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Old Jul 16, 2005, 3:42 PM   #1
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Three images selected from my wanders at the Arts&Craft show.

Of the 100 or so vendors selling kick-nacks and crafts made of wood , metal and string, 7 were trying to peddle photgraphy.

They did not seem to want anyone taking pictures so all images were shot "from the hip" with a Nikon 5400 P&S.

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Got the discussions I wanted, so :
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Old Jul 16, 2005, 3:43 PM   #2
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Old Jul 16, 2005, 3:43 PM   #3
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Old Jul 19, 2005, 7:02 PM   #4
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You could be in serious trouble with posting these shots. It is fairly standard policy that photography is not permitted at arts and craft sales and fairs. The vendors do not want their art copied. Shooting from the hip does not make it legal. If someone from the show sees these pictures, you may be asked to remove them.

It is one thing the to take pictures where they have been prohibited. It is quite another thing to publish those pictures for the world to see. In the first case, nobody will know unless you tell someone. In the second case, you are telling the world, "Hey, look what I did!"

Be careful or you may find yourself in deep doo-doo.

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Old Jul 19, 2005, 9:26 PM   #5
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These fairs are set up in public parks, and nothing I have done with the images is "for profit".
So now you want to add shooting in a public place to the list of things that should not be permitted? I don't think so, if this is so anybody trying any kind of street photography better give it up.

BTW: This show which was invading a local nature park I like to visit, did not try to prohibit cameras, the vendors did not like it. Pretty much the same welcome I got when I tried to take some images at a carnival midway, the carnies were not pleased and made unusual suggestions on what to do with the camera, the carnival was also setup on public grounds.


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Old Jul 20, 2005, 3:08 AM   #6
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Well, I'm going to an arts festival at the end of September. Its the largest or second largert one in the country at the moment, so this will be interesting. I dont think they will be so anal about it tho, except maybe if I put up a tripod to trymake a perfect copy of someone elses art.

I have to agree with PeterP, none of the photos he took can be used to copy someone else's work. Its not like he can use PS to copy a photo in one of his poto's, blow it up, frame it and hang it on his wall without it looking horrible.

His photos was a legit photo of the area and the people going about their bussiness in a public place. Not a photo of their art.
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Old Jul 20, 2005, 1:05 PM   #7
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It doesn't matter that the show is on public property and it is not the government that prohibits photography at these shows. It is the vendors and the show organizers that set these prohibitions.

Every weekend, there is a huge arts/crafts show and market held in downtown Portland, Oregon called "Saturday Market". It is held on public property. If you walk through there with a camera hanging around your neck with the lens cap on, nobody will say a word. If you take the lens cap off and point the camera anywhere in the show area, one of the vendors will most likely stop you.

This has nothing to do with security or 9/11. This policy has been in effect since long before 9/11 occured. You will find similar prohibitions in shopping malls and individual shops. Many shops selling art in various forms prohibit photography on their premises.

As I said in my previous post. Use caution and a little common sense. It never hurts to ask permission. If the answer is no, they probably won't ask you to leave but will simply request that you don't take pictures. If they catch you doing it covertly, at the very least, they will probably ask you to leave.

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Old Jul 20, 2005, 1:48 PM   #8
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Exactly:!:,

The operative key-word here is this was on public land.

shopping malls=private land,
shops = private land,
store on their own premises = private land.
Absolutely no argument there, they have the right to expect privacy and prohibt photography on or of their own premises.

These art fairs set up on public lands, and anyone on public land can have no expectation of privacy. If they want their privacy, then they should not be on public lands.

And as I said even the event organizers did not try to prevent photography.
Just some individuals who thought otherwise, in fact none of the people in the attached images objected, the whines came from some of the other stalls selling the glued together wood and string bits.

So long as it is "not for profit", or banned by some government regulation there is nothing to prevent anyone from taking images in a public place.
Otherwise any and every image-op that contains people you don't know in it becomes un-takeable(is that a word?)

Then again I'm in Canada, maybe our definitions of "public areas", "rights to privacy" and "freedoms of expression" are different here.


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It doesn't matter that the show is on public property
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You will find similar prohibitions in shopping malls and individual shops. Many shops selling art in various forms prohibit photography on their premises.
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Old Jul 20, 2005, 2:54 PM   #9
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Just one final comment. Even if a show is held on publicly owned property, the show organizers have rented or leased that property for the duration of the show. During that time period, they make the rules.

On the other hand, if the public entity that owns the land is the one hosting the show, what you say is probably true.

I don't think things are that different between Canada and the USA. FWIW, I like Canada! I've been to B.C. many times and hope for many more trips in the future.

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Old Jul 22, 2005, 4:50 AM   #10
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Most of these shows are not on private land, nor do they rent the land from the local authorities. They are generally given permission to set up there, once they cater for rubbish and don't damage anything. The local authorities let them there for free because it provides entertainment for the community, not because they get paid for it.
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