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Old Jun 7, 2005, 2:21 AM   #31
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Thanks for this explanation - most helpful. It would be even more helpful if the manufacturers stated more clearly on their packaging which type of paper was inside the box!

I do have a WARNING. In spite of raving about the HP 8750 used with Ilford Classic Pearl paper, we have now realized it is still not completely dry, even 10 days after printing. This is unusual as a previous posting stated it was a "swellable" paper. One would expect it to work therefore???? Are there different types of swellable paper, just to confuse us?

Please do not use this combination of printer/paper. I have since used the HP semi-matt surface premium paper and it looks virtually identical to the Ilford. We have only just used it so I am assuming that it will dry! However, it is really hard to find in France, in anything larger than A4.

We continue to be delighted with the results of the HP 8750. A superb inkjet printer.
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 11:47 AM   #32
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That's very good to know. I was consideringgetting someIlford paper. I've printed approximately 57, 8x11 and about 8, 13x19 on HP premium plus paper and HP premium paper. I couldn't be happier with the output of this printer. Your right, it's superb.

I guess I'll continue using HP paper. I like the results and I have not had any drying issues using it. My prints are primarily art work for sale so paper cost is lessof an issue forme.

I prefer the HP satin finish. One problem I have found is that HP, so far, does not have an 11x17 satin paper although it's availabe in the preferred 13x19. I hope I'm assuming correctly that this will change in the future. I can't believe they won't be more competitive with their paper choices. The 8750 proves they are deadly serious about this market segment.

tony
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 4:18 PM   #33
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Good info on the Ilford. I was going to try it, but now I won't. Especially since you say you got similar/same results with the HP. As for drying on the Ilford, it could have something to do with the formulation of the coating used on their proprietary pearl type surface. It may not fully encapsulate the inks, at least not as efficiently as HP's own. Just guessing though. You could also try spraying what you already have with some Krylon Preserve It. I generally do that anyway for all my sale prints.

Tony, your problem is solvable in the short term by using the larger 13x19 and print/cut to size. You'd only be giving up the extra 2" of paper and in cost for your type sales (similar to mine), it wouldn't make that much difference. But I agree with you and hope that HP will make better use of this printer (and its successors) by coming out with a few more media choices. AND BIGGER INK CARTS!!!!

Ray
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Old Jun 7, 2005, 6:31 PM   #34
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Hi everyone,

I was wondering, has anyone noticed a print output difference between the Best and Maximum dpi print quality modes? I've printed up to 11x14 using 11x17 paper and so far haven't seen a difference between the two even though I've had the printer only for a day.
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Old Jun 9, 2005, 2:53 PM   #35
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Good idea Ray, i.e. cutting 13x19,thanks for the suggestion. I don't see how HP can come up with a bigger ink cart for the 8750 because of the fixed space limitation. Anew printer designed for a larger cart is more of a possibility. That doesn't help us though.

If they don't come up with more paper choices I would be very surprised and disappointed. I don't think a company like HP would let themselves be outperformed in this area. They are starting from behind but they really are one of the 800 pound gorillas. I hope they don't drop the ball. In the meantime I'm very happy with the soft satin finish for art work, it looks great.

tony
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Old Jun 12, 2005, 1:28 AM   #36
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Actually there is room for a larger tri-colour and photo blue cartridge. Only the monochrome 102 (not 100) catrridge is at about physical limit for the carriage. Interestingly, ink consumption shows that despite the 102 being larger, it goes down the same rate as the others even with a bias towards colour rather than B&W printing.

Jonathan


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Old Aug 3, 2005, 4:29 PM   #37
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Keith said:

Ihave digested alot of facts (hopefully) on different printers and I have decided on the HP 90 30/130 designjet and the Canon i9900 and now the HP 8750 so I need advice from people who print with these printers and what papers they use.

I print a 11x17 quarterly phylosophical news letter with approximately 50% picture on the HP1700d.

I am impressed with the information on the HP 8750, you people are giving, I checked into this printer but I was led to believe it was not for true photo printing. I am hearing from you people that it is.

I thank you for any help you can give me.

My date of purchase will probably be no sooner than a month, I want to give myself more time to reinvestigate the HP 8750.

Keith
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Old Aug 3, 2005, 7:51 PM   #38
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I've found that there are fewer available papers for HP, and I think they don't have a very good line, especially for photo and fine are printing. I'm continually miffed at them for this -- bad and irresponsible marketing and support.

I've been looking for a true matte or fine art paper to use with my HP 7960. I tried and liked Moab papers, but Moab told me that they don't make swellable coated papers, so you can't really get much longevity with their papers (kudos for their honesty and support however!).

And since the red river paper claims to be good for both dye and pigment based inks, I'm immediately suspicious -- I understand that because of the coatings, it should be one or the other.

I'm not saying you can't get great prints with a whole range of papers, only I question how they will hold up in 5, 10, 15 years.

David.
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Old Aug 3, 2005, 9:04 PM   #39
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Keith

The 8750 is aPHOTO printer. That's what it's designed for! I've been using it for months and it delivers superb photo prints. I'm doing an art gallery show in October and every printI'mexibitingisfrom the 8750.

This is a state of the art printer. If you forget about all the peripheral considerations andthink in terms of image qualitythere isn't a enough differance between the top of the line printers to even think about.

If you want to get into ink cartridge configurations, paper choices, cost per print, go for it, but this printer delivers what it promises! Everything else is debatable but not the image quality. I print my art work on the HPsatin finish paper and it looks great. Yes, more choices would be just dandy, but I have not found this to be a problem since I've been so happy with the the satin paper.

It's tough trying to make a decision based on what you read on these forums because no matter what, there is always the demon of subjectivity and bias. I've read and heardso many opinionspro and con for so many differant printers it makes my head spin. I can telll you this one thing: I amusing this printer and it delivers.

tony
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Old Aug 6, 2005, 11:31 PM   #40
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Keith

The 8750 is truly a great Photo printer for several reasons. I would say it's two great key points are: 1/ The quality of its B&W output and 2/ The fact that the print heads are incorporated into the ink cartridge assembly which means that you are replacing the head every time you replace a cartridge. This second point eliminates all kinds of headaches we've had with other printers that need the print heads cleaning from time to time or even total replacement; an expensive job that can only be done by a qualified engineer.

A third advantage is that the 8750 is incredibly simple to use and is my favourite for fast, amazing prints.

The real downside to this printer is its limited choice of papers. I have tried it with Ilford's swellable and non-swellable papers and the inks will not dry on either of them. There is something else going on with this printer that I don't understand which means their ink only dries on their own paper. (Of course I have not tested every paper on the market). So don't assume that any swellable paper will work.
We use the HP Premium Plus Photo Papers, only available in gloss or semi-matt finish and in limited size variations. If you are happy with this limitation, get the 8750. If you'd like a wider choice of paper for your printer, this is not the one to buy.
The only way to get such great B&W prints from other printers is to replace the manufacturer's carts with some of the "All grey/black" inksets made by companies such as Lyson and Permajet. But then you can't use 'em for color at the same time......

Good luck with your decision.
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