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Old Feb 11, 2010, 2:20 PM   #1
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Default Serious Baja

Brought home my new lens 35mm f/1.8 and was playing with it inside in low light. I need to work with it a lot more. All of my photos so far have a focal point and a lot of blur around the edges. I am a newbie so if you can give me quick fix (maybe I am just too close).

Here is my Parsons Jack Russell - Baja - and his serious face.
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 3:27 PM   #2
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Breana, this image was taken at f/1.8 which typically would produce a very shallow depth of field, even for a 35mm focal length. This explains why the eyes are in focus and the snout and ears are not. I imagine if you use smaller apertures such as f/4 - 4/8 you will find more of the image to be in focus. Be careful that at smaller apertures you will need to slow your shutter speed which may result in camera shake (use a tripod) or motion blur (shoot a still subject). Also, you might want to conduct a focus test using a chart such as http://focustestchart.com/focus21.pdf

If regardless of aperture your images are still blurred, then you may have a lens that has a calibration issue in which case I'd return it for a replacement.
I have not used the 35mm f/1.8 and cannot speak to its characteristics, but the above general tests should help!

Let's see more images. . .

Jehan
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 4:22 PM   #3
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Thank you for the help. I put a few more under landscape (not properly placed they should be under nature). They show some of the same issues. Clear focal point and blurry edges. These were taken outside at sunset.

I believe it is an aperature issue because I was shooting everything at 1.8-2.8
yesterday at a pretty low shutter speed. I do need a tripod (next purchase).

Maybe this is a dumb question but why would I want a f/1.8 then? Won't I always have the depth of field problem if I use the 1.8?

Thanks for the input, very helpful!!
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 5:42 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Breanna View Post
Maybe this is a dumb question but why would I want a f/1.8 then? Won't I always have the depth of field problem if I use the 1.8?

Thanks for the input, very helpful!!
Not a dumb question at all. The f/1.8 is very use full for 2 reasons:
1. To take advantage of low light situations where you can take images at a faster shutter speed (indoor sports) and also where you may want natural lighting and no flash.

2. There are times when you want to use a shallow depth of field to isolate the subject from its background. Some times it is called achieving a "bokeh" where the subject is sharp but the background is blurred. I've included a couple of examples below. DoF can be tricky to make sure you achieve the correct amount of in-focus content. I'm not sure if your D50 has a DoF preview button which you can use to check which areas of your image are in focus and which are blurred.



Last edited by Wingman; Feb 11, 2010 at 7:11 PM.
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 6:06 PM   #5
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Oh ok.
So here is a situation I need help with then. I am having a big get together this weekend and I want to take nightlife style photos. We are having a band, lighting and all that fun stuff.

I am expecting my sb600 flash to arrive today. I for some reason was under the impression that I should use my Sb600 and my new lens to get these types of shots. I don't mind setting up a tripod but I want to do some candids as well.

I think I am getting confused. I apologize for all of the questions.
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Old Feb 11, 2010, 7:19 PM   #6
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Your best option may be to bump your ISO to say, 800 which will give you the option to use an aperture less than f/1.8 for more depth of field as well as capture more light. DoF is impacted by 2 main parameters: focal length of lens, and aperture. A shorter focal lenth as well as a wide aperture creates a shallower DoF and vice-versa (usually).

For your event, you can also try using rear curtain sync for the flash mode which will enable you to capture background light as well as illuminate the subject. i.e. the shutter opens to expose for the background light, and then before the shutter closes, the flash fires to illuminate the subject. Flash techniques are an entirely different tutorial

Good luck...Jehan
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Old Feb 12, 2010, 12:05 PM   #7
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Thanks a ton. No more questions for now PROMISe =)
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