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Old Aug 8, 2003, 4:20 PM   #11
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jazcan

Adobe had some good discounts for students. The full price of PS (not LE) is really high, but the amount of the student discount is so large (at times) that it can be worth taking a class at a local community college just to get the discount. Maybe there is a discount on Elements as well?)

Something to think about. I was lucky that the Canon 10D came with PS Elements. Just what I needed.

Under Elements, there is a "Mode" under "Image", but I don't see a way to change to sRGB. There is a "color Table" option which is grey'ed out, maybe that would do it (with the right mojo.)

Kevin G
There are some subtle differences in the background, along with on some parts of the bird. I like it.

I learned about the color space stuff in a forum on... dpreview? or maybe robgalbraith? Ya, in this area I think:
http://www.robgalbraith.com/ubbthrea...at=&Board=UBB3

I didn't understand a lot of it, but I clearly I learned something.

Eric
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Old Aug 8, 2003, 10:04 PM   #12
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Maybe it is a function of the clarity of our monitors, because I noted little difference in the shots. Janet
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Old Aug 9, 2003, 4:55 AM   #13
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Hi Janet, has your monitor been neutralized and color calibrated? A calibrated system is a must for evaluating prints. The second shot exhibits a much "warmer" look to it. this was taken in late afternoon, the quality of the light was very golden and buttery. Is seems to be much more apparent in the second shot, remember, there were NO other adjustments made to the second shot other than the colorspace conversion.

Hi Eric the colorspace thing has many levels to it, IMHO the root of it is that the various colorspaces all have varying amounts of color comdinations that they can produce, the wider the range of color (gamut) usually, the better. Also remember that no printer has as wide a color gamut as our monitors! Here's a link to a good article by Bruce Fraser http://www.creativepro.com/story/feature/10150.html
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Old Aug 9, 2003, 10:37 AM   #14
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One time I saw the color cube which matched sRGB and Adobe RGB. And I wondered why anyone used sRGB. Wish I still had the link, I'd post it here. It was a great example of the differences between what those two color spaces could represent.

But I learned that sRGB has basically become a standard for the web (unless all your viewers are on the Mac, which has browsers which seems to handled all this better.)

Thanks for that article. It looks like a good read.

Eric
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