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Old Feb 5, 2004, 4:35 PM   #1
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Default Tips for photographing cats

Found this at the New York Institute of Photography's site:

http://www.nyip.com/tips/cats0204.php
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Old Feb 6, 2004, 4:54 PM   #2
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wauw what a great photo's of those students!!
If I could choise they all graduate!!!



will read it soon!
tnxs for sharing!
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Old Feb 6, 2004, 6:14 PM   #3
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Melanie, most definitely go back to the site and explore it. There's an entire series, an especially nice one, where paintings are analyzed as a way of learning better photography.
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Old Feb 6, 2004, 10:11 PM   #4
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I might have to find that article and forward it to someone I know who does both (and is revoltingly good at both... just a great natural visual talent.)

Thanks for that link, BTW. I've been trying to shoot my cat with little success. Why do I suddenly become more interesting than the toy when I have a camera in front of me? (I know, its' because I'm lying down on the ground... but still!)

Eric
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 8:58 AM   #5
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Eric, cats are quite the challenge. The last time I had my camera pointed at one, he required that I take 24 pictures before consenting to semi-settle down. I had one shot left, but I told him I had none, so he laid down sweetly on the bed. I quickly got down to his level at the foot of the bed, managing to aim and fire a split second before he leaped up and plastered himself to both my face and the camera.

One thing I've learned is to get that shutter speed cranked up as high as possible, thus putting up with a really wide aperture and the resulting shallow depth of field...unless, of course, Ms. Kitty is napping. With the fast shutter, the picture is likely to be somewhat underexposed, but this can be corrected afterward.
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 8:27 PM   #6
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Always give some fresh Catnip as payment for the shoot

Oh.......you want to slow the cat down.
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 11:39 PM   #7
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At the age my cat is (15 year or so) cat nip might just kill her!

My cat has a way of sensing the camera, I think. She'll be curled up in the sun, looking cute as ever and after I've gotten the camera and tripod setup... she'll wait up and look at me like "oh, there you are. Feed me." (which is actually a good thing.. she's been off-and-on a starvation diet since mid last year. My friends refer to her as the undead cat. Her vet actually said "Oh, is she still alive? Good to hear.")

Eric
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 6:28 AM   #8
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Peter: you shouldn't give catnip to a cat before or during a shoot. Not all cats react to the mint, but those that do become little speed demons...with emphasis on the "demon" part of things. My mother once had a cat that discovered a huge patch of the stuff growing wild. Opening the door to his let-me-in-now! meow was always an adventure. I learned to crack the door just enough to see his eyes. If his pupils were fully dilated, I closed the door in his face.

Eric: All the cats I've ever know felt it was their duty to go through periods of not eating and to thus scare their owners into feeding them pure tuna.
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 4:29 PM   #9
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I use little catnip loaded bag to get our 12 year old to show up and flop down for her twice daily injection of insullin

It is either pay up with a catnip baggie or a bite to the finger.
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Old Feb 8, 2004, 4:45 PM   #10
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Odd. I've known a number of people with diabetic cats. I wonder if it's on the rise in felines just as it seems to be in humans.
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It is either pay up with a catnip baggie or a bite to the finger.
A cat will always get its way.
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