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Old Nov 10, 2009, 2:03 PM   #11
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Great shots Roger. That first one is the first I have ever seen where it looks like the facial disc could be erected. Marsh Harriers hunt in the daylight in part by sound, using the disc (like owls do at night) to localize the sounds of rodents rustling in the grass, so that is why they fly so low over the marsh. Neat capture.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 3:54 PM   #12
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Penolta- again great and little known info about birds. I have noticed the facial disc on Owls when taking their pix, but until now did not realize how that 'disc' was part of their predatory system.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 4:11 PM   #13
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Penolta- again great and little known info about birds. I have noticed the facial disc on Owls when taking their pix, but until now did not realize how that 'disc' was part of their predatory system.
Les, Owls are even more dependent upon sound, as their eyes are fixed and immovable (not so in the Harriers) - they rely on sound to point their heads in the right direction in the dark. As a result they can turn their heads as much as 180 degrees in either direction to localize a sound from a perch as well as to make up for the lack of eye mobility. Their actual ears are also asymmetrical to aid in precise directional localization.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 4:56 PM   #14
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Les, Owls are even more dependent upon sound, as their eyes are fixed and immovable (not so in the Harriers) - they rely on sound to point their heads in the right direction in the dark. As a result they can turn their heads as much as 180 degrees in either direction to localize a sound from a perch as well as to make up for the lack of eye mobility. Their actual ears are also asymmetrical to aid in precise directional localization.
I have a number of shots of these birds, where it's difficult to tell from the head that it's Not an owl. Very peculiar...

When I was a kid, they were the "Marsh Hawk, not Northern Harrier. The Peregrine was known as the Duck Hark, the Sharp Shinned as the Pigion Hawk - And so on. I much prefer the folk names...

Marsh Hawk

There was a pause in the moment,
The bright air filled with sun
was darkened,
darkened only by a fragment
seen from the corner of my eye.

A dark bird slid into view.
Dark,
much darker then any Gull.
A tiny cloud that even so,
darkened the brilliant sun.

A sinister beauty
yet,
Without a touch of evil
Anymore then the angel of death
is evil.

A merciless force
And yet it was grace
It was power
It was death on wings

And it flew through the marsh
Through the tall grass
flying as no Hawk I had ever seen
Just feet from the ground.
It’s soaring wings,
not straight, but angled for quick doom
For a sudden turn
as its prey,
having no warning of high soaring wings
Would be faced by dropping
beauty and disaster.

Dave
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 5:50 PM   #15
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I have a number of shots of these birds, where it's difficult to tell from the head that it's Not an owl. Very peculiar...

Dave
Short-eared Owls hunt the marshes in the same way at dawn and dusk, so you have to be careful not to mistake one for the other.
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 7:08 PM   #16
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Short-eared Owls hunt the marshes in the same way at dawn and dusk, so you have to be careful not to mistake one for the other.
Indeed they do, and I have some shots of then as well. The Ravens beat the crap out of them, whereas the Marsh Hawk just spits in their general direction and ignores them.

Dave
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Old Nov 10, 2009, 7:14 PM   #17
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Les, Owls are even more dependent upon sound, as their eyes are fixed and immovable (not so in the Harriers) - they rely on sound to point their heads in the right direction in the dark. As a result they can turn their heads as much as 180 degrees in either direction to localize a sound from a perch as well as to make up for the lack of eye mobility. Their actual ears are also asymmetrical to aid in precise directional localization.


Penolta thanks again for providing information about wildlife. I always enjoy your posts and the info...it's an education.

This past year I've been fortunate and was able to get a number of pix of different Owls in my area. Barred Owls, Great Horned Owls, Northern Hawk Owls.

I also know where there are Great Grey Owls and Marsh Harriers....after seeing Roger's wonderful pictures I am motivated to go out to see if can find some subjects for pix.

Up here, the Marsh Harriers have probably gone south for the winter, but the Great Grey's should be around (very secretative -I may not be able to find) and we usually get a few Snowy Owls during the winter.

I'll be out over the next months with my K10D and 55-300.
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Old Nov 11, 2009, 2:13 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Hards80 View Post
great set. lovely sharpness, great action, great oof areas. thanks for sharing. nicely done.
Your welcome

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Originally Posted by Chato View Post
These are such unusual Hawks, with their habit of just slimming the tops of the grass, wings held to make a 90 degree turn. They always spook me, when I see them coming over the marsh.

These are the best shots of them I've ever seen. (And don't you wish they still kept the folk name, "the Marsh Hawk?")

Well done!

