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Old Dec 5, 2012, 6:08 AM   #1
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Default Nikon L810? L310?

Hey Guy, I'm interested to buy A Bridge Camera, But I was torn between Nikon Coolpix L310 And L810. Whats are Their Pros and Cons?
Is there any more camera that are Bridge and have the same price point as those stated above?
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 7:06 AM   #2
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Would you want to use the camera in Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority or Manual mode?

If so, you may want to consider the Nikon P510.

Looks the same, a bit more expensive, but if you really want to play around with the camera it will give you more control.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 7:44 AM   #3
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:| its kinda expensive. Im not too sure. Any camera that has the same or below the price point of those two models? On a tight budget :|
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 8:43 AM   #4
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Yeah. I only ask that question because a couple of friends came up and asked me about the Nikon Lxxx series a while ago. I asked them the same question. One said that they would never want to learn more about cameras and went with the Lxxx series. The other said they didn't know it didn't have the more advanced exposure modes and went with the Nikon P500 (the P510 wasn't out then.)

Same camera. Two different people. Two different opinions. Both perfectly happy with their decision.

What is it about the Nikon L310 / L810 that you like?

What type of pictures are you planning to take?

How do you rank the importance of the features of a camera?

If you have a tight budget, I would suggest doing your homework on what features will let you do what, but also if you have to choose one feature over another, which features are more important to you.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 9:00 AM   #5
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Yeah. I only ask that question because a couple of friends came up and asked me about the Nikon Lxxx series a while ago. I asked them the same question. One said that they would never want to learn more about cameras and went with the Lxxx series. The other said they didn't know it didn't have the more advanced exposure modes and went with the Nikon P500 (the P510 wasn't out then.)

Same camera. Two different people. Two different opinions. Both perfectly happy with their decision.

What is it about the Nikon L310 / L810 that you like?

What type of pictures are you planning to take?

How do you rank the importance of the features of a camera?

If you have a tight budget, I would suggest doing your homework on what features will let you do what, but also if you have to choose one feature over another, which features are more important to you.
Hmm. Im planning to take landscape, evening shots, sunsets, macro , food. I want like slow shutter speeds like able to capture like water droplets of a water fountain, super zoom.

The rank of the features if its 1-5 I will choose 3,4.

As I'm a teen , I have a very tight budget.
I want to get features that is part point and shoot and DSLR.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 10:16 AM   #6
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Just thinking.

Do you have a camera now?

Do you have access to any old cameras?

Somebody you know probably has a camera that is collecting dust on a shelf somewhere. They may be willing to just give it to you if they see that you are interested in photography. [Or at least give it to you for really cheap.]

If you can get a cheap camera to start out, and then figure out how you want to use the camera, it may help really solidify what is important to you and then you will be more clear on what camera you want next. [And you will have had time to save up some more.]
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 10:27 AM   #7
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Just thinking.

Do you have a camera now?

Do you have access to any old cameras?

Somebody you know probably has a camera that is collecting dust on a shelf somewhere. They may be willing to just give it to you if they see that you are interested in photography. [Or at least give it to you for really cheap.]

If you can get a cheap camera to start out, and then figure out how you want to use the camera, it may help really solidify what is important to you and then you will be more clear on what camera you want next. [And you will have had time to save up some more.]

Nope.
None of my family has one. Even if they have it's a point and shoot and it's malfunctioning.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 11:42 AM   #8
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Well, here's the thing (IMHO).

From the sounds of it, it sounds like you want to be creative and potentially learn about photography. (From what you've posted above and the fact that you've actually posted this question here on a photography forum.)

The thing about the Nikon L310 or L810 is that its not really a bridge camera. At least not in my mind of what a bridge camera is.

To me, a bridge camera not only looks like a dSLR, but also has more of the advanced control of a dSLR such as Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, Manual exposure. More buttons to change these settings. The power of a dSLR or bridge camera is that when you have learnt about photography and know how aperture, shutter speed (and iso) affect your picture, you might want to force your camera to a specific setting. You can do this with the "advanced", "bridge" or "dSLR" cameras, where as you might not be able to do that with a "point-and-shoot" camera.

The thing is, if you don't ever want to learn about things like aperture, shutter speed or iso, then a Nikon L310 / L810 will be great. It will let you take great pictures. But if you do end up wanting to learn about aperture, shutter speed and iso, then these cameras won't let you directly change these settings on the camera.

So if you buy a point-and-shoot like a Nikon L310 / L810 and then end up wanting to learn more advanced things in photography, you will have to buy another camera down the road. If you are on a limited budget, and have spent your money on a Nikon L310 / L810 and then decide it is not the camera for you, then you don't have money to put towards another camera.

Other cameras to consider (IMHO) would be the Canon SX240HS or a Panasonic ZS15 for cameras that have more manual control, but not as much zoom. And they don't look like a dSLR. But because they are smaller, you might be more apt to have the camera with you and find yourself shooting more?

The other option is to buy used. I know a lot of people warn against this. But where I live (Toronto) there are a couple of really reputable camera stores that sell the used gear that gets traded in and give you a 90 day warranty.

I could probably walk in and get a Canon XT for $150 and add an 18-55mm for $50 more or so. That could be a great camera to really start exploring on.

I ended up picking up a Pentax ist DS for $80 the other day. I put a Pentax-A 50mm f2.0 lens on it that I had grabbed for $15. Tossed in a 2gig SDCard and 4xAA batteries and I was up and running. [That's my current walk around have some fun camera.]

Don't get me wrong. I like point-and-shoot cameras. I've been shooting with them since the Kodak DC240. And over the past year and a bit been shooting with them more to purposely get away from thinking about aperture, shutter speed, etc and just trying to force myself to "look around" more. But then again, when I want to do something more advanced and my point-and-shoot camera doesn't let me do it, I just put it away and grab one of my dSLRs.

The problem is there are so many options. You can pick one based on price. Or features. Or how it looks. But the more cameras I go through, the more I realize I'm now picking cameras based on what type of shot I want to get and how I want to use the camera. Once I've figured out what I want to do, then the camera options seem to get narrowed down.

If you don't know where you want to explore, either get something really cheap, knowing that you will probably outgrow it and be looking at your next camera soon. Or get something that you can grow into.

Sorry for it being too long.

But I'm thinking . . . If I had the smarts to ask about cameras before I got my first one, I would hope someone would try to help out.

Last edited by tacticdesigns; Dec 5, 2012 at 12:03 PM. Reason: typo
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 12:16 PM   #9
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Wow thanks for the advice, how about the canon powershot SX 150 and 160 IS. The super zoom is not really a need, its more like a want. And im not sure about stores in my country.
About learning those ISO, aperture and shutter speeds it kinda confusing. Trying to learn though.



edit: I Heard from my friends saying that high ISO is good for taking night shots. Is it sufficient for a camera with max 800 or 1600? Both canon models max out at those 2 ISO levels.

Last edited by tayfelix; Dec 5, 2012 at 12:20 PM.
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Old Dec 5, 2012, 12:28 PM   #10
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edit: I Heard from my friends saying that high ISO is good for taking night shots. Is it sufficient for a camera with max 800 or 1600? Both canon models max out at those 2 ISO levels.
The other thing is that there is this trend away from CCD to BSI CMOS. It's supposed to be better for higher iso, which is handy for night shots. And for freezing action shots. I think the Canons that you just mentioned have CCDs where as the SX XXX HS cameras have the newer BSI CMOS sensors.
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