to this thread.

I guess I am showing my age, but I did fly the PBY-5A and PBY-6 both. The PBY in the photos is actually a PBY-6 which had retractable wing tip floats. You can see the wing tip floats both up and down in that series of photos.

Designed by Consolidated Aircraft Company of Buffalo, NY in late 1926 and entered production in 1928. Consolidated called the aircraft the Consolidated Commodore, and promoted the aircraft as a luxury airliner. Because the Commodore had the needed range, New York and Buenos Aires Airways bought the Commodore, putting it service to South America in August 1929.

The airline had landing rights in Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, and later Chile and Peru. Under political and financial pressure from Pan American World Airways, coupled with the Great Depression, NYBAA entered into a "forced" takeover by Pan American that was begun in late 1930, and finalized in 1931. Because Pan American exclusively flew Sirkorsky flying boats, the Consolidated Commodores were taken out of service by mid 1931.

However, Consolidated got lucky and sold the U.S. Navy on the Commodore aircraft by agreeing to redesign the aircraft as a Patrol Plane and to move their factory from Buffalo, NY to San Diego, CA. The entire Consolidated Aircraft Company was packed up, including the production line, and put on rail cars for cross country shipment to California.

The U.S. Navy contract saved the Consolidated Aircraft Company during the Great Depression, just as it appeared that they were about to go out of business entirely.The PBY, as the U.S. Navy called the aircraft survived competition from other aircraft, including the Ford Trimotor aircraft.

The single battle of World War II that guaranteed the PBY's place in the decisive Battle of Midway in 1942. It was a PBY aircraft, flying with the radio call sign of "Strawberry 6" that was the first of the United States Navy forces to sight the expected Japanese forces sailing into the Battle of Midway.

The Japanese were possibly expected to start the battle due to a huge intelligence break that took place when the U.S. Navy's Hawaiian code breakers managed to crack the Japanese Naval Code in January 1942.

My last flight on a PBY-6 as Patrol Plane Commander was in late 1961, when I flew a PBY-6 from Alameda, CA to Pearl Harbor, HI for a celebration of Pearl Harbor Day and the 50th aniversary of Naval Aviation in Hawaii. It was the return flight from Pearl Harbor, HI to Alameda, CA that is the longest flight in my Pilot Logbook (37,604 hours). That flight took 23 hours and 42 minutes from take-off to touchdown. We had departed from Pearl Harbor's famous Kehi Lagoon sea lane that was carved out of solid coral in World War II and was actually lighted with underwater lighting on our flight back to Alameda, CA.

I went on from being a young Navy Flier (one of the first women trained in the post WWII era due to Congressional legislation in 1957) to flying for Trans World Airlines for 32 years . I was TWA's first wide body aircraft female captain. I retired as a Check Captain and a Boeing 747 Captain for TWA in 1995.

Thanks for bearing with me and allowing me to post a few details.

Sarah Joyce
Sarah I literally just got goosebumps reading your post. You sound like an amazing woman, who no doubt helped pave the way for many women's careers today. It seems as though photography is just a small part of your contribution to this amazing world we share.

mtclimber (Mountain Climber) is an apt moniker.

Sincerely
Greg

Last edited by chillgreg; Mar 24, 2010 at 2:56 AM.
chillgreg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 27, 2010, 10:09 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Thanks, Greg-

That's very kind of you.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:58 AM.