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Old Oct 14, 2006, 12:30 AM   #1
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We almost didn't go here because the Rick Steves Guide didn't recommend it...until I started studying the history of the building. This is one reason you should not always listen to the "experts"....

This church, whos cornerstone was laid by Louis XV in 1764, was originally to be modeled after St. Peter's in Rome. However, before any real work had beguneverything was stopped when the architect died. A second designer took over, tore down what had been started and began a new building to be designed after the Pantheon in Rome. Before it could be completed, the French Revolution put another halt to construction.

In 1806 Napoleon had the entire building torn down and the Greek-type structure that now stands was begun as a temple to his Grand Armies. Again, oweing toNaploeon's ultimate exile in 1816, the building was still not completed.

The final construction project was begun again by Louis XVIII, who also did not live to see the final project. It was completed during the rein of LouisPhilippeand was finallyconsecrated in 1842 as a church after one last thought to maybe turning the building into a train station.

On now to the images. This is a front view that faces towards the Place de la Concorde, which is just a few blocks away. This was shot with the 7mm setting on my 7-14 Zuiko,It's hard due to the super wide angle usedto really convey how big this building really is, even using the people in the image as a reference...
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 12:34 AM   #2
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The building is surrounded by these huge Corinthian columns. They are truly massive. While my girlfriend was admiring an adjacentflower market, I took out my 50-200 Zuiko andzoomed in and out, looking for an interesting angle to shoot the columns.
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 12:37 AM   #3
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Once inside, looking around I was drawn to the three huge domes above where light pours in, so I put the 7-14 Zuiko on again, zoomed to the widest setting and tried to include as much of the interior as possible while recording the domes. I spot metered on the interior and locked the exposure so the bright light would not underexpose the architecturaldetail...
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 12:41 AM   #4
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One is emmediatly drawn to the gorgeous "Mary Magdelene Ascending to Heaven" behind the high alter, designed by Charles Marochetti in 1837. Words are had to find in describing the beauty of this sculpture and the surrounding paintings and architecture.
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 12:43 AM   #5
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Going a little wider you get a real idea as to how beautiful this church really is. Imagine getting married in this place! As we left, it was being prepared for a wedding that evening.
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 12:44 AM   #6
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Joan of Arc, looking out on the congregation...
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 9:48 AM   #7
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I like your perspectives and subject choices. Excellent phots. Appreciate the fact that you give the technical info re; equipment, settings, etc.

I considere Olympus back in the 35 mm days (OM1) but stuck with my Pentax. I always thought that Olympus made a fine camaera and actually I have a 35 mm point and shoot Olympus that has been very good.

Your digital Olympus equipment are obviously a fine performers and the lenses seem to be tack sharp, judging by your final results.

But I do have a question, why did you choose Olympus in this day of Nikon and Canon dominance?

Reason for my question. I'm at the point where I am deciding whether to go with Pentax (K10D), Nikon D-series, Canon or possibly even Olympus, for a D-SLR.

My concern about Olympus and Pentax is that over the next couple of years they maybe overwhelmed and swallowed up, by Canon or Nikon.
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 10:29 AM   #8
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lesmore49 wrote:
Quote:
I like your perspectives and subject choices. Excellent phots. Appreciate the fact that you give the technical info re; equipment, settings, etc.

I considere Olympus back in the 35 mm days (OM1) but stuck with my Pentax. I always thought that Olympus made a fine camaera and actually I have a 35 mm point and shoot Olympus that has been very good.

Your digital Olympus equipment are obviously a fine performers and the lenses seem to be tack sharp, judging by your final results.

But I do have a question, why did you choose Olympus in this day of Nikon and Canon dominance?

Reason for my question. I'm at the point where I am deciding whether to go with Pentax (K10D), Nikon D-series, Canon or possibly even Olympus, for a D-SLR.

My concern about Olympus and Pentax is that over the next couple of years they maybe overwhelmed and swallowed up, by Canon or Nikon.
Hi!

First, thank you for your comments about the images. The trip to Paris was wonderful. I've got to get back there and see everything I missed.

If I were you I would have made the decision too and stuck with Pentax. Your committment is now paying off with the very nice bodies they have introduced and the lens announcements for next year. The K10D looks to be an awesome machine.

I am actually a former Canon owner. About 14 months ago I sold my Canon 10Dsystem and bought the Olympus setup I'm now using. I've always like Olympus and when I was at a point where I could afford to get the items I wanted, namely the 7-14 Zuiko.... I love superwide lenses, selling the Canon equipment was an obvious choice for me. One thing you can say about Canon equipment isthe higher speclenses doholdtheir value, so I did well liquidating those and had plenty with some extra cash to buy my current outfit.

I also own an E-1, but for this trip to Paris, with the combined weight of the three lenses I wanted to hold down the heft in other places, so I took my E-300 body instead and it worked out very well.

As far as any future issues with Olympus and Pentax, who knows? Right now the both are introducing new bodies and lenses and I really am not too worried about it. I doubt seriously if anyone bought either it would be Nikon or Canon. In all liklihood it would be a case similar to the Sony-Minolta collaboration. Olympus has a strong tie with Panasonic and Pentax with Samsung. If either brand were to be absorbed by someone, that's what I figure would happen. My next body purchase will in all liklihood be the Panasonic L-1. I really like that camera, and all my current stuff would be compatible.


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Old Oct 14, 2006, 2:56 PM   #9
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The subject name fits the story you conveyed perfectly well Some shots in this set wereamong the best I have seen from you. They are very demonstrative indeed. The perspective giving the massiveness of the columns in the second one , the DOF in the capture with Jeanne d'Arc and in the one before, your successful capture of the grandeur of the interior(despite some overexposure onthe centralstatues due to difficult lighting condition)are to good to beforgotten IMO...

Guess, it's time we saw the splendour of St. Peters next!!
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Old Oct 14, 2006, 4:40 PM   #10
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Greg,

Thanks for the thoughtful response. I have one digital presently, in addition to my old 35 and medium format stuff.

A couple of years ago I picked up a Panasonic P & S (DMC 80) primarily because of the Leica zoom lens. It's been a good little camera and has actually surprised me with some of the quality of pictures, considering it's a point and shooter.

I think the Panasonic/Leica equipment are quite good and the Panasonic forums seem to be full of happy photographers.

Les
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