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Old Jun 4, 2004, 4:40 PM   #11
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cosize

Was thison glossy paper?
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Old Jun 8, 2004, 1:03 PM   #12
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It was matte -V- matte but I think the Epson does better black and white
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Old Jun 15, 2004, 10:18 AM   #13
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Hi Steve,

Thanks for a great site. I always enjoy your reviews. However I have one suggestion: when you review a printer like the Canon i9900, I bet we are a lot of readers, who wonder "well, how does it compare to the Epson 2200?".

By comparing reviews it is possible to draw conclusions regarding speed, fade resistance etc. But how does it compare in terms of color gamut andsubjective print quality (if you look at a Epson 2200 print next to the Canon i9900 - can you see with your naked eye that the Canon has smaller drops and better resolution? is it more smooth/sharp or how would you describe the differences?).

A lot of people looking at this kind of printer will want to experiment with different media - how heavy fine art papers were you able to feed the i9900 ?(it seems that it might be limited as it has only on paper path). Is it more dificult to profile the Canon printer than the Epson for different matte papers?

Again, I your site is my preferred site and I am very happy you don't neglect reviewing printers, like so many other digital photography sites. But the above are just a few questions I would love to hear your oppiion on.

Best regards,

Tore
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Old Jun 16, 2004, 6:26 PM   #14
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I wish that we could do that kind of comparison but the problem is that we no longer have the Epson 2200 printer here, we only get these things for 30-day loans and then they go back. The Epson is much more capable if you want to print on a variety of paper stocks, especially fine art type papers. The Canon printers are really only designed for glossy or matte photo paper and lack a straight-thru paper path so thickness is also a concern.

Apples to apples - comparing glossy photo prints on comparable paper stock - I would be hard pressed to take one over the other - they both make wonderful prints with a wide color gamut. With the i9900 I might have to give it an edge with reds and greens with the additional inks but not as much as one might expect, the Epson 2200 produces excellent colors too.

To my eyes I have seen little difference in display-size (13x19") prints between the 2pl and 4pl ink droplets. You can see it with a loupe but not at arms-length or from several feet away. For speed of printing the Canons rule, no doubt about that.

As for longevity of prints, I don't know who to believe anymore. I have both types of prints (dye and pigment based) hanging on mywalls and they get lots of Florida sunlight exposure and neither have faded noticeably. It's been a little over two years since the Epson 2200 prints were made and over a year for the Canon i9100 prints. Both types of prints are dry mounted on foamcore with no overcoat or any type of additional UV protection.

-Steve
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Old Jun 16, 2004, 8:54 PM   #15
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Steve, since you mentioned mounting, can I use my Seal hot press to mount prints from the Canon paper just as I used to do with silver based paper, or will I get a sticky, melted mess?

If no, what do people use to mount ink jet photos these days?

Thanks

Deane
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Old Jun 17, 2004, 10:10 AM   #16
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I've used the hot laminator. It works fine but make sure the ink is dry.
I wait a couple days before laminating. If you do it to soon the paper will warp. Very noticable warp on a 8 by 10 if you rush it.
Also depends on what kind of paper you use.
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Old Aug 16, 2004, 12:14 PM   #17
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I'm considering the i9900 as my next printer. I need something that can print fantastic photos, which this printer does with no problems. We also print text documents... but I haven't found any specs on B&W printing.

It's not relevant to photo printing, but do you have any idea of the B&W textoutput speed of the i9900?

Or, maybe I should ask this: Will the i9900 fulfill both photo and general-duty printing?For example, does it have high-quality text and, say, non-photo-quality color for printing things such as maps from MapQuest? It seems like a dumb question to me, but every review, along with Canon's specs only describe the photo print features -- although I do realize that photo printing is the whole idea behind this printer. If the i9900 is not really a general-purpose machine, then I always have a backup HP 960C for text.

Also, does Canon indicate anything about printlongevity (ink light resistance)? I couldn't find any info about this aspect, either. For example, the Epson R800 advertises up to 80 years or even a theoretical 100-year longevity in accelerated test conditions. I would assume Canon's inksmay have a similar feature.

Thanks for your help.

EDIT: I've been searching through the forums here and it seems as though the type of paper you use has a lot to do with print longevity. IIRC, someone mentioned Kodak long-life paper...

EDIT#2: I read Steve's page with the press release of the i9900prior to my original post, but I guess I didn't read close enough. :-)

http://www.steves-digicams.com/pr/ca..._i9900_pr.html

From the press release:
Quote:
Photo printing speeds on the i9900 printer remain significantly faster than the competition. Users can print a 4 x 6-inch borderless photo in about 38 seconds, a 5 x 7-inch borderless photo in approximately 47 seconds, an 8.5 x 11-inch borderless photo in about 84 seconds and a full 13 x 19-inch borderless photograph in under three minutes***. For printing text, websites and other documents, the i9900 model features print speeds of up to 16 pages per minute (ppm) in black and up to 12 ppm in color printing***.
Now I guess that answers most of my questions. Just need more info on print longevity.





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Old Aug 31, 2004, 9:11 PM   #18
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Max Rebo wrote:
Quote:
Just need more info on print longevity.
AGREED! It seems like Canon is hiding something that they don't want to talk about.
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Old Sep 2, 2004, 1:52 AM   #19
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BLueSS wrote:
Quote:
Max Rebo wrote:
Quote:
Just need more info on print longevity.
AGREED! It seems like Canon is hiding something that they don't want to talk about.
Quit trolling... Two clicks from their web page on any printer is a bunch of details.


http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/con...39&id=6166

By combining these inks with our Photo Paper Pro, users are guaranteed of photo-quality output that retains light-fastness for more than 25 years, without fading.

----------------------------------------------

Want longer life ?? Use the Kodak Ultima paper that has a rated life of 100+ years with Canon printers.

The longest lasting inkjet photo paper in the vast majority of cases under typical home display conditions. Lasts over 100 years when using latest inks without protection behind glass.

----------------------------------

I have seen reports that Canon has "Century Paper" in Japan that they are test marketing.


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Old Sep 3, 2004, 10:08 PM   #20
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Quote:
CastleDude wrote:
Want longer life ?? Use the Kodak Ultima paper that has a rated life of 100+ years with Canon printers.
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...98&forum_id=40
Quick search shows that Canon Printers print with a nasty pooling effect on Kodak papers, :sad: leaving the Canon photos' lifespan back to 25 years for good pictures.
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