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Old Nov 14, 2006, 9:33 PM   #11
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Being a history buff I'm always amazed at how complex, finely detailed and well done old European architecture and statues/art was done.

You have an eye, as I've said before for interesting angles. I never considered an Olympus digital SLR before, but I have to say, that due to your pix, especially the W/A shots, I'm considering the Olympus system.
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 12:11 AM   #12
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lesmore49 wrote:
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Being a history buff I'm always amazed at how complex, finely detailed and well done old European architecture and statues/art was done.

You have an eye, as I've said before for interesting angles. I never considered an Olympus digital SLR before, but I have to say, that due to your pix, especially the W/A shots, I'm considering the Olympus system.
Hi les,

Thank you very much. This has been a fun project, working all the images I took, getting them online and now, printing what I've printed. The folder that contains all the images formatted to 8.5x11 with borders andwith collages are files I have printed at home on my Canon IP6700D printer and those are now in two albums at home. I don't actually have all the images I formatted andprinted uploaded yet, and those on my website are not yet arranged in the rightorder. That will take a little while.

One of the folders on my website has a few of my favorite shots cropped and finished for printing at 16x20. I recently received the first 16x20 print from Smugmug of the view from east of Notre Dame, this onehere..



The print is awesome. I had it printed on their lustre paper and I framed it in a simple black frame with glare-free glass. It'son awall inmy workroom behind me right now and it looks great. The time on the clock located on the roofline is clearly visible..3:45pm. The actual image size is 15x19 with a 1/2 inch border and drop shadow added, and it gives the print a good look. I just skipped a mat and went with a 16x20 frame.

I've been very happy with my selection of Olympus. I was originally using Canon equipment, but when the E-1 prices fell so far I sold all my Canon stuff and bought what I had really wanted all along, plus it gave me the opportunity to get that 7-14 zoom, an incredible piece of glass. From everything I've seen and heard, the 11-22 Zuiko is just as sharp, just doesn't go quite as wide, but still it's very wide,and is available at amuch lower price.

Not all is roses with Olympus. Thereis a sacrifice in terms of performance at ISO settings of 800 and higher compared to Canon, but the type stuff I shoot does not really present enough of a problem to even think about it, I pretty much stay between ISO100-400 and always did with my Canon 10D, too. You'll see I actually took an E-300 to Paris instead of the E-1. I pickedan E-300 up as a backup, but like the lower weight so much it's become my preferred body for most everything. One thing the E-300 does not do quite as well as the E-1 is perform atISO 800- it's OK as long as you don't underexpose the image, but I still use my E-1 for sporting events when I need the higher ISO settings and in bad weather because of the E-1's gasketing. Up to ISO 400 the E-300 is great, and the newer bodies (E-500 and E-330) from what I've seenare much better performers at ISO 800.

A friend of mine last week shot some images at an evening cheerleading event of his daughter with his30D. I asked him to shoot some RAW files at ISO settings of 1600 and 3200 so I could see how far Canon has come since the 10D I used. Both of thosesettings are way better than anything Olympus can produce, but to be honest neither settings are anything you'd want to have to use much... they were far from perfect with obvious grainy patterns that didn't do well with fine detail. No matter the DSLR you choose, staying at ISO 800 or lower is still the way you need to shoot unless you're buying one of those big Canon full-frame cameras like the 5D or a 1D series. They are in another league in terms of noise because of their sensor size.I did fine at ISO 400 in Paris, which you'd seewas the fastest ISOI ever shot, and in some pretty dark places at that.
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Old Nov 15, 2006, 7:52 PM   #13
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Greg Chappell wrote:
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lesmore49 wrote:
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Being a history buff I'm always amazed at how complex, finely detailed and well done old European architecture and statues/art was done.

You have an eye, as I've said before for interesting angles. I never considered an Olympus digital SLR before, but I have to say, that due to your pix, especially the W/A shots, I'm considering the Olympus system.
Hi les,

Thank you very much. This has been a fun project, working all the images I took, getting them online and now, printing what I've printed. The folder that contains all the images formatted to 8.5x11 with borders andwith collages are files I have printed at home on my Canon IP6700D printer and those are now in two albums at home. I don't actually have all the images I formatted andprinted uploaded yet, and those on my website are not yet arranged in the rightorder. That will take a little while.

One of the folders on my website has a few of my favorite shots cropped and finished for printing at 16x20. I recently received the first 16x20 print from Smugmug of the view from east of Notre Dame, this onehere..



The print is awesome. I had it printed on their lustre paper and I framed it in a simple black frame with glare-free glass. It'son awall inmy workroom behind me right now and it looks great. The time on the clock located on the roofline is clearly visible..3:45pm. The actual image size is 15x19 with a 1/2 inch border and drop shadow added, and it gives the print a good look. I just skipped a mat and went with a 16x20 frame.

I've been very happy with my selection of Olympus. I was originally using Canon equipment, but when the E-1 prices fell so far I sold all my Canon stuff and bought what I had really wanted all along, plus it gave me the opportunity to get that 7-14 zoom, an incredible piece of glass. From everything I've seen and heard, the 11-22 Zuiko is just as sharp, just doesn't go quite as wide, but still it's very wide,and is available at amuch lower price.

