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Old Sep 30, 2005, 11:16 AM   #111
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Hey guys, take a chill pill and keep the stuff ON TOPIC here please.

The forums are to exchange helpful ideas and tips and the like between friendly folks, so shake hands and set an example for others - kids read these forums too
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Old Nov 1, 2005, 1:58 PM   #112
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I am shopping for a printer for fine art reproductions. I have been researching the Epson 1800/2200, the HP 8750 and the Canon i9900. My main objective is archival quality.

However, I do lean towards the HP because I have never enjoyed a good relationship with any Epson printer, whereas HP has always been reliable for me.

After reading all the postings I have almost decided but I still have a couple of questions.

PAPER: I need to use aHEAVY GUAGE MATTE- currently I am using a 44 lb. My preferred size is 12" X 16". I see you say that the HP is limited to 2 papers - which are they?Is there a matte heavy that comes in a 12" X 16"?

INK:Are the Viveras as good as the Epson's? And this issue of ink droplet size - does that fact that the Epson's are smaller make a visual difference as far as anyone can tell? Or has anyone been able to compare the output of the two printers?

Dalton
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Old Nov 2, 2005, 8:10 AM   #113
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Dalton, I like yourself, did extensive research before purchasingthe HP 8750. I use it for my fine art photo work and I've been very happy with the results. I was recently in a gallery show and all of my prints came from this printer. I got repeated comments about how rich andvibrant the colors were. People were very impressed with the color outputfrom this printer. The black and white prints looked great as well.

I use HP's Satin finsh paper which is 76 lb as stated on the box. It's also called soft gloss but it's closer to a matte in my opinion. The texture and feel of this paper is very substancial. It's not flimsy.

As far as longevity is concerned, Wilhelm Imaging Research rates HP's fade resistance on premium plus paper using Vivera ink at approx. 108 years, longer for black and white. I would call that archival.

I don't know how this printers output compares to Epson since I don't ownthe Epson but I would say thatboth arestate of the art printers. I don't think any of these top end printers would dissapoint you. Epson has more paper choices availabel but since I'm happy with HP'ssatin finsh this is not an issue. For methere werea number of considerations that led me to go with HP i.e. it does not waste ink to clean the heads at every startup (that is a lot of wasted ink) it does not clog heads and I like the fact that you get a new head with each cartridge.Good luck.

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Old Nov 2, 2005, 9:02 PM   #114
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Taken from Epson's Brochures...

Premium Glossy Photo Paper 85 years color, > 135 years BW
Premium Luster Photo Paper 71 years color, > 95 years BW
Premium Semimatte Paper 67 years color, > 76 years BW
Ultrasmooth Fine Art paper 108 years color > 205 years BW
Somerset Velvet for Epson 62 years color > 90 years BW
Somerset Premier Art /Prem Art Spray 166 years color > 312 years BW
Epson Velvet Fine Art Paper 61 years color > 115 years BW
Epson Velvet Fine Art with Prem Art Spray 82 years color, >178 years BW
Enhanced Matte Paper 76 years color, > 110 years BW
Premier Are Water Canvas 75 years color, >150 years BW...

If the prints only last one half of the ratings I would be happy!!

Epson is the 'artsy' printer of choice, it doesnt take away from the HP.

I own a 4800 Pro Stylus, and r1800 and have access to a HP8750.

The Epson with the new K3 Ultrachrome inks and the 3 blacks are very, very good on the widest variety of papers.

Also the prnter drivers are more versatile than Canon or HP. Prints up to 129" long, wheras the Canon and HP are limited to approx 24 inches.

If you really want an HP printer look at the Designjets, they will allow for longer prints. If you want to stay at the A3 13 x 19 size printer the Epson R2400 would be the printer to look at , the R1800 will not handle the really think fine are papers..and canvas stock. The R2400 will easily. The R1800 has only 2 black inks the R2400 has 3 and a photp black and a matte black in that are changed out depending on what your printing on...glossy, semi-gloss or luster vx the fiberous cotton fine art papers.

Note: You will also find lots of 3rd party fine art paper profiles for Epson and the cloggin issues common with earlier generations of pigment printers is a thing of history, not speaking from hearsay, but from what I own, use and experience...

All the Best

Alex















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Old Nov 3, 2005, 12:28 AM   #115
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I read in some reviews of the Epson R1800 that any problems with the print heads meant the printer had to be shipped out to a service centre. There was no other choice. That is costly and time consuming especially given where I live in the middle of nowhere. With Canon I could get the new ones sent to me. And the hP does not have the problem.

Certainly I am very impressed with the widevariety of paper that the Epson takes, unlike the HP. I would like to produce a number of different types of consumer art on a variety of surfaces.

But thepotential issues with servicing scares me. I have hadother Epsons and swore I never would again. They were lower end printers but they wasted so much ink and let me down so often. I don't want to get saddled with a lemon. The HP would be less versatile and exciting but it would be a safe bet. And for the money I am not prepared to take a gamble.

Have you had any clogs at all yet? How long have you had the printer and how much use does it get? Have you had any problems at all?

Does it have to be used every week just to keep it from clogging? What happens if you go away for a few weeks? Is there any way to take out the print heads and soak them or something?

How much do you estimate it costs in INK and PAPER to print one full colour page (8.5 X 11)?

