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Old Nov 18, 2004, 1:22 PM   #1
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I just purchased an Olympus 5060. I am interested in a telephoto lens. I like to shoot sports and even with nature shots with very close up framing.

The Crystalvue 8 x 32 sharpshooter looks very impressive. I am unable to tell how much difference the TCON makes compared to the regular zoom and crystalvue though. Is there anyplace that has photo comparisons of both? The price is about double for the crystalvue. Also, as I understand it, you are really forced to use the crystalvue(maybe the TCON too?) at there maximum zoom in order to avoid vignetting. Is the crystalvue too much zoom? Does hand shake make it difficult to use with a tripod?

Any experience here would be appreciated.
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Old Nov 18, 2004, 4:14 PM   #2
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First shot is at 10x zoom (70mm) the other is same zoom with the the TCON 1.7. Can't tell you about the other lenses. (note, my Olympus TCON1.7 appears to be dif than one for yous, 55mm base vs 40.5 mm)

I think you could back the zoom off a bit before it started to go black on the edges, but, if you're going to back off much, you'd need to remove it.

You'll need to use a tripod or set the camera on something. You also might use the camera's timer or a remote to release the shutter.

I was realy into getting some high power zoom lenses, but I took a three-weeklong trip overseas with a WCON and a TCON, and hardly ever used the TCON.
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Old Nov 18, 2004, 4:15 PM   #3
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1.7TCON
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Old Nov 18, 2004, 5:07 PM   #4
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Thanks for the feedback. The camera I have is a 4x optical zoom. So, if I am understanding you, you feel that the 1.7x of extra zoom really adds a lot. Do I have that right?

I like to really get close up on sports stuff. Thanks for the feedback on needing a tripod as well.
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Old Nov 18, 2004, 8:46 PM   #5
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No, I don't think the difference is big… Basically it appears the 1.7 TCON takes it up the next step. However, I found I seldom used even that, I could only find the first (March) comparison shots. This ended up more of a novelty to me than a useful lens, unlike the .7 WCON (October) used scores of times.


I wonder how you'd capture a sport player with either of the lenses-especially an 8x. It's hard to get the subject with such a narrow field of view, and if they are moving-that's worse. The other mechanics of it, like how well either lens deals with subject movement-somebody else will have to help him out here. I could go as far to say that you could use your camera's great resolution and then crop it to get the subject you want.
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Old Nov 18, 2004, 10:25 PM   #6
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Panzergnome wrote:
Quote:
I wonder how you'd capture a sport player with either of the lenses-especially an 8x. It's hard to get the subject with such a narrow field of view, and if they are moving-that's worse. The other mechanics of it, like how well either lens deals with subject movement-somebody else will have to help him out here. I could go as far to say that you could use your camera's great resolution and then crop it to get the subject you want.
If you want some good shots of basketball players going in for a layup orbirds flying by, you're eventually going to want to use every available bit of (optical) zoom you have. It's worth the effort.

Just like anything else, shooting a moving target takes practice. You're right about the difficulty of spotting a target with the narrower field of view. In my experience, you have to learn to move your body the right way. A slight rotation at the right speed and suddenly your subject is in the center of your viewfinder.

You move differently, you feel different and the camera becomes more an extension of your body. I kind of like it, actually. I'd say in some ways it can become one of the defining moments of your photographic experience. (spouting off again... sorry)

Regards,

Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
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Old Nov 18, 2004, 10:31 PM   #7
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Actually, I am pretty good at shooting sports up tight. At least I used to be anyway. In my younger days I shot 35mm and later did several years working for ESPN doing field camera on football and basketball games. That shooting was a bit different though, because you could really rack the zoom to follow motion and get those sweet NFL films type of shots.

The digital world is a bit different for me though in that I cannot through the zoom around like I could on those cameras and so I have to pick and choose my spots better with these cameras. Also, I used to be right on the sidelines, and now I will be either in the stands, or in areas that are simply further away, thus my desire to get into higher power lenses.

I appreciate your feedback on the TCON though, it gives me a frame of reference. I think I need to dig around and try to find a retail store where I can actually try it out on my camera.
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