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Old May 4, 2006, 8:17 AM   #21
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In this corner we have ERIC a man from BOSTON and in the other corner DAVE from NY..... can these cities ever agree on anything? :lol: Who's better Ortiz or Arod?

Okay, that was fun and all, but good job Eric! :G
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Old May 4, 2006, 8:48 AM   #22
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I give most of the credit to being a bird watcher for almost 10 years (with a heavy concentration of raptor watching in the winter... what else do we have up here in the winter?) and photographing birds for 3+ years..... but my real secret weapon:
"A Photographic Guide to North American Raptors" by Brian Wheeler & William Clark
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...644X&itm=1

A really great book for hawk watching and identifying. It has a picture of every plumage variation of every raptor in North America. And at each bird it includes a section talking about what looks like it and how to tell them apart. Great book.

TTfoto,
I appreciate the offer, but I sell my images. I *want* to have a photo of an adult merlin that is that good that I can call my own. From a critical standpoint I'd prefer the bird box wasn't in the background, but that is just being picky. For presentations, having on in your back yard makes perfect sense. They hunt other birds for food.

Eric


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Old May 4, 2006, 12:46 PM   #23
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eric s wrote:
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I give most of the credit to being a bird watcher for almost 10 years (with a heavy concentration of raptor watching in the winter... what else do we have up here in the winter?) and photographing birds for 3+ years..... but my real secret weapon:
"A Photographic Guide to North American Raptors" by Brian Wheeler & William Clark
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...9111644X&itm=1

A really great book for hawk watching and identifying. It has a picture of every plumage variation of every raptor in North America. And at each bird it includes a section talking about what looks like it and how to tell them apart. Great book.

TTfoto,
I appreciate the offer, but I sell my images. I *want* to have a photo of an adult merlin that is that good that I can call my own. From a critical standpoint I'd prefer the bird box wasn't in the background, but that is just being picky. For presentations, having on in your back yard makes perfect sense. They hunt other birds for food.

Eric
It does at first glance look like a Merlin. It would be a Male if it was. But I have a problem with the I.d.

Note those white lines running up the side feathers of the tail. The Merlins do not have this. Their white is limited to the central feathers - none on the sides, whereas the Prairie Falcon does have them. And of course the Prairie Falcon has a dark morph that looks like this, except that the spots are darker.

To be honest here I'm not sure. How about asking the O.P. how large the bird was? A Merlin isn't much bigger than a Robin.

I'm prepared to eat Crow. Crow is not bad if eaten with a large amount of spices... :?

Here's an Eastern Merlin, unfortunatly with no tail feathers visible.



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Old May 4, 2006, 1:06 PM   #24
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DBB wrote:
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To be honest here I'm not sure. How about asking the O.P. how large the bird was? A Merlin isn't much bigger than a Robin.

Well, this guy was quite bigger than a robin for sure. No doubt about that.

How tall was it? Hmmm....less than a foot. But not by much. I'd say 10 inches tall.

Once it took off, it had quite a large wingspan. Cant say how big, as it took off away from me.

TT
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Old May 4, 2006, 2:14 PM   #25
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TTfoto wrote:
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DBB wrote:
Quote:

To be honest here I'm not sure. How about asking the O.P. how large the bird was? A Merlin isn't much bigger than a Robin.

Well, this guy was quite bigger than a robin for sure. No doubt about that.

How tall was it? Hmmm....less than a foot. But not by much. I'd say 10 inches tall.

Once it took off, it had quite a large wingspan. Cant say how big, as it took off away from me.

TT
You're NOT supposed to say that....

How can I make believe I know what's real if you keep interjecting facts that I don't want to hear? :G

Ok, A Merlin AND a Robin are both about ten inches long. Actually the Merlin is twelve inches long, the Robin, ten. The Merlin also has a wingspan of about 23 inches.

For comparison, a Red Tailed Hawk (a fairly large Hawk) stands 24 inches high with a four foot wingspan. A Prairie Falcon (depending on sex) is about 15 to 19 inches long with a 35 to 43 inch wingspan.

So, think of a Robin standing next to your Pterodactly, and tell us how much longer than the Robin?

Dave
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Old May 4, 2006, 2:23 PM   #26
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Robin as in the one in the link below is about half the size of a Merlin. Are we talking about the same bird?

http://www.rspb.org/birds/guide/r/robin/index.asp
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Old May 4, 2006, 3:40 PM   #27
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I think they mean American robin, not European robin.

Looks like a Merlin to me (male), being from the UK I don't know what the other birds look like apart from in phots/drawings, but I would put my house on this being a Merlin (been a birdwather all my life, so have seen a few).
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Old May 4, 2006, 3:43 PM   #28
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meercat wrote:
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I think they mean American robin, not European robin.

Looks like a Merlin to me (male), being from the UK I don't know what the other birds look like apart from in phots/drawings, but I would put my house on this being a Merlin (been a birdwather all my life, so have seen a few).
Yes, the American Robin, actually some sort of Thrush, is a big songbird...:?

When Europeans came here, they must have had time on their hands (starving to death will do that) so they tryed to name North American Birds after something vaguely familiar.

Dave
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Old May 4, 2006, 3:54 PM   #29
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Interesting fact: In Mary poppins (the film) she has a (stuffed) American robin singing to her while in london!?!:-)
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Old May 5, 2006, 3:27 AM   #30
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DBB wrote:
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So, think of a Robin standing next to your Pterodactly, and tell us how much longer than the Robin?

Dave

OK...first off let me say again that I'm by no means an expert. In fact, I never shoot birds. He just happened to be there posing for me so why not.

Sorry if I confused some people, but it was not intentional.

As for the size comparison, I can estimate that he was about 50% taller (longer) than a robin. He was also quite a bit "thicker" than a robin. Very sorry that I can't be more specific than that, but I did not make a mental note of it. However, if it's THAT important, I can maybe measure the "bird box" as a direct comparison.

Hope I don't have to go that far, but if I must...I will.



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