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Old Sep 13, 2003, 9:47 PM   #1
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Default filter before or after lens

ok, i have a d7hi a "blue sky filter" (close to a uv filter) and a wide angle lens
i want to know what order i should i put them in, does it mater

so should i put the filter on the camera then the lens in to the filter

or the lens on the camera and the filter on the lens
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Old Sep 13, 2003, 11:24 PM   #2
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IMO you should put it on last... Put it on before will increase the distance between the camera's lens and the WA converter creating more vignetting!

... However why do you need to put it on at all? Unless it's for protection since it's close to a UV and any glass will do that (ie the WA attacment perform some of that function already)!
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Old Sep 23, 2003, 10:30 PM   #3
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Filters are always applied to the end of a lens. You want the filtered light to pass through the lens before being imaged onto the film plane. Besides, I don't think that your camera will be able to accept the filter onto the camera body without the lens attached first. (But I could be wrong, 8)).

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Old Sep 24, 2003, 3:08 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laserjock
Filters are always applied to the end of a lens.
Hmmm, it may not be the case. Many super-telephoto, fisheye and mirror lenses have drop-in filters that are near the back of the lens. So, whether a filter should be added to the front of a lens or somewhere in th rear section depends on lens design. Some telephoto lenses accept filters in the front or as drop-in. In general, if a lens does not have a drop-in filter slot and has a front thread, it is assumed that the lens will accept front-mounting filters. Adding a rear-mounting filter will increase the gap between the last element of the converter and the front element of the on-camera lens. As a result, it is easy to cause vignetting and could also reduce optical quality a little.

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Old Sep 24, 2003, 1:00 PM   #5
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So.. how does one screw a filter on a bayonet mount (found on the camera body of many cameras?)

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Old Sep 24, 2003, 2:04 PM   #6
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They are really small, and in the case of my mirror tele they are put into a sliding "tray" about 2/3s the way back.
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Old Sep 24, 2003, 6:12 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laserjock
So.. how does one screw a filter on a bayonet mount (found on the camera body of many cameras?)
If the optic design requires a filter to be mounted in the rear end like many mirror lenses do, there will be a filter thread in the inner lens barrel for mounting filters. If a lens is designed to accept a filter somewhere in between, there is a chamber for a photographer to drop in a filter. Bayonet type filters are normally front-mounting ones (e.g., some Hassy old lenses).

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Old Nov 10, 2003, 12:52 AM   #8
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Default just experiment.

There's plenty of digi cameras that need an adaptor to add on lenses. eg with a 37mm. (not everyone has a digital SLR)

Then there's lots of lens adaptors that have 37mm threading.

if you've got a 37mm filter, it's quite conceivable to add the filter before the lens.
It's worth experimenting with, and posting your results on the forum.
It's bound to change the optics of the addon lens, but if you like the results, go with it.
People pay plenty of for extension tubes, so this doesn't seem an aliend concept here.
It may be less likely to suit wideangle, but if it's disasterous surely that depends on the optics in the camera, and inthe addon lens.

no harm in trying... it's not like you're payig for film+developing.
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