Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Wildlife Photos

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 29, 2008, 10:37 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
royce10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,869
Default

I woke up at 6am yesterday on Black Friday. I had a chance to go shopping and join the hordes of bargain shoppers elbowing each other or to spend the morning out a the local wildlife reserve.

No brainer. I grabbed my camera gear and headed out to Bolsa Chica for some peace and quiet.

1) Red Breasted Merganser.


2)



3)



4) During the downtime, these Eared Grebes kept us entertained with their fishing.



5)



6)



7)



8 ) A flock of Dowitchers zooming over the waters.



9) Surf Scoter. I watched this little guy dive for mussels and swallow one whole! I can't imagine how hard his poops must be...




1 0 ) Great Egret



11)



12) Snowy Egret



13) Brown Pelicans coming at ya!



14)



15)



16)




17)



1 8 )




19) Help me!



Thanks for looking and commenting.

- Hung

royce10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 29, 2008, 11:27 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 3,076
Default

Your pictures are remarkably good. I'm envious of your 'eye' and obvious skill.

What type of equipment, camera settings did you use ?
lesmore49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2008, 12:39 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
smac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Northern California
Posts: 6,103
Default

Great call in ditching the crowds and absolutely fantastic photos. I love them all but, that first shot of the Brown pelican coming at you is really striking.
Very cool shots Hung,
Steve
smac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2008, 5:14 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 349
Default

fantastic pics, as usual, hung. i particularly like the grebe pics. did that pelican think you had some fishies for him? he looked to be coming right atcha!

good day at the sanctuary, fer sure.

rained here.

ellen fl
ellenfl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2008, 7:10 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,817
Default

Awesome series, they are all so very beautiful.
flutelady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2008, 12:10 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
royce10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,869
Default

lesmore49 wrote:
Quote:
Your pictures are remarkably good. I'm envious of your 'eye' and obvious skill.

What type of equipment, camera settings did you use ?
Thanks Steve, Lesmore49, Ellen and Flutelady. I use a canon 20D and canon 400mm f5.6 lens. No I was not holding out a fish for the pelican. It was diving right at the base of the bridge. I was actually getting hit by the water splash when it dove, that's how close I was to it. The pelican would take off, circle around and come right at me and then dive.

In regards to camera settings: Apeture priorty usually wide open at F5.6; center point focus only, AI- servo, continuous shooting, auto white balance, ISO 200-400 and for some of these shots -1 EV.


- Hung
royce10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2008, 1:34 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Good shots as usual, Hung. Probably the same pelican I was photographing -we cam compare pictures (most of mine are in four threads in the Pentax forum) and see if it is the same bird. He is living dangerously diving between the pilings that way (I got splashed, too), but the shade of the bridge makes it easier to see the fish.

Good catch (for both you and the bird) of the grebe with the Silversides - looks almost too big for it to swallow - I usually see them with much smaller fish (pipefishes are their favorites in Bolsa Chica, and it is fun to see them wrapping themselves around the birds necks!). I also have a lot of grebe pictures (both eared and pied-billed, but I decided not to post them, because you can tell from the way their feathers are wet and sticking together that they are all oiled. Water flows into that portion of the refuge from two sources - a drainage canal and Huntington Harbour Marina; when it rains, oil from the streets runs into the canal, and oil from boat motors in the Marina floats in, too, so there is (or was a couple of weeks ago) a light film of oil on the water (you can't always see it, but you can tell by how long bubbles persist on the surface). Grebes are particularly vulnerable because they repeatedly dive and surface through the film - they do not fly readily and tend to stay in the same areas for a long time, and when they try to clean their feathers, they swallow the oil along with the feathers they must ingest. Grebes are unique in that they lack a sphincter muscle at the end on their stomachs, and swallow feathers to filter out fish bones, which they then cough up wrapped in the feathers as pellets. So they suffer both from hypothermia and oil toxicity, and are the most severely affected by oil spills which take a heavy toll on them. In the infamous Santa Barbara oil spill, the Western Grebes were decimated because they were massing for migration in huge numbers at the time, and their carcasses washed up on beaches all along the coast; their numbers have never been the same locally, and the American Trader spill off Huntington Beach also accounted for many more of them.

You wondered about the Scoter swallowing mollusc shells - the acid in their stomaches dissolves the shells. If you go out on the Huntington Beach Pier and watch the scoters stripping mussels off the pilings, you will see them leaving behind white clouds of calcium carbonate when they deficate.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2008, 2:11 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
royce10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,869
Default

penolta wrote:
Quote:
Good shots as usual, Hung. Probably the same pelican I was photographing -we cam compare pictures (most of mine are in four threads in the Pentax forum) and see if it is the same bird. He is living dangerously diving between the pilings that way (I got splashed, too), but the shade of the bridge makes it easier to see the fish.

Good catch (for both you and the bird) of the grebe with the Silversides - looks almost too big for it to swallow - I usually see them with much smaller fish (pipefishes are their favorites in Bolsa Chica, and it is fun to see them wrapping themselves around the birds necks!). I also have a lot of grebe pictures (both eared and pied-billed, but I decided not to post them, because you can tell from the way their feathers are wet and sticking together that they are all oiled. Water flows into that portion of the refuge from two sources - a drainage canal and Huntington Harbour Marina; when it rains, oil from the streets runs into the canal, and oil from boat motors in the Marina floats in, too, so there is (or was a couple of weeks ago) a light film of oil on the water (you can't always see it, but you can tell by how long bubbles persist on the surface). Grebes are particularly vulnerable because they repeatedly dive and surface through the film - they do not fly readily and tend to stay in the same areas for a long time, and when they try to clean their feathers, they swallow the oil along with the feathers they must ingest. Grebes are unique in that they lack a sphincter muscle at the end on their stomachs, and swallow feathers to filter out fish bones, which they then cough up wrapped in the feathers as pellets. So they suffer both from hypothermia and oil toxicity, and are the most severely affected by oil spills which take a heavy toll on them. In the infamous Santa Barbara oil spill, the Western Grebes were decimated because they were massing for migration in huge numbers at the time, and their carcasses washed up on beaches all along the coast; their numbers have never been the same locally, and the American Trader spill off Huntington Beach also accounted for many more of them.

You wondered about the Scoter swallowing mollusc shells - the acid in their stomaches dissolves the shells. If you go out on the Huntington Beach Pier and watch the scoters stripping mussels off the pilings, you will see them leaving behind white clouds of calcium carbonate when they deficate.
Hello Penolta. Yes all of these pelican pics are from just 1 bird. You will notice that it has a "scar" of white feathers on its left wing. It does dive very close to the bridge. I sometimes think that it will not dive in time and will hit the bridge.

Thanks for the info on the Eared Grebes and Scoter. Sucks that they are affected by the oil spils so much...

- Hung
royce10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2008, 2:32 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Quote:
all of these pelican pics are from just 1 bird. You will notice that it has a "scar" of white feathers on its left wing.
Same one - this is a crop from a larger frame in the tandem diving thread. It hasn't hit a piling yet, but it scraped that wing on something!
Attached Images
 
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2008, 6:45 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
bmullen@comcast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,435
Default

Super stuff, Hung!
bmullen@comcast is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:55 PM.