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Old Jul 15, 2004, 1:27 AM   #11
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I love the birds and the background blur, especially on the last photograph where you have the magnificently sharp lines definingthe birdagainst a background that is farther away than usual with the songbird photographs. It creates a perspective that gives me a "rush" when I look at it. Great photos!
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 8:45 AM   #12
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We had a similar "display" at a museum here. The birds were brought down from a wildlife refuge in the Grants Pass area. All of the birds were salvaged or raised in captivity so they could not return. I had a terrible time photographing them. I had two ceiling mounted spot lights. All ISO 400 with my Panasonic FZ10. The took the birds out of their traveling crates for less than ten minutes each. My pigmy owl shot did not come out as people were in my way. There is a lesson here, sit as close as you can. Flash would have been inapropriate but there was a museum employee there using her flash and her Canon point and shoot. Anyway, take a look, http://heather2.smugmug.com/gallery/163628/1/6107671
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 9:31 AM   #13
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Hi, soOregon! I took a look at your gallery and I think that you have some pretty nice pictures posted up there. I think that some of the pictures of the owl came out just fine. Sure, the owl wasn't uniformly lit up so you lose detail in the shadow areas but I think that for this type of photo it adds to the mystique of the subject. I agree that the eagle came out way too dark.

You mention a pygmy owl but the only owl I see in those pictures appears to be a barn owl. Also, is the hawk that is pictured a Swainson's Hawk?
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 11:04 AM   #14
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What I have on Smugmug is a barn owl, a golden eagle and a ferruginous hawk. They stuffed the pigmy owl back in the crate after five minutes. It was the first bird they showed and I was still adjusting my camera a bit and the pigmy owl pix are blurry. All of the pictures were very grainy with the lighting. Something like Neatimage fixes the background but you lose the detail in the feathers. Some of the photos are just how they are, I really didn't work on them much. I experimented with the saturation and in some blurring out the background. I've printed the f.hawk and handler as an 8X10 at home and it is a really neat picture. If your end result is a print, with my flat screen monitor, etc., you can never tell what kind of a print the photo would make by looking at it on the screen.

My seat wasn't the best. At times the people in front blocked my lens, at times the handler blocked the bird and at times the presenter blocked everything. I came with the expectation they would do this presentation outside, oh well ...
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 11:16 AM   #15
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Thanks for the clarification on the hawk id, soOregon. Honestly, I'd never seen a Ferruginous Hawk with that rusty band across the breast and the field guides I have do not mention it as an identifying characteristic. I have since found a website with some photos looking like this one that identifies this version of the Ferruginous as the light morph of the hawk. Raptors can be difficult because of the variations in plumage even within the same species!
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 11:49 AM   #16
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Geoffs,
The red tail was on a separate day, and I was actually going out with the express purpose to find it. So I knew exactly what it was. But with that tail it's fairly clear. It's not technically an albino because it wouldn't have color at all, the real name starts with "lut" something. I don't remember what it is.

The real advantage of having my friend along was that he could spot them fast. What really bugs me is that if I'd stayed later that day I would have seen a snowy owl (from really far away) and some short eared owls (really close.) But I had to go. Next time!

Eric
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Old Jul 15, 2004, 12:12 PM   #17
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Thanks for filling in the info, Eric. I can't remember the term either, but it does start with "lut", for the whiter plumaged color variations of these raptors (luteinaceous???).

When I said albinistic, I didn't mean to say that it was an albino, which would have implied lack of any coloration, but rather that it had tendencies to being lighter colored.

Too bad you missed the snowy and short-eared owls. You've got to make another date with your friend. :-)
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