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Old Dec 22, 2007, 9:52 PM   #1
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Mark 3 Wild Turkey Portraits

1st try with my NEW Mark 3

I set up the Mark 3 at the best quality, largest JPEG's, AL Servo Af, and continuous shooting. Everything else is on the cameras default. I guess this makes it a expensive Point & Shoot camera.

I used my new 500 mm lens

Very overcast with on an off snow showers. About 10 degrees

Any ideas or etc. is appreciated. Also critics more than welcome, that is how I learn.









A couple of other little guys showed up while I was hiding in a bush.









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Old Dec 22, 2007, 10:09 PM   #2
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Hi Roger, congratulations on the Mark III. Clearly the camera seems to be focusing well in Al Servo, and you seem to have a good sharp lens to boot, one great start with the camera. Metering with this camera is simply a matter of practice and subject matter. I am posting an example of how this camera draws out the details, even in low light and even when underexposed in the feather area of this bird. I was actually a touch surprised at how much detail I got out of this one shot simply by downloading it and boosting gamma a touch.

Clearly your camera is working fine in the area of focus and it will simply be a learning experience when it comes to metering. I find that "evaluative" metering in AP works excellent with the camera, whereas with the Mark II I rarely used evaluative. The camera, in my experience, seems to be able to "evaluate" more accurately and there's something beautiful in the internal guts of this camera that makes it able to pick up detail in JPG mode that I have never before experienced. I can especially see this in shooting chickadees where the "cheeks" of the little bird were almost always next to impossible to show detail, even when shooting RAW. With the Mark III I have had amazing success in picking up cheek detail as well as detail in the dark "cap" areas using the same metering, and as I have indicated above, it is "evaluative" metering where the camera just seems to be able to compute a very good compromise to both light and dark areas.

Hope that helps, and congrats on the purchase!


A slight touch of gamma and a bit of color saturation in post. My in camera settings for basic shooting are as follows:
Sharpness - maximum
Contrast - one above center
Saturation - one above center
Color tone - left smack in the middle


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Old Dec 22, 2007, 10:17 PM   #3
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Normcar wrote:
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Hi Roger, congratulations on the Mark III. Clearly the camera seems to be focusing well in Al Servo, and you seem to have a good sharp lens to boot, one great start with the camera. Metering with this camera is simply a matter of practice and subject matter. I am posting an example of how this camera draws out the details, even in low light and even when underexposed in the feather area of this bird. I was actually a touch surprised at how much detail I got out of this one shot simply by downloading it and boosting gamma a touch.

Clearly your camera is working fine in the area of focus and it will simply be a learning experience when it comes to metering. I find that "evaluative" metering in AP works excellent with the camera, whereas with the Mark II I rarely used evaluative. The camera, in my experience, seems to be able to "evaluate" more accurately and there's something beautiful in the internal guts of this camera that makes it able to pick up detail in JPG mode that I have never before experienced. I can especially see this in shooting chickadees where the "cheeks" of the little bird were almost always next to impossible to show detail, even when shooting RAW. With the Mark III I have had amazing success in picking up cheek detail as well as detail in the dark "cap" areas using the same metering, and as I have indicated above, it is "evaluative" metering where the camera just seems to be able to compute a very good compromise to both light and dark areas.

Hope that helps, and congrats on the purchase!


A slight touch of gamma and a bit of color saturation in post. My in camera settings for basic shooting are as follows:
Sharpness - maximum
Contrast - one above center
Saturation - one above center
Color tone - left smack in the middle

Thank you SIR.

I just printed your information and I am going to try and set mine the same way. Tomorrow I will try it since I have hunters in town this week and I am on long days again.

Thanks again


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Old Dec 22, 2007, 10:27 PM   #4
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Roger, looks like you're off to a great start with the new set up. It's also a great plus to receive tips froma great shooter with the same camera. One of the benefits of life at the forum.
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Old Dec 22, 2007, 10:30 PM   #5
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One thing to possibly consider, Roger, when using evaluative metering in snow. It works for chickadees because the focus point is so tiny between the cheek and the black cap that it tends to work well.

However, with the wild turkeys, which are larger and dark in color, you might have some luck using spot metering, depending on how close, though. That first shot is 50% dark and 50% light so you will never get an extremely good metering balance, I'd say. You might be better of using your exposure bracketing feature and combining the best exposure of darks and the best exposure of lights. I'm too lazy for that sort of thing, though, so I have never actually done that with the Mark III because I've found that there is enough retention of detail in the dark areas, even if a touch noisy if extremely underexposed.

All of the above simply means that you need to work out the fine points according to your own tastes and your own style of shooting. Have fun! Cheers
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Old Dec 22, 2007, 10:55 PM   #6
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great start with the new camera, wish i could get one. Which 500 lens did you get?
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Old Dec 22, 2007, 11:15 PM   #7
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A big congratulations to you. Now I have even more reason to look forward to your posts. You are going to have a ball I'm sure and you are off to a great start.

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Old Dec 23, 2007, 5:24 AM   #8
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Those shots of the buzzard look like my second wife. I woke up one day after drinking the night before and there she was. I thought (wished) I was dead. Took me 3 years to fix the situation. Thanks for the reminder.
By the way, I have a wild rabbit which looks a lot like your shot sitting beside me as it usually does. Its name is Stewie Gilligan Mitchell. My kids idea.
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Old Dec 23, 2007, 12:29 PM   #9
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bmullen@comcast wrote:
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Roger, looks like you're off to a great start with the new set up. It's also a great plus to receive tips froma great shooter with the same camera. One of the benefits of life at the forum.
NORMCAR, helping me out is going to save me many, many hours of confusion. A big THANK you to him.

I think this is going to be fun to learn.



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Old Dec 23, 2007, 12:31 PM   #10
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Normcar wrote:
Quote:
One thing to possibly consider, Roger, when using evaluative metering in snow. It works for chickadees because the focus point is so tiny between the cheek and the black cap that it tends to work well.

However, with the wild turkeys, which are larger and dark in color, you might have some luck using spot metering, depending on how close, though. That first shot is 50% dark and 50% light so you will never get an extremely good metering balance, I'd say. You might be better of using your exposure bracketing feature and combining the best exposure of darks and the best exposure of lights. I'm too lazy for that sort of thing, though, so I have never actually done that with the Mark III because I've found that there is enough retention of detail in the dark areas, even if a touch noisy if extremely underexposed.

All of the above simply means that you need to work out the fine points according to your own tastes and your own style of shooting. Have fun! Cheers
More hints printed thanks to Normcar.

Next week when I am done with scouting I am anxious to go out and give some of these ideas a try.


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