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Old Apr 15, 2006, 12:18 PM   #1
DBB
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A flock of these guys arrived in Brooklyn and happily distribute themselves in the various undeveloped forests around the beaches. (Marine Flickers?)

They're leary birds, and I've always had trouble getting close (not to be compared with the Kindfishers of course )

The first shot is about 60 percent frame, the rest are close crops. He was about 120 feet away. Fortunately the light was Perfect, my new method of holding the monopode eliminates camera shake. Enjoy!

[img]www.davidbarkinphotography.com/Temp/FLICKER121.jpg[/img]

[img]www.davidbarkinphotography.com/Temp/FLICKER119.jpg[/img]

[img]www.davidbarkinphotography.com/Temp/FLICKER122.jpg[/img]

[img]www.davidbarkinphotography.com/Temp/FLICKER124.jpg[/img]

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Old Apr 15, 2006, 4:04 PM   #2
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I had some of the red-shafted (western) variety in my front yard this winter. They don't usually do that except that there was an ice storm happening and my yard presented better feeding opportunity than other places that day. Usually they are, as you mentioned, a bit more shy and difficult to approach.

This is a good series and I really like how you got the capture where the yellow-shafted feathers are visible (pic #3). For close crops those last 3 are pretty good! What lens were you using?
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Old Apr 15, 2006, 4:24 PM   #3
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Wow, that a teriffic shot! I don't think I've ever seen the yellow on this bird so well!
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Old Apr 15, 2006, 6:23 PM   #4
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geoffs wrote:
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I had some of the red-shafted (western) variety in my front yard this winter. They don't usually do that except that there was an ice storm happening and my yard presented better feeding opportunity than other places that day. Usually they are, as you mentioned, a bit more shy and difficult to approach.

This is a good series and I really like how you got the capture where the yellow-shafted feathers are visible (pic #3). For close crops those last 3 are pretty good! What lens were you using?
Yeah, from time to time I don't have a problem, but usually, it's a piece of brown vanishing in the tree-tops. Had some great opportunities last year - looking forward to this - they make great photographs.

I'm using the Swarovski spotting scope, with the 1100 mm adapter. I'm staying with that until I master it, and then back to the 800mm for action shots...:lol:

With the 1100mm, it's 1/1000 Tops, and that only for Egrets and Gulls. But since my discovery of Noise Ninja, swtiching to the 800, will allow speeds of 1/2000 - so I'm looking forward to finally nailing these little guys flying.

As I said the light was perfect! I was standing at a 40 degree angle to the sun, which is turn, depending on the position of the bird, allowed me to catch them just right, with out glare. Note that the bird turned into the sun, illuminating the tail, while with the bird turned toward me, the tail was in shadow.

And I did work out a rather bizzare way of using my monopode, which has led to an elimination of camera shake, which with this "lens" and slow speed, is a nightmare.

I used to more or less shoot handheld, even though I use a monopode.

I lean it on the tip of my boot or even better into the tongue, where it meets the tip. Took a few trips to get used to, but it works out in the majority of cases.

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Old Apr 15, 2006, 6:36 PM   #5
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Heck, I knew you usually shoot with that Swarovski telescope :roll:, but when you had said that you were using a monopod you fooled me. I didn't think you'd used anything but a tripod with that kind of focal length!

I've used a monopod in the past but sometimes I think that I'm unsteadier with it than just handheld. I've obviously not got the monopod "technique" down. From the look of these images, especially the cropped ones, I'd say that your monopod methodology is very good indeed!
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Old Apr 15, 2006, 8:36 PM   #6
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Awesome! I've not yet got a good one of one of these.
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Old Apr 15, 2006, 8:38 PM   #7
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geoffs wrote:
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Heck, I knew you usually shoot with that Swarovski telescope :roll:, but when you had said that you were using a monopod you fooled me. I didn't think you'd used anything but a tripod with that kind of focal length!

I've used a monopod in the past but sometimes I think that I'm unsteadier with it than just handheld. I've obviously not got the monopod "technique" down. From the look of these images, especially the cropped ones, I'd say that your monopod methodology is very good indeed!
I use a carbon monopode, no head. TYhe whole thing weighs less than a pound. And I HEAR you about them being unsteady!

Yes indeed. Now the rule for Digiscoping is USE A TRIPOD. I laugh at that rule. Of course it was almost six months before my images started coming out right....

Last fall I switched to the 1100mm. It has better defintion than the 800. But then I was forced to shoot ISO 800, which I had never done.

At any rate, I went to a page that gave monopode positioning. None of them work with my set-up. The monopode is mounted on the scope. All the, "right foot foward, left foot back, just doesn't hack it. I can't get behind the camera! So about a month ago I once again started thinking of a way to become steadier.

Well, sticking the camera on my boot tip, or the tongue, actually works. It's always "adjustable." It took about 600 shots to get used to it. But the imporvements are really noticable! I can now take some shots at 1/100, and with this set-up....

I must say, these Flicker shots were at 1/400. Even so, from that distance, ANY movement translates into a blur. And as you can see....

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Old Apr 16, 2006, 12:05 AM   #8
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Dave, really nice shots!!! The few flickers I see are usually on the ground. Today, the first time I get to shoot them in a tree I got lucky and got a mating pair. though they were far off and backlit. Oh well!! These are excellent!!

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