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Old May 23, 2005, 3:33 PM   #11
djb
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your flying dragonflies simply, amaze me!!!!! how do you do it????!!! and so many of them???!!!

dennis
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Old May 24, 2005, 9:28 AM   #12
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djb wrote:
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your flying dragonflies simply, amaze me!!!!! how do you do it????!!! and so many of them???!!!

dennis
Thanks for the extremely kind comments dennis. The fairly good rate of successful shots on these dragonflies was really owing to their interesting behaviours. I think dragonflies can be at certain times inquisitive, or bold...and like to fly around or near people. I noticed that dragonflies get quite bold when it's quite sunny. They can also get very bold when it's sunny and fairly windy. For the photos I took of the banded flutterer dragonfly (which I later found to be called a graphic flutterer), this dragonfly kept fluttering slowly around me for 5 minutes and wouldn't go away. So it allowed me time to photograph it while it fluttered slowly. And for the big green dragonfly, it kept flying to and away from me...many times. So each time it began its run, I'd get have the camera ready to capture the photo once it came into the focusing range that I had set, which was about 2 metres. The repeated flight patterns of the dragonfly made it fairly predictable and convenient. But I still had to see the dragonfly in the viewfinder and take the photo when I thought that it was at the focus distance.

With the manual focusing at 2 metres distance, I would point the camera in roughly the direction that my shot was going to taken....in order to check the exposure. At this point, I do the well-known trick of pressing the shutter button half-way (and keep the button depressed) to lock the exposure. I would then sight the dragonfly with my eyes, just above the camera. Then I'd quickly move my eye down to the viewfinder to locate the dragonfly in the viewfinder. And then I'd take the photo when the dragonfly was approximately at the in-focus distance.
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Old May 24, 2005, 9:44 AM   #13
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Kenny, thanx for the info. I'll have to try that someday when, or if, it ever gets sunny and warmer here in Massachusetts. Iguess the best way is to catch them when they just hover and hope the movement of the camera in their direction doesn't spook them into moving. they are really fun to watch.

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Old May 27, 2005, 5:51 AM   #14
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You're welcome anytime dennis. I agree the best way is to wait for one to hover. It's amazing how they can do that, and can also pick up a lot of speed on demand. If you get some photos when good conditions come in massachusetts, post them up at anytime dennis. It'd be fantastic to see USA dragonflies. I don't think I even saw one when I was in Colorado ... for 3 years!
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