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Old Jan 21, 2017, 7:29 PM   #1
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Default Help with Camera selection for business application

I am looking for a digital camera to capture before and after pictures of our work.

We own a commercial and residential painting company. We would like to demonstrate the value we provide to our customers refreshing theirs homes or businesses when delivering these painting services. Meaning, that we need to capture a room or exterior that is in need of paint and then demonstrate the value we provide once it is freshly painted. We will provide these shots to our customers after we complete the work and will also use these for marketing purposes

The subject may range from small interior rooms to large external multi-story structures.

My preference would be to use a P&S digital camera rather than having to switch out lens at the customer location because we don't always have a lot of time on the job site for this purpose.

I may be wrong here but instinctively I believe I need a camera with very good color reproduction capabilities as well as being able to capture wide angle views. Also, we don't have much control over the lighting at our job sites so at times we may have poor lighting conditions. While this is valuable to my business, I would like to try to stay below an MSRP of $500.

Any help on options would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
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Old Jan 22, 2017, 9:11 AM   #2
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I may be wrong here but instinctively I believe I need a camera with very good color reproduction capabilities ...
Almost all digital cameras use digital image sensors that are paired with Bayer filters. Since, without a Bayer filter, conventional image sensors only capture luminance, a Bayer filter is required for these image sensors to distinguish colors. For your purposes, this system would do well under most circumstances. There is one circumstance that it might not do well for you though. The Bayer filter splits the image into red, green, and blue colors, such that values from some photosensors that are under red filters interpret the long wavelengths of light within the visible spectrum, photosensors under green filters interpret medium wavelengths, and blue filters interpret short wavelengths. Problems can arise when a pure color with a very short wavelength that the human eye would interpret as violet or purple, digital cameras will interpret as simply blue. This doesn't happen often, but it does happen, and no camera that uses a Bayer filter is immune to it.

An alternative to using an image sensor paired with a Bayer filter is the Foveon sensor, which operates differently. While this violet-blue shift doesn't occur often, it's not possible to say for certain that it won't happen with a Foveon sensor, but it is probably less likely. But even at that, however it is gathered, color data is stored as combinations of red, green and blue, so Foveon sensors may preserve color information for pure violet, but it may not be able to store it. Even so, digital cameras that use the Foveon image sensor would put you way over budget anyway.

Another consideration with respect to color reproduction capabilities is the color temperature of the light in the environment of the scene. Shooting outdoors will generally result in correct color reproduction, but different types of interior lighting can distort the color a camera senses. White Balance (or Color Balance) is a feature of all digital cameras, but some types of lighting, and especially mixed types of lighting, can confound efforts to accurately reproduce colors.

Lastly, we perceive projected colors differently than we do reflected colors, so that colors on a TV or monitor will appear different from the same colors on a printed photograph or the actual scene. So long as your images aren't shown to potential customers with access to the original scene, however, this shouldn't be a problem.

I mention all this to show that your stated goal may not provide exactly the results you expect. It's probably more important for your customers to pick colors from color sample books than from any digital images you, or anybody else, could have captured.
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Old Jan 23, 2017, 7:09 AM   #3
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Diplomat- for interior's you'll need a fairly wide lens and ideally be pretty fast (large aperture)- plus a decent sensor for good colour reproduction and decent high-iso performance.
If you want to have something compact- perhaps consider Panasonic's LX10 (LX15) in some markets or Canon's G7X II...
Both offer decent resolution, both a fast AND wide 24mm lens- and both with a 1" sensor- which will help offer more depth of field when shooting wide open- which I suspect you'll need for interior work...
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Old Jan 23, 2017, 11:44 PM   #4
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Hi everyone.
I decided to join here so I can ask other enthusiasts for advice.
I already have my cameras. I am looking to buy a tripod so I searched the net for comments and opinions of other users so I will know which one to buy.
I read this review and it lists out a couple of tripods but I have no idea
which one is good to buy. Can anyone help me out?
Tripod review
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Old Jan 24, 2017, 4:13 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by daddy2kids View Post
Hi everyone.
I decided to join here so I can ask other enthusiasts for advice.
I already have my cameras. I am looking to buy a tripod so I searched the net for comments and opinions of other users so I will know which one to buy.
I read this review and it lists out a couple of tripods but I have no idea
which one is good to buy. Can anyone help me out?
Tripod review
You posted your question within a topic created by another member where he was asking about cameras.

Your question about tripods isn't likely to get much attention here. You would be much better off by posting your question in its own topic on the appropriate forum.
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Old Jan 24, 2017, 6:41 PM   #6
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Thanks for all the input. I will check out the specific models mentioned.
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