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Old Aug 26, 2007, 4:01 PM   #1
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I have been trying for a while to get a Kingfisher going in the water after a fish and got this one finally. The water errupting from the dive partially obscured the action but can see the small fish in her bill in the reflection. Taken in early morning lightalong the Sabine River in Tx.


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Old Aug 26, 2007, 4:05 PM   #2
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This Red-tailed Hawk and I frequent the same area. It lifted off from it's perch and made a flyby at low altitude.


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Old Aug 26, 2007, 6:55 PM   #3
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Good catch with the Kingfisher - your aim and hers were right on.

I don't understand the light in the Red-tail's eye - diurnal birds don't have a tapetum (reflective layer) in the back of the eye to produce eyeshine. What was theposition of the sun when the picture was taken? Did you attempt to put in a highlight in pp? It looks like the pupil is wide open with the spot right in the middle - I wonder if it could have a cataract in that eye?

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Old Aug 26, 2007, 8:15 PM   #4
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Thanks for the comment, penolta. The glintwas for you :-)very observant!This hawk was quartering to the sun. Can you elaborate a bit on the shine in/on the eyes of diurnal birds?

I may be confused as to what you meant as I see that pretty often. Thanks.
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Old Aug 26, 2007, 9:55 PM   #5
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Quote:
Can you elaborate a bit on the shine in/on the eyes of diurnal birds?
There should be none. This might be a reflection of glare within the lens itself. Mammals with eyes adapted for dark vision have a layer of reflective substances (the tapetum - often crystals ofthe amino acicd argenine) behind the retina that intensify the light reaching the photosensitive cells in the retina - this is the eyeshine you see in the eyes of your dog or cat or in a deer when it is looking into a light source like headlights at night (the retinal cells point backwards and receive light reflected from the back of the eye passing through the retina and back out of the eye). Birds do not have this layer, and hence do not have eyeshine (although some nocturnal birds do have eyes that seem to show reflected light of various colors). The "red eye" that humans (and other diurnal primates) show is only the color of the haemoglobin in the blood vessels on the back of the eye as light passes through the retina and reflects back.
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Old Aug 26, 2007, 10:19 PM   #6
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Two very good shots. Thanks for sharing. What can I say about the info. I love learning things. Thanks for that penolta.
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Old Aug 26, 2007, 10:30 PM   #7
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I can understand what you are saying about the difference in how light is reflected between diurnal and nocturnal creatures.

What are we seeing though,when a diurnal bird has the head turned towards the sun/light source and has what we all try to get...a catch light? That is not supposed to be there? I have been looking at some of my shots that have that and in the center of the eye and some not so center. This is interesting. I appreciate the feedback.



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Old Aug 26, 2007, 10:34 PM   #8
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Bynx...thanks for the comments.

Those of us wayless knowledgable in Ornithology than penolta can learn something here.
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Old Aug 27, 2007, 12:31 PM   #9
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Sabine wrote:
Quote:
I can understand what you are saying about the difference in how light is reflected between diurnal and nocturnal creatures.

What are we seeing though,when a diurnal bird has the head turned towards the sun/light source and has what we all try to get...a catch light? That is not supposed to be there? I have been looking at some of my shots that have that and in the center of the eye and some not so center. This is interesting. I appreciate the feedback.



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We all striveto geta catch light in the eye as it looks lifeless without it, butthis just didn't look like a catch light to me - itseems too intense, toolarge, toosymmetrical and too perfectly centered - if it is, it is a rare combination of circumstances. It just didn't look right to me, hence the conjecture about reflection within the eye lens. (this by way of explanation, and not arguement) Still,the shotmakesa good image.

Another point is that the eye looks like it is in shadow as it should be - hawks have a bony shelf that projects over the eye (which gives them that fierce frowning expression) to protect against the sun from above) which should prevent this sort of thing. One should never say never, but I have been looking at birds for a lifetime amd photographing them for more than half that, andcannot recall seeinganything exactly like that, either myself or in a photograph -- which is why I both noticed it and brought up the question. If you have any photos exactly like that, I'd like to see a couple for my own elucidation.
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Old Aug 27, 2007, 8:16 PM   #10
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Some good information, penolta. The more I can learn about the subject, the better for me.

Here is another Red-tail with a shine/glint/catchlight. I have looked at some of mine and it is hard for me to detect the position of the pupil in relation to the light in the eye...unless I crop it way in, and naturally detail is lost.

I have a photo of another Red-tail that you might be interested in looking at. It may have a cataract or damaged eye. Will put it in a different thread.


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