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Old Feb 28, 2005, 8:48 PM   #1
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All taken with Drebel, 135-400 w/1.4x tc.

A pretty tight crop on this one. ISO 400, 1/125, F5.6, 560mm

NR, Cropped, FM, resized, levels, selective USM and NR again.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 8:53 PM   #2
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This is the same pic as the first one only just a tiny bit of cropping. I wanted to see which one is liked the best. Feel free to comment.




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Old Feb 28, 2005, 8:57 PM   #3
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ISO 400, 1/250, F5.6, 560mm

NR, USM, Cropped some, resized, levels, FM, selective NR again.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 9:23 PM   #4
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Hi Houston, I like the wider one as the more cropped one cuts off too much of the acorn for my personal tastes.

The bottom photo is a super pose and the colors are great but the bird itself is sharpened too much I think.


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Old Feb 28, 2005, 9:28 PM   #5
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Nice shots Houston.

Here's a suggestion that I sometimes, but not always, use. When part of the picture is clearly at the same range as my subject, I consider selecting it, along with the subject, and then inverting the selection to apply noise reduction or any kind of blurring. I think it can look a little off if a part of the picture that's clearly at the same range, and adjacent to, thesubject is blurred.

I'm not saying that's necessarily the case here, I'm just throwing out an idea . I'm far from an expert. You may have considered it already and rejected it for this shot. for all I know you added the pine cone after the fact hehe.
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Old Feb 28, 2005, 9:44 PM   #6
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Huston, those are really good. Very well done. Thanks for sharing with us. I like the second one best. The crop shares the world of the bird for me and where he lives yet allows the bird to be large enought to enjoy.
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Old Mar 1, 2005, 4:22 AM   #7
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Great exposure, contrast, and detail on the first pic. I like the wider crop
as well. It gives some perspective on the size of this little guy. I pretty
much agree with Norm on the second one. There is some noticable sharpenning
artifacts around the edges.
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Old Mar 1, 2005, 11:22 AM   #8
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Thanks to all of you for your helpful comments. I now realize that when I sharpened just the bird I should have included the pine cone also as it is a subject even though its not the main one. I think I have learned from this that if the bird is the only subject its OK to crop pretty tight but if there is another subject, such as the pine cone in this case, its better not to crop too much and leave both of the subjects in good view. I've just now learned how to do the selective sharpening and inverting etc. So, to all of you guys thanks again, I'll get there. I hope.

Houston
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Old Mar 1, 2005, 12:02 PM   #9
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Houston,

Just for clarification, I was trying to say that you might not want to apply noise reduction or any other filter that intentionally or unintentionally blurs to the pine cone. That's different than saying you want to sharpen the pine cone.

I suppose sharpening the pine cone is an option, but, as a general rule,I usually only apply sharpening (or unsharp mask) to my subjects. It can introduce noise and I hate noise.

It's really all a matter of taste I suppose. But I do think getting and using good (and appropriate) selections is arguably the most important part of post-processing and worthy of the extra time it can require. I'd guess that I spend probably over half my time getting good selections on any given picture in post processing.
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