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Old Dec 3, 2016, 1:15 PM   #1
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Default Any recommendations on a DSLR camera comparable to Nikon D800

Hello would anyone of any DSLR camera which are less than in price but equal to the image quality achieved by the Nikon D800 ?

I was told by a Nikon sales representative that the D600 uses the exact same lens and can take equal quality pictures as the D800 camera and is much cheaper at around $1500 USD Could there be any other DSLR full frame cameras that can match or exceed the image quality (monumental) of the D800 ?
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Old Dec 3, 2016, 4:05 PM   #2
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I was told by a Nikon sales representative that the D600 uses the exact same lens and can take equal quality pictures as the D800 camera and is much cheaper at around $1500 USD Could there be any other DSLR full frame cameras that can match or exceed the image quality (monumental) of the D800 ?
The D800/D800E/D810 uses a 36MP image sensor, while the D600/D610/D750 use a 24MP sensor. While they both use the same lenses, they don't take equal quality pictures. There are several other differences between them that make the D800 (et. al.) a superior camera when compared to the D600 (et. al.).

What do you want to shoot?
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Old Dec 4, 2016, 10:55 AM   #3
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If you are not invested in Nikon lenses you might consider the Pentax K-1 which uses the same sensor as the D810. Surf for some reviews and comparisons. Just my $0.02.
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Old Dec 4, 2016, 6:56 PM   #4
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I'd like to add that, if you're new to dSLRs and photography, perhaps the D800, D600 or K-1 might be overkill and provide a steeper learning curve than a D7200 or K-3.

What do you want to shoot?
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Old Dec 4, 2016, 9:07 PM   #5
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The D800/D800E/D810 uses a 36MP image sensor, while the D600/D610/D750 use a 24MP sensor. While they both use the same lenses, they don't take equal quality pictures. There are several other differences between them that make the D800 (et. al.) a superior camera when compared to the D600 (et. al.).

What do you want to shoot?
Hello and thanks for the reply. I am a newbie to DSLR cameras. I have only taken interest in DSLR cameras coming from a point and shoot camera. I would like to shoot far away bodies of mountain and water and macro type shots of electronic chips and circuit boards, flowers and so on...
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Old Dec 4, 2016, 9:09 PM   #6
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If you are not invested in Nikon lenses you might consider the Pentax K-1 which uses the same sensor as the D810. Surf for some reviews and comparisons. Just my $0.02.
Thanks for the reply. Does same sensor = equal picture quality ? Wouldn't same sensor and same lens = identical picture quality given all other variables are equal ?
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Old Dec 5, 2016, 9:58 AM   #7
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... I would like to shoot far away bodies of mountain and water and macro type shots of electronic chips and circuit boards, flowers and so on...
Clearly, you want the most detail you can achieve with the best camera and lenses, and since you were asking about less expensive alternatives to the $2,000+ D800, you have a finite amount of money to spend.

Nikon makes two product lines of dSLRs, the FX product line which uses a 36 mm by 24 mm image sensor (the same size as a 35 mm film exposure, and often referred to generically as 'Full Frame'), and the DX product line which uses a 24mm by 16 mm image sensor (simply referred to generically as 'APS-C' because it is similar to the Advanced Photo System's 'C', or 'Classic', image format.)

'APS-C' cameras, by virtue of their physically smaller image sensors, provide a narrower angle of view that 'Full Frame' cameras, when both cameras use the same focal length lenses. That is, when an APS-C camera has a 100 mm lens attached, it provides an angle of view equivalent to a 150 mm lens on a 'Full Frame' camera. In addition, because 'Full Frame' image sensors are larger, lenses for them require more complex (read "expensive") lenses to achieve the same image quality (with respect to vignetting, distortion, field curvature and chromatic aberration) as lenses designed exclusively for APS-C cameras which project a smaller image. In addition, APS-C cameras make excellent use of 'Full Frame' lenses by excluding the portions of their projected image that are likely to contain one of more of these flaws from the final capture.

So, in addition to 'Full Frame' cameras costing a lot more than APS-C cameras, 'Full Frame' lenses of equivalent quality are also more expensive, if they are actually available which isn't always true.

