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Old May 4, 2004, 1:36 PM   #1
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I wanted to know if you can use additional Tele/Wide lenses on a Canon S1-IS other than the 2 Canon lenses, WC-DC52A and/or TC-DC52B.
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Old May 4, 2004, 2:49 PM   #2
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no, just the specific ones
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Old May 10, 2004, 1:10 PM   #3
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You can use the Raynox DCR conversions lens and all filters with 52mm ring.

First, you need the Canon Lens Adapter / Hood Set LAH-DC10.

You can visit:

http://www.raynox.co.jp/english/digital/egdigital.htm

and you can see that the S1 IS is included in the list of Canon cameras which are compatible with RAYNOX lens. The model DCR-2020PRO is really cool.

Bye


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Old May 24, 2004, 2:57 AM   #4
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You can use whichever 52mm lenses you like. I've purchased 3 filters, a telephoto and a super wide angle off eBay... cheapy ones, along with the Canon S1 IS adapter tube. They connect just fine. Threading is pretty standard for cameras.

jason
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Old Jun 16, 2004, 5:32 AM   #5
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regarding to this subject i'd like to ask about the canon 500d close-up lens. the company recommend it as an accesory for the s1 at http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/con...3&modelid=9824 (strangely the www.powershot.com/ site turned into a simple redirector), but after i've read about it at some reviews i don't understand what does it *exactly* gives me, how does it will expand the possibilities of the s1

at http://www.camerahobby.com/Access-Canon500D.htm i can read that "The 500 lenses are recommended for lenses in the 70mm to 300mm range." for expanding macro capabilities, but as we all know the s1 has a zoom range of 38-380 and smallest working distance is 10cm which is not a real macro-mode, but has a great power. i don't know what is the min. working dist. with a average 70-300 but think it's much more bigger and in that case the 500d really seems a help. but for the s1? i don't know.

you can read a short review here, too:
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/R...ns-Review.aspx

is there anybody here would be so kind to make me clear in this situation? do i need an 500d for s1 or not?

(btw it's totally shocked me that i can't find any information about this product at canon with their search function [http://search1.jp.canon.com/cgi-bin/...go=Search&n=20 and http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/con...27&Submit.y=7])

tia&bye
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Old Jun 18, 2004, 3:22 AM   #6
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baman wrote:
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is there anybody here would be so kind to make me clear in this situation? do i need an 500d for s1 or not?
Need? No. Want, that's another story...do you plan on doing severe closeups? The 500D is (from what I read on other sites) the equivalent of a +2 diopter (you can get diopter sets with a +1, +2, & +4 in one set).

Here's an example of a +7 diopter with a 300mm lens (taken with an Olympus C-700) to show what type of closeups you can get (I was actually, 5"/13cm away:
http://img4.photobucket.com/albums/0...up/uspenny.jpg

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Old Jun 21, 2004, 5:15 AM   #7
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what does "+2 diopter" mean? 2x magnification?
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Old Jun 24, 2004, 6:26 AM   #8
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baman wrote:
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what does "+2 diopter" mean? 2x magnification?
Go into any drugstore and you'll find a rack of reading glasses with a range of different "plus" or positive diopters. Older people have trouble reading because their eyes will no longer focus on something at a near distance. Normal eyes can focus on something as close as an inch, but now their minimum focus distance becomes a couple of feet, too far for comfortable reading. So they go to the drugstore and get a pair of reading glasses. The more farsighted they've become, the higher the positive diopter they'll need to buy. What the positive diopter does is allow their eyes to focus on something near again, basically by changing the effective focal length of the eye.

In the same way, your camera lens is farsighted. Reading the specifications for any camera lens you'll see that it has a minimum focal length (disregarding macro mode for now). When you want to make some small object appear large in your photo, the logical thing to do is zoom in as much as possible. But as you zoom from wide angle to telephoto, the minimum focus distance gets farther and farther away. So for small nearby objects it would seem there is no way to magnify it much because your camera lens won't focus on anything that near.

The answer to this problem is to buy a set of reading glasses for your camera. Close-up filters and macro lenses use positive diopters to allow your camera lens to focus on something closer than it normally would. There is a very interesting relationship between the diopter and the focus distance. A +1 will allow ANY LENS to focus on an object precisely 1 meter away with the lens focused on infinity, regardless of the focal length of the lens. A +2 will allow it to focus at 1/2 of a meter, a +4 at 1/4th of a meter, and if you combine a +2 and +4 you get a +6 which can focus at 1/6th of a meter. This works regardless of whether you have no zoom on your camera at all or a 10x zoom lens.

Obviously, if you think about this, the capacity of your lens to zoom in will determine the "magnification" you'll get. All the close-up filter does is change the focus distance. Also obviously if you think about it, the best way to make something bigger is to get closer, and to get closer you have to use the highest positive diopter you can manage, like a +4 or a combination of multiple filter (+4 and +4 equals +8, focusing at 1/8th meter).

Regarding the macro mode in your camera, it does something similar but to actually make something appear large you'll have to get within a couple of inches. It is often undesirable to be that close to the subject, as you will be blocking most of the ambient light and you'll scare away any live subject like insects. Close-up filters will often do a better job when combined with a high-power zoom camera (like the PowerShot S1 IS). Just remember to NOT use the macro mode when using close-up filters or macro lenses, and to have your focus locked on infinity. And, to compensate for the inevitably shallow depth of field, you have to use the smallest aperature you can manage, like F8, to increase the depth of field. And if you aren't at the right distance you won't be able to focus. +2=1/2m, no more, no less.

A complex answer to a simple question, but I hope it gives a better understanding of why close-up lenses can be nice to have around and how they work.

There's a really good article on all this at http://www.photographic.com/phototechniques/172/

Oh, and by the way, I just recently picked up a set of three (+1, +2, +4) close-up filters by Hoya, 52mm, for like $37 at B&H Photo (http://bhphoto.com). I've been ordering a lot from them lately because their prices are great on most items, they have a good rating at resellerratings.com and they always give you the option of shipping USPS for what is usually a much lower price than UPS or Fedex. Great store. I just looked on Canon's site to see how much they want for that single +2 500D filter: $105. That's insane. That's why I never buy anything but the camera from the manufacturer, no accessories. B&H has the 500D for $69, but you can get the fully multi-coated Hoya kit for $56. If you're at all interested in macro photography I'd go for the kit. Search for "hoya close-up 52mm" without the quotes.

(Of course I'm not affiliated with B&H in any way, I just think they kick a$$.)
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Old Jun 24, 2004, 6:33 AM   #9
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Bsbrady wrote:
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I wanted to know if you can use additional Tele/Wide lenses on a Canon S1-IS other than the 2 Canon lenses, WC-DC52A and/or TC-DC52B.
Does anyone have a clue about the effect on the image stabilization system of using other lenses? I read in a review for this camera that by holding down the IS button you can change the setting to work with the telephoto or wideangle lenses mentioned above. This suggest to me that while other lenses will be compatible with the threads and the lens itself, they won't be compatible with the IS feature, which is one of the main reasons to buy the PowerShot S1 IS. Comments?
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Old Jun 28, 2004, 6:11 AM   #10
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thanks for this great detailed explanation, RedBear!
it's a really nice gesture to work this big (write so much) for the others (like me :-) now i know what i must know.
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