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Old Sep 24, 2006, 10:25 PM   #1
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http://www.airtightinteractive.com/projects/autoviewer/

I found the perfect thing for putting up photos on mysite!, but it has a right click function that allows you to open the picture in a new window, does anyone know if their is any free software out their that allows you to put pictures up without people being able to download them!?

ps: I know you can purchase the full autoviewer for $45 but I cant even afford that right now.

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Old Sep 25, 2006, 12:01 AM   #2
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I don't know about perfect. In fact, I think I'll send them an e-mail complaing about false advertising right now, since their web site says this:
  • Quote:
    Cross platform - Windows/Macintosh/Linux (requires Flash 8 or higher).
    [/*]
  • Quote:
    Flash 8 detection. Users without Flash 8 are redirected to an upgrade page.
    [/*]
http://www.airtightinteractive.com/projects/autoviewer/

That's not true at all. There is no Flash 8 for Linux. The latest Flash Player for Linux is Version 7. So, how can it be usable by Linux users if it requires Flash 8? lol

They probably don't realize that, since Adobe markets Flash as being cross platform.

But, in reality, it's not, since they have yet to release anything newer than Flash Player 7 for Linux (even though Flash 9 is out for Windows now).

As a result, any site that requires Flash 8 or 9 to see content, is locking out millions of Linux users. I hate sites that use Flash for displaying images anyway. But, maybe that's just me. If I see too much flash (pun intended) when I got to a photo gallery, I'll exit it without bothering to look at the images.

As for keeping anyone from downloading an image, there really isn't anything you can do about that part. If they can see it, they can save it.

There is some javascript around that prevents someone from right clicking on an image and downloading one. But, it's easily bypassed:

http://www.webdeveloper.com/forum/ar...p/t-87939.html

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Old Sep 25, 2006, 12:12 AM   #3
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thanks Jim, I realy get what your saying about flash, I personaly hate it to!!.... I guess I will just stick to my Wordpress/Pixelpost based site

their is just some picutres I'd rather people dint have, but got to see :P
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Old Sep 25, 2006, 12:26 AM   #4
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I do see some nicely done sites with Flash from time to time. But, I see some very irritating ones, too.

So, if a site is too "flashy", I just exit it. Again, that might just be me. I've got a grudge against it anyway, since my Wife is running Linux on her laptop and gripes about not being able to see "The Fan" at Comcast.net (our ISP), which now requires Flash 8 Player to see the content.

I run Linux more than I do Windows anymore lately, too. So, a site that requires Flash 8 Player is automatically placed on my you know what list. I guess it's really Adobe's fault.

I did find one solution that works "so so". You can install Wine (a product that lets you run Windows apps under Linux) and use Firefox for Windows with Flash 9 Player for Windows with it.

But, fonts are all messed up on some sites that way, and it tends to crash frequently on a number of sites, too. So, a native Linux solution is really needed, and Adobe has yet to release anything newer than Flash Player 7 for Linux, even though they're marketing Flash as being Cross Platform.

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Old Sep 25, 2006, 12:34 AM   #5
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I've often wanted to try out linux, I've had a copy of redhat(>?) for six years and never installed it.... do you think I should give it a bash?... what are the pro's of using it? we already know some of the cons hehe
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Old Sep 25, 2006, 1:07 AM   #6
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Well, you've got tons of free software out there for Linux (including some pretty decent image editing tools anymore).

My main reason is that I don't like Microsoft's way of doing business with it's proprietary file formats, Genuine Windows authentication software, etc.

Of course, you don't have the security headaches with Linux either (viruses, spyware, etc.). Linux designed to be more secure from the ground up. lol

The easiest one to try with pretty good functionality in SimplyMEPIS.

It can run from a Live CD (although it's pretty slow that way). So, you can try it to see if you like it, and make sure it works with your hardware before installing it.

But, there are hundreds of different Linux Distributions available, with a variety of different "looks and feels". You can find some info on popular distros at http://www.distrowatch.com

So, you can't just try one and decide if you like Linux or not.

There are many differences between them (look and feel, applicatoins included, plugins and codecs installed, menu layouts, totally different window managers, printer support, etc.).

I'm setup in a triboot configuration with Windows XP Pro, SimplyMEPIS 6.0, and Kanotix 2006-01-RC1 on my PC right now.

If you've already got a larger hard drive with Windows on it, you can make some room on it for Linux using available partitioning tools in most distros to resize your NTFS partition.

For example, if you have a drive in it that has 20GB of free space, make the NTFS partition smaller and create a new partition for Linux on the same drive.

A distro like SimplyMEPIS can do that for you using QTParted (a partitioning tool in the distro). Then, it can set it for dual boot (and it does that by default if you don't use the entire drive).

Basically, you boot from a live cd, run QTParted (or GParted in some of the other distros around), and you can resize your NTFS partition (shrink it, freeing up some of the space used by it).

Then, create partitions for Linux (for example, a ResierFS partition and a Swap Partition). It's a good idea to give a Linux distro a swap partition to use, too.

Here is are instructions on resizing an NTFS partition using the QTParted tool included on the SimplyMEPIS Live CDs:

http://www.mepis.org/docs/index.php/...our_hard_drive

Then, when installing, it will see the Windows Paritition and give you a menu choice upon bootup that lets you pick either Windows or Linux. So, you can enjoy both on one hard disk. It uses a boot manager called GRUB that it can install in your Master Boot Record. That's what I use on my PC to allow me to boot into multiple operating systems.

SimplyMEPIS has already got most browser plugins and codecs already installed, with pretty good support for newer printers and monitors (including things like the HP Printer Toolbox already installed for checking ink levels, aligning heads, etc.), as well as Firefox, Open Office, and many other tools you'd find very useful compared to similar tools in Windows. It's a very complete distro.

Many Linux distros won't include proprietary drivers and codecs (because they want to keep everything in them open source). You still have to install some things yourself (they aren't allowed to distribute codecs for some file types because of license restrictions). But, it's no big deal to install them yourself.

Here is a recent review of SimplyMEPIS 6.0:

http://raldztech.blogspot.com/2006/0...esktop-on.html

Download links are here (it's free):

http://www.mepis.org/node/1462

P.S.


Image Editing tools for Linux are making a lot of progress now, too. Krita (an image editor included with KOffice) now has support for 16 bit editing and color management (ICC Profiles) via LIttleCMS. It's a little rough around the edges, but it's well integrated into the KDE Office Suite and is coming along nicely.

The Gimp is a popular choice for image editing for Linux users and UFRaw can be used to handle raw conversion. UFRaw has pretty good demosaic algorithms that are based on David Coffin's dcraw.c

Eric Hyman's Bibble is also available for Linux and is a pretty good tool for raw conversion.

You can also get a number of Windows applications to run under Linux via Wine (a project that allows Windows apps to run under Linux -- sometimes faster than they do under Windows).

Google has also released a Linux version of Picasa that includes a run time version of Wine.

I've also been playing with Lightzone for Linux ((free for LInux, but the Windows and Mac versions are currently $149.95 from http://www.lightcrafts.com/ ).

Digikam (a popular tool for basic browsing and Image Editing for Linux) just went to 16 bit editing with their newest release, and all plugins were ported to 16 bit, and color management is now supported, too. I been experimenting with this tool to do some noise reduction, sharpening, etc. on a few photos and it seems to work quite well.

Lack of 16 bit editing and color management has been a complaint of Linux users in the past, but it looks like most of the popular tools are converting over to support these features now.

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