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Old Apr 30, 2006, 10:59 PM   #1
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I was out on a whale watch today and took these photos, it was mostly cloudy, but some sun, I had a circular polarizerand haze filters on these just like I was told to do on days like today and this is the result
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Old Apr 30, 2006, 10:59 PM   #2
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Another but worse
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Old May 1, 2006, 8:04 AM   #3
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Due to the lighting conditions, the camrera couldn't produce enough contrast. You can fix this some in post processing. Here is an example of just using the auto contrast enhancement in Elements 4.
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Old May 1, 2006, 11:47 AM   #4
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Nikki P wrote:
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I had a circular polarizer and haze filters on these just like I was told to do on days like today and this is the result
I would never use a polariser on a cloudy day...:blah:

It has one real use and one beneficial side effect. It is used to reduce glare. So if you're shooting into or almost into the sun, they are very useful. The side efffect of using them is to increase the saturation of color in a pleasent way. A good filter to have around.

But I really can't see any use for them at all in a cloudy day. All that happens is that you give up two f stops, and get nothing back.

Dave
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Old May 1, 2006, 12:03 PM   #5
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thanks, so I could use it on a bright sunny day out on the water?
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Old May 1, 2006, 1:38 PM   #6
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Nikki P wrote:
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thanks, so I could use it on a bright sunny day out on the water?
Absolutely! If you had the sun at some sort of angle BEHIND you, it would be useful if you could afford to give up the f stops, it will saturate color very well. And if the sun is in the direction you are shooting, it will cut down on glare.

In other words, it's Really useful shooting Into the sun, and you might find you like or dislike it, shooting with the sun behind you.

I suggest shooting with it on and off and see what it does for YOUR satisfaction.

Other uses include shooting at glass, to remove glare, etc, etc. It's a good filter.

Dave
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Old May 1, 2006, 3:03 PM   #7
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Thank you for your help, I am learning all this stuff and especially taking photos on the water.
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Old May 1, 2006, 3:44 PM   #8
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DBB wrote:
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Nikki P wrote:
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thanks, so I could use it on a bright sunny day out on the water?
Absolutely! If you had the sun at some sort of angle BEHIND you, it would be useful if you could afford to give up the f stops, it will saturate color very well. And if the sun is in the direction you are shooting, it will cut down on glare.

In other words, it's Really useful shooting Into the sun, and you might find you like or dislike it, shooting with the sun behind you.
polarizers are not much good at all shooting into the sun. they serve only as a crude ND filter in that situation, and may actually make the glare worse, since the extra layer of filter glass can present additional reflections which could lead to ghosting or lens flare.there are specific formulas to calclulate the angles (relative to thedirection of the sun)at which they provide thegreatest polarizing effect, but shooting into the sun, they're no better than putting a piece of dark glass in front of your lens. they will cut down the brightness, but that's about it.

what they are good at is reducing reflected glare, such as from water or glass. that's why they're very useful shooting on the water on sunny days. if the skyis blue, not overcast,they also do a good job of increasing the contrast between sky and clouds or landscape, and increasing color saturation (that's how photographers get those impossibly deep blue skies ). on a cloudy day, they serve little or no useful purpose.
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Old May 1, 2006, 3:56 PM   #9
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Nikki, you didn't mention what your camera settings were. it looks like there wasn't enough contrast, as Dave mentioned, mainly due to the horrid lighting conditions. in this situation, the polarizer probably did you more harm than good, since it reduced the amount of light through your lens on what was already a pretty gloomy day. in that light, there's not much you can do to overcome the monotone colors... gray sky, gray water, and darker gray whale... so all you can do is get the best shutter speed the light will allow, then boost the contrast in PP and hope for the best. whatever you do, though, on a day like that, never use any filter that costs you a stop or more of light, like a polarizer does...
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Old May 1, 2006, 4:23 PM   #10
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squirl033 wrote:
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Nikki, you didn't mention what your camera settings were. it looks like there wasn't enough contrast, as Dave mentioned, mainly due to the horrid lighting conditions. in this situation, the polarizer probably did you more harm than good, since it reduced the amount of light through your lens on what was already a pretty gloomy day. in that light, there's not much you can do to overcome the monotone colors... gray sky, gray water, and darker gray whale... so all you can do is get the best shutter speed the light will allow, then boost the contrast in PP and hope for the best. whatever you do, though, on a day like that, never use any filter that costs you a stop or more of light, like a polarizer does...

Sorry, I didn't mean Shooting "into" the Sun. Nothing will do you any good there, except for pumping up the speed to 1/6000 and enjoying your perfect silouette...:?

Rather, I meant shooting in the "direction" of the sun...

Nikki didn't mention the speed of the shot, but a polariser costs you two stops, and I suspect speed is an issue. When that tail flips down, it moves as fast as a birds wing.

Dave
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