Not all is roses with Olympus. Thereis a sacrifice in terms of performance at ISO settings of 800 and higher compared to Canon, but the type stuff I shoot does not really present enough of a problem to even think about it, I pretty much stay between ISO100-400 and always did with my Canon 10D, too. You'll see I actually took an E-300 to Paris instead of the E-1. I pickedan E-300 up as a backup, but like the lower weight so much it's become my preferred body for most everything. One thing the E-300 does not do quite as well as the E-1 is perform atISO 800- it's OK as long as you don't underexpose the image, but I still use my E-1 for sporting events when I need the higher ISO settings and in bad weather because of the E-1's gasketing. Up to ISO 400 the E-300 is great, and the newer bodies (E-500 and E-330) from what I've seenare much better performers at ISO 800.

A friend of mine last week shot some images at an evening cheerleading event of his daughter with his30D. I asked him to shoot some RAW files at ISO settings of 1600 and 3200 so I could see how far Canon has come since the 10D I used. Both of thosesettings are way better than anything Olympus can produce, but to be honest neither settings are anything you'd want to have to use much... they were far from perfect with obvious grainy patterns that didn't do well with fine detail. No matter the DSLR you choose, staying at ISO 800 or lower is still the way you need to shoot unless you're buying one of those big Canon full-frame cameras like the 5D or a 1D series. They are in another league in terms of noise because of their sensor size.I did fine at ISO 400 in Paris, which you'd seewas the fastest ISOI ever shot, and in some pretty dark places at that.
My wife and I are planning to go to Europe in the next few years and although I've been over there a few times in the last 30+ years, I can never get enough of the cathedrals. I'm not particularly religious, but I do admire the magnificent design and style of cathedrals. When I've gone over in the past, I've taken some pictures of Catherdral interiors with my old Pentax 35 mm and 28 mm W/A Takumar lense. Nothing to rival your fabulous shots, but I do enjoy viewing and learning from your technique.

I have been very impressed with the quality of the photos taken by your 7 -14 mm Zuiko W/A and as a result I would like a similar range W/A.

Still not sure where to go, as I have lots of Pentax equipment and that new K10D is quite tempting.

In my 35 mm days, I was never really a fan of pushing film, as I didn't care for the resulting grain. I think 400 would be about my max, as I value clarity and sharpness in photos.

Thank you for your detailed response and I hope you continue to post your work.

Les
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Old Nov 18, 2006, 6:48 PM   #14
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Greg, I enjoyed to see another impressive set featuring your style, the second one being my favourite, compositionwise
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Old Jun 29, 2007, 6:20 PM   #15
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Greg Chappell wrote:
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I spent more time taking pictures outside this awesome complex than inside. You could burn up several cards trying to capture the incredible detail of this place. Here are a few samples...

Greg,

If only I saw your pict I would have planned my visit in entirely different manner i.e. before I headed out to Israel and France in mid-May. There is no reason why I should have missed all these shots. Being in France the first time I did not feel comfortable driving or moving around. Intead a lot of time I was stuck with a tour group.
You are right: I did concentrate on the inside of the Louvre because that is part of the tour schedule. Dumb move.


Other pict I took

http://www.pbase.com/danieltong/france_trip_07


Dijon & the Lourve

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...754744#p754744


Avignon

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...52&forum_id=80

Re Notre Dame
You had great shots inside whereas I took everything outside on a cruise on River Seine. Gee I missed a lot of great shots as you said it was difficult not to be overwhelmed
Well I am planning to do another trip next yr when I fully retire

Daniel, Toronto
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 2:33 AM   #16
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Nice shots, stunning architecture.......................musket
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 2:30 PM   #17
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they good shots.
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 10:53 PM   #18
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Thanks, Guys!

Hi Daniel...there is, just so much...too much to try and pack in, in one trip. My "second shot" comes in a couple of months. We're gonna be back there in September for 15 days, staying in a rentedapartment and this time...I'm going INSIDE the Louvre(!)in addition to several other places we either didn't see at all (Rodin, Orsay)or only saw in part (such as the Invalides) in addition to several chateau's outside the city we're going to tavel to by train/bus/taxi combinations. We just bought our train and museum passes onlinetoday and started checking the regional trains to places like Fontainbleau, Chantilly and the Loire Valley.

No doubt, no matter how much planning we dowe'll come back from this trip havingmissed just as many things as we did last year.
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 8:45 AM   #19
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Greg Chappell wrote:
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Thanks, Guys!

Hi Daniel...there is, just so much...too much to try and pack in, in one trip. My "second shot" comes in a couple of months. We're gonna be back there in September for 15 days, staying in a rented¬*apartment and this time...I'm going INSIDE the Louvre(!)¬*

No doubt, no matter how much planning we do¬*we'll come back from this trip having¬*missed just as many things as we did last year.
Grag

If time management happens to be important, it is not a bad idea to skip the Lourve (inside)

Going in Sept which is still a hot season, there will be crowd. And I mean a lot like what you see in Times Square anytime of the day.

I would have taken this pict with its lower portion if not for a fact that I could not avoid people for a whole 15 minutes .



You have a nice trip and no doubt if you will post a lot of great pict like what you did the last time

Daniel, Toronto
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 10:27 AM   #20
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a real nice set of shots, #3 is a great shot - love the hole, but they are all excellent, the one on your wall is classic
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