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Old Aug 15, 2007, 12:06 AM   #1
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I'm looking into getting a monopod for my camera set up. This weekend I was out at the beach shooting some friends surfing. The camera and lens gets heavy hand holding it after awhile. Any suggestions or things to look for in a monopod? Wasn't sure where to post this question so I thought I'd give you guys a try first.

And here's a recent pic just to make this post legit. :G
While waiting for the next set of waves to come it, I grabbed this shot. I think it's an immature snowy plover. Cute little fellah.



Thanks.

- Hung
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Old Aug 15, 2007, 12:39 AM   #2
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nice shot.I recently got a mono-pod. its a cheap light no name one (I think its name is Inca). Anyway, it had a pivoting and swivel head and also a stand at the bottom that comes out for you to put your foot on to stop the bottom sliding out. It did not agree with me. i found the swivel head a pain and I got my hubby to modify the pod so that it screws straight into the bottom of the camera, I also took the foot off. since then I've loved using it when ever I have to stand around for long periods.
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Old Aug 15, 2007, 10:44 AM   #3
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The downside of a monopod that screws into the camera bottom is that there is no quick and easy way to remove the camera for catchingquick fly-bys; even a quick release head is an encumberance. What I have found most useful is a shallow padded cradle that attaches to the monopod mounting screw and allows you to rest a long lens on it as you shoot,while allowing you to lift the camera instntly if needed. I have had one for years, but have not seen another one like it - there is no trade name on it so I have no idea who made it, but I suppose one could be fabricated. The monopod is a simple one, without a head. I used this setup when I took thepictures for Part I of the egret photoessay.

Snowy Plovers are resident and breed here in southern California small numbers; theyare on the endangered list. Nice shot.
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Old Aug 15, 2007, 11:59 AM   #4
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Here is a photo of the cradle. Width is 7". Depth without the padding is 2". The padding is a fabric coverfilled with small lightweight pellets and glued to the cradle frame. The strips are non-slip rubber.
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Old Aug 16, 2007, 1:13 AM   #5
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Mine is a Gitzo monopod with a Manfrotto ball head that has a single lock for stopping the ball from pivoting and the head from horizontal swirling. The device for fixing the camera to the ball is the fast-removal plate.

I like using the above setting with lenses that have tripod collars. The ballwill be bended to the side, so the camera and the lenses will be hanging from the tripod perpendicularly. I will loosen the screw of the tripod collars so that the lens and the camera can be rotated to the planethatI want.

Since the ball is bended to the side, it fixes there, and so, there is not any risk of sudden droppingthat may happen when the ball is in the vertical position and not properly locked. When moving around with the whole set, what you have to do to fix all the set up from moving is tofasten the screw on the tripod collar and lock the ball head.

The only possibility that the camera and lens will fall off is when the fast removal plate is not properly locked. Perhaps, another possibility is that the camera comes out from the screw of the fast removal plate.

I recommend using the one-lock ball head because with two, one of the locks may probably obstructed the camera, especially when you are using the vertical handgrip, as it pivotes around the ball head. Also, when the flash is used, the lock will hit on the flash and damges it.
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Old Aug 16, 2007, 1:24 AM   #6
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The plover: crispy sharp, clean,cute and brilliant colours.
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Old Aug 16, 2007, 8:47 AM   #7
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I have a simple monopod, but don't use it. When I did use it, I didn't extend it but braced it against my body anchoring it usually using my belt as a base. I see there are special belts for this type of useage. I found it difficult to keep from moving even using the pod. I find I can hand hold about the same as with or without. I've been trying my tripod lately using a pistol grip. It works surprisingly well for quick changes. I haven't tried any of the high end heads that are out there, but may investigate in the short future as winter is coming, and it gets so dark up here...cheers...Don
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