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Old Jan 14, 2008, 2:54 PM   #1
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Eagle ISO??? Help Please

I am a NEWBIE when it comes to changing settings on a camera. What I have been trying and it seems to work is in low light raise the ISO thingie. I normally leave the camera on 400 ISO cuz that is what was suggested to me.

Mid-Day very bright sun

I figured it was so bright I better try making the ISO smaller than the normal 400. I reduced it to 200. Here is the EXIF information.

Camera Make: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS-1D Mark III
Image Date: 2008:01:13 20:31:21
Flash Used: No
Focal Length: 700.0mm
CCD Width: 28.12mm
Exposure Time: 0.0013 s (1/800)
Aperture: f/5.6
ISO equiv: 200
White Balance: Auto
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: shutter priority (semi-auto)

The top part of his head ??? # 1



left side of his head ??? Is this what you call blown out ??? #2



Front part of his neck ??? # 3

#4


#5
A different eagle in a different position to the sun. I like these a lot better.

#6


#7


#8


Any and all suggestions appreciated.


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Old Jan 14, 2008, 6:26 PM   #2
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Hi Roger. Yes, the side of it's head is what you'd call blown out. Great shots by the way....

I'm not a real techie who can explain it scientifically, but from a practical point, I would try to meter your light for the white head, and then adjust the dark areas in pp'ing (post processing). If you lower your ISO, you'll still have a fast shutter speed under such bright light, and hence, when you pp, you won't introduce much noise or very little in your shadows. Also, you can try to shoot in RAW- you'll have a much better chance of saving the blown out areas in your photo than you will shooting jpg. Blown highlights in jpg are almost irreversable whereas RAW can be saved by up to 1 stop or even a little more I think. Your blown out head on this shot might have been saved if you shot in RAW. Maybe you did shoot it in RAW - if so, you can back off the exposure and might have the detail still intact.

Another point that might help is to use your camera's histogram to check out your exposure level. If the white part of the histogram is all the way over to the right, you've blown out the shot. Ideally, the reading should be somewhere in the middle.

Hope I haven't confused the heck out of you. I bet others here on the forum can explain it a lot better than I can. Good luck.......cheers...Don
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Old Jan 14, 2008, 6:50 PM   #3
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thekman620 wrote:
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Hi Roger. Yes, the side of it's head is what you'd call blown out. Great shots by the way....

I'm not a real techie who can explain it scientifically, but from a practical point, I would try to meter your light for the white head, and then adjust the dark areas in pp'ing (post processing). If you lower your ISO, you'll still have a fast shutter speed under such bright light, and hence, when you pp, you won't introduce much noise or very little in your shadows. Also, you can try to shoot in RAW- you'll have a much better chance of saving the blown out areas in your photo than you will shooting jpg. Blown highlights in jpg are almost irreversable whereas RAW can be saved by up to 1 stop or even a little more I think. Your blown out head on this shot might have been saved if you shot in RAW. Maybe you did shoot it in RAW - if so, you can back off the exposure and might have the detail still intact.

Another point that might help is to use your camera's histogram to check out your exposure level. If the white part of the histogram is all the way over to the right, you've blown out the shot. Ideally, the reading should be somewhere in the middle.

Hope I haven't confused the heck out of you. I bet others here on the forum can explain it a lot better than I can. Good luck.......cheers...Don
I plan on trying to learn this RAW thing this year and it does sound like it will help me out. Thanks.
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Old Jan 14, 2008, 8:04 PM   #4
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good images roger. you said learning raw you can go to

http:http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/ :-) rick
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Old Jan 14, 2008, 8:19 PM   #5
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oakey wrote:
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good images roger. you said learning raw you can go to

http:http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/ :-) rick
Thanks oakey, I have bookmarked it.


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Old Jan 14, 2008, 8:41 PM   #6
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I'd be happy with any of those pictures.
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Old Jan 14, 2008, 9:15 PM   #7
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HOBO_sm wrote:
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I'd be happy with any of those pictures.
I am not unhappy but when I looked at them I thought they would be better if the white feathers on parts of his head were not blown out. I am just trying to learn.


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Old Jan 15, 2008, 9:57 AM   #8
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hi Roger,

yeah, the highlights are a tad blown, but this is a case where the dynamic range of the image - the difference in light intensity - between the bright spots and shadows is just a tad more than even the Mk III can compensate for. digital cameras, even top-end DSLRs, do not handle wide dynamic range as well as film, and neither compensatesas well as your eyes.you might try auto-bracketing in situations like this, set the EV for +/- 1 stop and let the camera snap off 3 frames, then pick the one you like best. bear in mind, +1 will give you more detail in the shadows, but more blown highlights, and -1 will get you the opposite. this is why they developed HDR processing. these images might be candidates for that...

changing the ISO won't change the metering, it will merely tell the camera to leave the shutter open for a different period of time based on the sensitivity of the sensor. any reason you were using shutter priority, vs aperture? out at 50 yards or more, DOF isn't really an issue even at f/5.6, but most lenses are sharper a stop or two down from wide open... setting your ISO back to 400 would give you a bit more speedto work with, which would allowmoreleeway in aperture, so you could get a bit more sharpness and still maintain a fast shutter speed...

frankly, under the bright, high-contrast conditions, these shots came out amazingly well. i'd be tickled silly to have that first one hanging on my wall! :G
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Old Jan 15, 2008, 11:12 AM   #9
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squirl033 wrote:
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hi Roger,

yeah, the highlights are a tad blown, but this is a case where the dynamic range of the image - the difference in light intensity - between the bright spots and shadows is just a tad more than even the Mk III can compensate for. digital cameras, even top-end DSLRs, do not handle wide dynamic range as well as film, and neither compensatesas well as your eyes.you might try auto-bracketing in situations like this, set the EV for +/- 1 stop and let the camera snap off 3 frames, then pick the one you like best. bear in mind, +1 will give you more detail in the shadows, but more blown highlights, and -1 will get you the opposite. this is why they developed HDR processing. these images might be candidates for that...

changing the ISO won't change the metering, it will merely tell the camera to leave the shutter open for a different period of time based on the sensitivity of the sensor. any reason you were using shutter priority, vs aperture? out at 50 yards or more, DOF isn't really an issue even at f/5.6, but most lenses are sharper a stop or two down from wide open... setting your ISO back to 400 would give you a bit more speedto work with, which would allowmoreleeway in aperture, so you could get a bit more sharpness and still maintain a fast shutter speed...

frankly, under the bright, high-contrast conditions, these shots came out amazingly well. i'd be tickled silly to have that first one hanging on my wall! :G
Thanks Rocky, maybe someday I will get all this camera stuff figured out.


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Old Jan 15, 2008, 11:46 AM   #10
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judging by the images you post here, Roger, you already have "all this camera stuff figured out"... at least most of it, anyway!
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