Dave
Thanks Dave for the nice words

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Originally Posted by Bynx View Post
Nice order in posting. The pics kept getting better and better. A great series.
Thabnks Bynx

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Originally Posted by bhammitt View Post
Congrats Roger, these are some of the best bird shots I have ever seen on these forums!!!

Thanks for the nice comment.

Bob
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Originally Posted by gjtoth View Post
Great series, Robert. Encore!
Thanks a bunch Robert

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Originally Posted by smac View Post
I must agree with the others Roger. These are outstanding. I tried for several years before I got even one good shot of a Harrier and I'm still trying.
Excellent series of shots. Color me green.
YUP!! on they are tuff to get

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Originally Posted by lesmore49 View Post
Great Roger...the Harrier looks as if it's keeping it's eyes on you..what's the saying..."watch me like a Hawk..."

Although I think this saying is usually reserved for wives keeping an eye on their husbands.
Thanks for the make roger smile post.

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Originally Posted by Tallgrass05 View Post
As the Far Side cartoon said, "Birds of prey know they're cool."
she knows she is special.

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Originally Posted by nymphetamine View Post
very nice....wacky back to ur bush??
Thanks for the look and nice comment

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Originally Posted by penolta View Post
Great shots Roger. That first one is the first I have ever seen where it looks like the facial disc could be erected. Marsh Harriers hunt in the daylight in part by sound, using the disc (like owls do at night) to localize the sounds of rodents rustling in the grass, so that is why they fly so low over the marsh. Neat capture.
Thanks for the information Penolta.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lesmore49 View Post
Penolta- again great and little known info about birds. I have noticed the facial disc on Owls when taking their pix, but until now did not realize how that 'disc' was part of their predatory system.
Quote:
Originally Posted by penolta View Post
Les, Owls are even more dependent upon sound, as their eyes are fixed and immovable (not so in the Harriers) - they rely on sound to point their heads in the right direction in the dark. As a result they can turn their heads as much as 180 degrees in either direction to localize a sound from a perch as well as to make up for the lack of eye mobility. Their actual ears are also asymmetrical to aid in precise directional localization.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chato View Post
I have a number of shots of these birds, where it's difficult to tell from the head that it's Not an owl. Very peculiar...

I am sure we all would enjoy seeing your shots.

When I was a kid, they were the "Marsh Hawk, not Northern Harrier. The Peregrine was known as the Duck Hark, the Sharp Shinned as the Pigion Hawk - And so on. I much prefer the folk names...

Marsh Hawk

There was a pause in the moment,
The bright air filled with sun
was darkened,
darkened only by a fragment
seen from the corner of my eye.

A dark bird slid into view.
Dark,
much darker then any Gull.
A tiny cloud that even so,
darkened the brilliant sun.

A sinister beauty
yet,
Without a touch of evil
Anymore then the angel of death
is evil.

A merciless force
And yet it was grace
It was power
It was death on wings

And it flew through the marsh
Through the tall grass
flying as no Hawk I had ever seen
Just feet from the ground.
Itís soaring wings,
not straight, but angled for quick doom
For a sudden turn
as its prey,
having no warning of high soaring wings
Would be faced by dropping
beauty and disaster.

Dave
Coooool, thank you

Quote:
Originally Posted by penolta View Post
Short-eared Owls hunt the marshes in the same way at dawn and dusk, so you have to be careful not to mistake one for the other.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chato View Post
Indeed they do, and I have some shots of then as well. The Ravens beat the crap out of them, whereas the Marsh Hawk just spits in their general direction and ignores them.

Dave
Quote:
Originally Posted by lesmore49 View Post
Penolta thanks again for providing information about wildlife. I always enjoy your posts and the info...it's an education.

This past year I've been fortunate and was able to get a number of pix of different Owls in my area. Barred Owls, Great Horned Owls, Northern Hawk Owls.

I also know where there are Great Grey Owls and Marsh Harriers....after seeing Roger's wonderful pictures I am motivated to go out to see if can find some subjects for pix.

Up here, the Marsh Harriers have probably gone south for the winter, but the Great Grey's should be around (very secretative -I may not be able to find) and we usually get a few Snowy Owls during the winter.

I'll be out over the next months with my K10D and 55-300.
Good luck, go get them.
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Old Nov 12, 2009, 8:05 PM   #19
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hey Roger! these are all great, but #2 and #4 are simply superb!
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Old Nov 15, 2009, 8:59 PM   #20
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hey Roger! these are all great, but #2 and #4 are simply superb!

Thanks Rocky, she made for a fun day.
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