As far as the 2400 is concerned - that is a lot of money. Do you believe that the 2400 is substantially better than the R1800 you have now? Do you think it is worth the extra money for reasons other than the broad variety of paper that it takes. Have youtried a 2400 and is the output better than the 1800?

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Old Nov 3, 2005, 2:28 PM   #116
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Dalton,

I have had my R1800 since April, I print our at least two times a week on an average. It has sat there once for t weeks unattended. I have not had any issue with this printer. It has performed flawlessly. These are not you 'farhers' pigment ink printers.

I honestly don not anticipate a printhead problem (knockon wood)....and yes your right that with some Canons youca replace the head....is not cheap and often its cheaper to replace the whol dang printer. And yes for HP with the built in printhead.

Yes the wide variety papers that you can use with Epsons and the longvity and versatlity of the printer dirve...these far outweigh sitting up a night worrying if your printhead will need replacing. If your worrying about leaving your printer powered off for a few weeks whats the difffernce it waiting a week or so to get it fixed. Just make sure your printheasd breaks when you dont want to use it :-).

If this scares you, then your loosing out onbeing able to do lots of neat printing.Absollutely NO clogs. It just prodcues great prints.

I dont go out of my way to use it every week to keep it from clogging, it just doesnt clog. I am sure the printhead can come out, Ijust never have had to go there.

Cost of paper is all over the place, depends on the type and quantity you would buy. Go to www.atlex.com and they have costs listed there by sq ft. for sheets and rolls.

Cost of ink is about $11 US per 13 ml cartridge. The ink costs are no more than the Canon i950 or i9950 i ues. Relatively expensive, but it the price you pay for home printing. Instant gratifcation.

The 2400 is not substantially better. It has the three black/grey inks like HP has had for sometime now. The R1800 has only 2 black inks. If your really worried about the cost the R1800 will do just fine. The R1800 will also allow for a broad variety ofpapers, its just limited by the thickness of these papers, you will have to use the thinner stock when it comes to fine art papers. Another issue would be the depth of the blacks on fine art or rag/cotten papers.

I printed out 8 5 x 7 prints the other night on both the R1800 and the 4800 Pro Stylus (uses the same inks that the 2400 does) and they are very close in output. I really do not think you would notice the difference. There are differences, but these can be dealt with if you dont think the output to is to your liking, but lots of R1800 owners are elated with defualt setting and default profiles provided for all those papers.

The R1800 on glossy and semi-gloss and luster are magnificent.

You will be able to print 13" by 129" long panoramics if you desire, cant even think of doing this on an HP 8750. or a Canon in this price range...

All the Best!

Alex






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Old Dec 1, 2005, 1:32 AM   #117
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Olympus has made one for several years now, the P440. They have a P400 also but it isn't a true 8x10. (More like 7.8x10)?? The print quality is very good but I have read a few disgrunted owners complaining about their printers having problems after a few months! They sell for around 350-400 and the cost/ 8x10, buying paper and ribbons from 3rd party suppliers, is about $1.65. HiTouch (HiTi) also makes several models of dye-sub prinders which do an excellent job. I own a 4x6 printer and the cost is about .39/print. They may well have gotten into the 8x10 and larger size printers by now also.
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Old Dec 1, 2005, 2:00 AM   #118
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adydula wrote:
Quote:
The R1800 will also allow for a broad variety ofpapers, its just limited by the thickness of these papers, you will have to use the thinner stock when it comes to fine art papers. Another issue would be the depth of the blacks on fine art or rag/cotten papers.

Adydula............Do you know offhand what the thickness limitations are on the 1800?



Thanks
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Old Dec 1, 2005, 10:10 PM   #119
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Hello:

There is a review at: http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/int...00/page_10.htm

This is the last paragaph on this page of the review:

[align=justify]"I have had a couple of emails from readers asking if the R1800 will handle canvas media, the answer is in short NO . EPSON UK has confirmed that this printer has no facility to handle canvas media. The R1800 handles media weights from 64 gm up to 251 gm ".[/align]
[align=justify]To be fair I have used some 'thin' canvas with my R1800, it took a little ingenuity to get it to feed and when it did it did a marvelous job.[/align]
[align=justify]All the best[/align]
[align=justify]Alex[/align]
[align=justify][/align]
[align=justify][/align]
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Old Dec 14, 2005, 10:20 PM   #120
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Seems I remember being in love with my Epson 1270 for about 2 years. And then the clogs started. Even after having it serviced twice for half of what it costs and keeping it covered. It clogs, it smears,it bands,no matter how many times a week I use it, I have to do something to keep it working. With cleaning cycles using lots of ink. I'm sure Epson likes selling ink cartridges

I understand it's construction and function, but why doesn't Epson not offer some flushing cartridges,like after market sources have for sale,perhaps the $$ they make one waste using the ink cartridges themselvesto clean the heads. Their techs won't even tell you anything thats not in the owners manual. I had to learn most of the cleaning techniques from the service center 125 miles from where I live, or online trouble shooters.

This has so negatively colored my opinion of any Epson product, I'm watchingthe progress of these arguments with great interest, to see if or when the R1800 problems start to show up. I'm pretty sure it's not the inks, but the paper lint residues, cat hair, dead skin and other contaminates etc. that get into the non removable printheads that start the problem.
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