Of course, supporters of the 'Full frame' format will respond to this limitation by saying that offending portions of a 'Full Frame' image can simply be cropped off, but the APS-C format automatically crops them off for you, and when you crop a 'Full Frame' image, the result is a lower resolution image. For instance, when a 36 megapixel image (7360 x 4912) is cropped to the equivalent APS-C size, the result is a 15 megapixel image (4800 x 3200), which is well below the 24 megapixel images (6000 x 4000) that current APS-C cameras can capture. So given the same lenses, an APS-C camera will provide you with more detail than a 'Full Frame' camera, and to match the image quality you'd get from an APS-C camera, you'd need much better, much more expensive lenses IF they are available.

That is not to say that 'Full Frame' cameras aren't without their virtues. 'Full Frame' cameras generally have less image noise and higher dynamic range than APS-C cameras, and by virtue of their larger image sensors, they also have a more shallow Depth of Field, but the difference is usually only 1 to 1.5 stops.

So perhaps your goals for photography would be better fulfilled with a much less expensive APS-C camera and associated lenses.
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Old Dec 5, 2016, 3:20 PM   #8
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BTW, while Nikon's top-of-the-line 'Full Frame' dSLR contains a 36MP image sensor, Sony's has a 42MP sensor and Canon's has a 50MP sensor. And while these are capable of capturing greater detail than Nikon's, they still can't capture the detail that a 24MP APS-C camera can with the same lens.
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Old Dec 6, 2016, 12:31 AM   #9
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DSLR cameras http://thedigitalcamera.net/best-dslr-cameras-for-beginners/
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Old Dec 7, 2016, 1:10 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by TCav View Post
Clearly, you want the most detail you can achieve with the best camera and lenses, and since you were asking about less expensive alternatives to the $2,000+ D800, you have a finite amount of money to spend.

Nikon makes two product lines of dSLRs, the FX product line which uses a 36 mm by 24 mm image sensor (the same size as a 35 mm film exposure, and often referred to generically as 'Full Frame'), and the DX product line which uses a 24mm by 16 mm image sensor (simply referred to generically as 'APS-C' because it is similar to the Advanced Photo System's 'C', or 'Classic', image format.)

'APS-C' cameras, by virtue of their physically smaller image sensors, provide a narrower angle of view that 'Full Frame' cameras, when both cameras use the same focal length lenses. That is, when an APS-C camera has a 100 mm lens attached, it provides an angle of view equivalent to a 150 mm lens on a 'Full Frame' camera. In addition, because 'Full Frame' image sensors are larger, lenses for them require more complex (read "expensive") lenses to achieve the same image quality (with respect to vignetting, distortion, field curvature and chromatic aberration) as lenses designed exclusively for APS-C cameras which project a smaller image. In addition, APS-C cameras make excellent use of 'Full Frame' lenses by excluding the portions of their projected image that are likely to contain one of more of these flaws from the final capture.

So, in addition to 'Full Frame' cameras costing a lot more than APS-C cameras, 'Full Frame' lenses of equivalent quality are also more expensive, if they are actually available which isn't always true.

Of course, supporters of the 'Full frame' format will respond to this limitation by saying that offending portions of a 'Full Frame' image can simply be cropped off, but the APS-C format automatically crops them off for you, and when you crop a 'Full Frame' image, the result is a lower resolution image. For instance, when a 36 megapixel image (7360 x 4912) is cropped to the equivalent APS-C size, the result is a 15 megapixel image (4800 x 3200), which is well below the 24 megapixel images (6000 x 4000) that current APS-C cameras can capture. So given the same lenses, an APS-C camera will provide you with more detail than a 'Full Frame' camera, and to match the image quality you'd get from an APS-C camera, you'd need much better, much more expensive lenses IF they are available.

That is not to say that 'Full Frame' cameras aren't without their virtues. 'Full Frame' cameras generally have less image noise and higher dynamic range than APS-C cameras, and by virtue of their larger image sensors, they also have a more shallow Depth of Field, but the difference is usually only 1 to 1.5 stops.

So perhaps your goals for photography would be better fulfilled with a much less expensive APS-C camera and associated lenses.
Hello and thank you for the details response. Since I'm very much new to DSLR and the terms quoted above I'll spend my time understanding what they mean. I also agree that buying a DSLR camera may be steep learning curve not to mention the steep price of the D800. You also had mentioned then Pentax digital camera as a good choice yes ? What other APS-C camera would you recommend that could provide nearly identical quality images as the D800 camera and in your recommendation could you specify what lens should I buy along side the camera body ? Yes I do have a budget and would like to spend less than $800 - $850 USD. I want the flexibility of taking far away shots such as mountain hills, lake bodies and up close macro shots of flowers, integrated circuit chips and so on.

Thanks again
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