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Old Nov 4, 2009, 11:43 AM   #1
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Default Widescreen Digital SLR

I recently bought a Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS which has the 16:9 Widescreen option and love it!

Now I'm looking at buying a digital SLR and really want the widescreen feature. I'm having a hard time finding any SLR cameras that can do widescreen. Do they exist? If so, can someone recommend any? Any reason why it's hard to find this feature?
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Old Nov 4, 2009, 11:54 AM   #2
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I do not believe you will find a 16:9 aspect ratio on any current dslr. Please note that you can easily crop your resultant pictures to this aspect ratio. And with the resolution of current DSLRs, it would not be a problem.

the micro 4/3 syste including the Panasonic G1/GH1/GF1 and Olympus E-P1, not a true DSLRs, but an interchangeable large sensor cameras offer multi-aspect ratio shooting in either 3:2, 4:3, 16:9. You may have a look into these. They are more compact and lack an optical viewfinder. But offer dslr-like image quality, at an expense of some shot-shot performance and ability to shoot action.
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Old Nov 4, 2009, 1:00 PM   #3
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Most dSLRs have image sensors that have a native aspect ratio of 3:2. The ones that don't use image sensors with a native aspect ratio of 4:3. While some dLSRs, like some of Sony's for instance, can record images with an aspect ratio of 16:9, they do so by cropping off the top and bottom in the camera. A severe drawback of htis method is that the view in the optical viewfinder continues to show the subject in the 3:2 viewfinder, so composing a 16:9 image in a 3:2 viewfinder is less than ideal.

But as Hards80 mentioned, you can always crop your images the way you want later.
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Old Nov 4, 2009, 2:17 PM   #4
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Thanks for the replies. The camera would be for semi-work purposes and would be taking thousands of pictures. Cropping and resizing each one would not be ideal unless I can find a way to automate it.
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Old Nov 4, 2009, 2:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jprom View Post
Thanks for the replies. The camera would be for semi-work purposes and would be taking thousands of pictures. Cropping and resizing each one would not be ideal unless I can find a way to automate it.
There are several applications that make it quite easy, and some that can automate the process. Adobe Photoshop Elements has a function called Process Multiple Files... which can do what you want. But again, precisely composing a 16:9 image in a 3:2 viewfinder might be tough. You might not want to batch process all your images.
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