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Old Sep 2, 2009, 8:41 AM   #4
JimC
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Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
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Also keep in mind that you'll have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnification) using a camera model with an APS-C size sensor. For cameras using a Sony APS-C size sensor (as the D60 uses), just multiply the focal length of the lens by 1.5x to see what focal length you'd need on a 35mm camera for the same angle of view. For example, a 100mm lens on a D60 would give you the same angle of view that you'd get using a 150mm lens on a 35mm camera (100mm x 1.5 = 150mm). For Canon dSLR models using a Canon APS-C size sensor (which is slightly smaller compared to the Sony APS-C size sensor used in your Nikon D60), use 1.6x instead.

IOW, that 28-80mm lens would give you the same angle of view on a D60 that you'd have using a 42-120mm lens on a 35mm camera. That's great if you want a longer focal length, but can present problems when you need a wider angle of view (for example group shots indoors where you may not be able to back up far enough to fit everyone into the frame, or a photo of a tree or buildings where the wide end of the zoom range with that kind of lens may be too long on a camera using an APS-C size sensor if you don't have room to back up further.

That's one reason that kit lenses with models using an APS-C size sensor usually start out at around 18mm. For example, a Nikkor 18-55mm lens on that camera would give you approximately the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-82mm lens on a 35mm camera (roughly the same range you had with your 28-80mm lens on a 35mm camera -- again, just multiply the focal length by 1.5x to see how they compare).
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