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Old May 22, 2004, 4:23 AM   #1
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[align=center]I own a canon a80 and have the 37 mm adaptor on it. I have both the telephoto and wide angle lens. Question is for a UV filter add-on would i buy a 37mm and attach it straight to the adaptor and then connect my zoom lens to it. Or Do I need a bigger size filter to add at the end of the zoom lens? Thanks[/align]
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Old May 22, 2004, 9:48 AM   #2
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The answer to your question is not as simple as it might seem. Normally, you would put a uv filter on the end of each lens you have. However, I am not familiar with the a80, so I am not quite I understand your description.

Normally your lenses attach to the camera body and filters go on the end of the lenses. I am not sure what you are referring to when you say "adapter". If this is a step-up ring that allows you to use a filter that is larger than the filter ring on your lens, it goes on the front of the lens (away from camera body) and the filter attaches to the step-up ring.

You can stack filters by adding additional filters to the one already screwed into the step-up ring but stacking has some potential hazards associated with it. This is especially true on wide-angle lenses. When you start stacking filters, vignetting can occur. This is where the metal ring of the filter(s) becomes visible in the corners of the photo.

I have a Minolta S414 that has a filter size of 36.5mm! That filter size is almost impossible to find. I finally found a uv filter in that size at www.camerafilters.com. I also wanted a polarizing filter in that size but none were available. The nearest size they had was 42mm. However, they had a 36.5mm to 42mm stepup ring so I purchased the stepup and the 42mm polarizer. That combination works ok from mid zoom to full telephoto. But, when I zoom out to full wide-angle, I get severe vignetting.

I have said a lot here, but I'm not sure I have answered your question.
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Old May 22, 2004, 10:05 AM   #3
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Greetings,

Filters of any kind always go on the front of the final optical arrangement unless the lens is specifically designed to take filters further back. For instance, some mirror and other telephoto lenses are designed to take smaller filters in the internal optical path or at the rear.

However, UV filters are a total waste of time if you are thinking of one as having an effect on your images since glass itself absorbs UV and there is bound to be a lot more glass in your lens than in the part of your filter that is in the optical path. UV filters are a scam that only accomplishes increasing revenues for the companies that make them. If you are paranoid about protecting the front surface of your lens and you do outdoor photography consider a haze filter instead since that does have a slight effect on your image making. and can help on most outdoor days.

Hope thid helps.

Richard S.
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Old May 22, 2004, 12:07 PM   #4
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Haze filters and UV filters are essentially the same thing. It is correct that they have little effect on the image. Using them to protect the front element of a lens is very important, especially if you don't have a money tree in your back yard. When it comes to scratches or cracks, would you rather replace a $20 filter or a $500 lens. The answer is obvious. I have a uv filter on every lens of every camera I own.
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Old May 22, 2004, 2:34 PM   #5
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Thanks guys for the info....I need an adaptor on my camera so i can attach varous lenses. So would it work if I attach a filter and then a telephoto lens??
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Old May 22, 2004, 7:09 PM   #6
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I am still puzzled about your setup. Why do you need an adapter to attach lenses to the camera. Do these lenses attach directly to the camera body, replacing the supplied lens, or do they attach to the end of a built in, non-removeable lens. If the latter case is true, spacing between the addon lens and the built-in lens can be critical and you should place the filter on the front of the addon lens.

If your wide-angle or telephoto lens replaces the factory supplied lens, you should place the filter on the front of the addon lens.
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Old May 22, 2004, 7:28 PM   #7
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To use add on lens for the canon a80, you need to buy an adaptor to attach the lenses. So with an add-on 2x telephoto, you use both lenses.....it adds 2x telephoto to my 3x optical lens. My adaptor has 37 mm threads. I was hoping to add a filter and then my telephoto lens. Would this work? Thanks again
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Old May 24, 2004, 3:55 AM   #8
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I believe what he has is similar to my Canon S1 IS. The cameras have a built in optical zoom setup which protracts and retrcats as you change the zoom. On my old Casio this all happened inside an enclosed tube. On Canons this isn't an encapsulated phenomenon. To enable you to attach filters and other lenses you can purchase a tube which is threaded on one end (mine is 52mm) and then has the proprietary Canon lock on the other end to attach it to the camera body over the zooming aparatus.

I recently bought the S1 IS and soon after bought the appropriate tube/adaptor and a 52mm UV filter... er, lens protector

jason
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Old May 25, 2004, 8:12 AM   #9
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mmboost wrote:
Quote:
I believe what he has is similar to my Canon S1 IS. The cameras have a built in optical zoom setup which protracts and retrcats as you change the zoom. On my old Casio this all happened inside an enclosed tube. On Canons this isn't an encapsulated phenomenon. To enable you to attach filters and other lenses you can purchase a tube which is threaded on one end (mine is 52mm) and then has the proprietary Canon lock on the other end to attach it to the camera body over the zooming aparatus.

I recently bought the S1 IS and soon after bought the appropriate tube/adaptor and a 52mm UV filter... er, lens protector

jason
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Jason,
Quote:
Did you purchase the Canon tube adaptor or another? I'm looking to get one. I'd like it both light and durable. Comments appreciated! Thanks, Mike
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Old May 25, 2004, 6:06 PM   #10
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Vansmack:

I own an S400 with an adapter. You don't want to put filters behind the zoom/telephoto lenses because the weight of the lens puts the male threading of the filter in danger. The filter should be attached to the lens, not the adapter. And as said before, UV filters serve more of a purpose for protection than enhancing an image. You'd probably want a circular polarizer or neutral density filter for any light-reducing effects.

Hope this helps!
Johnny
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