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Old Jul 1, 2007, 10:43 AM   #21
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bahadir, as I'm a kinda short wandering Barbarian Celt, who has only seen hisbelly button in a mirror:lol:, would you be good enough to tell me what the bronze ratio is :blah:
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Old Jul 1, 2007, 11:41 AM   #22
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Ah, I feel sorry to sense some kind of resentment in your words..Hopethere's no confusion:?

My statement:
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Well,perhaps your early ancestors were also around here then, like those of Barbarian who is Celt oriented
Itis our fellow member at Steve's forums I mentioned about:Barbarian who isCelt oriented and therefore whose forefatherswere once among the peoples of Anatolia, known as Galatians ! And I intended to know if it was also the case for you...Oh, just can't believe, my dear fellow !

Btw, I haven't heard of bronze ratio, but as you know, necessity is the mother of any invention :G




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Old Jul 1, 2007, 4:35 PM   #23
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You know, i guess we were all Barbarians at sometime:-) and as for being Celtic I'm proud of that heritage so don't worry, (if i can claim that root).:lol: I like your inventiveness with the bronze ratio's pun :-)
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 2:56 AM   #24
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Very well, no confusion then : )

http://cat.une.edu.au/page/galatian%...%20settlements

Anticipating your interest relying on your awareness of your root, I simply wanted to share just a piece of info.above suggesting that Galatians (Celts) were not merely wanderers around here; )

A couple of years ago, I hada student from a village on the East of Ankara ( or Ankyra with its ancient name)with typical Galatian features ( above average height andwith blue eyes and blondhair) whotoldme abouther villagein the area populatedby people with the same features...As itis known, blue eyes and blond hair are both recessive genes against those of dark features whichappear to be dominant in the central Anatolia.

Btw,

You wrote:

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I like your inventiveness with the bronze ratio's pun :-)
Yes, I accept no excuse for inventiveness!! :-)Especially being short!! for that'sthe ratio we speak about!
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Old Jul 2, 2007, 3:41 PM   #25
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Thanks for once again sharing your photos of ancient architecture.
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Old Jul 3, 2007, 12:34 AM   #26
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ac.smith wrote:
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Thanks for once again sharing your photos of ancient architecture.
It isthekind feedbackfrom an admirer of antiquity,such as yourself, which is sooorewarding : )
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Old Jul 3, 2007, 12:42 AM   #27
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Btw, although the first planned cities appeared at Summerian city states, thefirst grid line city planning which today's modern citiesrely onalsoappeared around here thanks to the architect Hippodamus of Miletos!Ah, many a furtherexample could be added

Hmm... wasn't there a Greek philosopher who argued that city streets should be crooked and irregular, the better to confuse any invader?

Regarding the Golden section:

It works on human bodies, but it also works on things like the Nautilus and sunflowers. It can be derived from the Fibonacci sequence:

0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21...

The ratio of the last number over the second-to-last number approximates the golden section as the series approaches infinity.

It happens that body proportions are well-adapted for most efficient function. A good example is the one discovered by Benjamin Franklin. If the ratio of the humerus and the tibia were different, the beer mug would not reach our lips!

I worked as an ergonomist for a long time, and there are some very interesting mathematical facts about human proportions. If someone is interested...






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Old Jul 3, 2007, 1:43 AM   #28
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Thank you for your kind interest, Barbarian : ))

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It works on human bodies, but it also works on things like the Nautilus and sunflowers. It can be derived from the Fibonacci sequence:
You're right! The golden section could even be applied to visiting cards! So, it's no wonder a 5cm X 8cm card would look nice

Regarding theidea of that philosopher, it is rather the Romans who seems to have credited it ! But of course it was due to necessity,namely, theconstantly growing manner of their cities (some even exceeding a population of1 million!) at which such grid planning could hardly be applied!

After the reputation of the earliest planned cities here on the Aegean cost of Anatolia, even Pericles called on Hippodamus, the inventor of grid line planning, for Athens!

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I worked as an ergonomist for a long time, and there are some very interesting mathematical facts about human proportions. If someone is interested...
It would definitely beinteresting to get such information fromthe first hand experience !




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Old Jul 9, 2007, 7:19 AM   #29
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wow! those photographs bring back great memories andmakeone feel as if they are there also, standing among the tourists, admiring the ruins. I especially like the first picture of the theater, even one with no imagination can envision themselves sitting right there! In terms of the mathematics behind the architecture, I can't really add anything useful to that dialogue.:sad:Very interesting though, I learned a lot from the posts.
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Old Jul 10, 2007, 6:54 AM   #30
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Julia, how nice to read your insightful comments indicating arefined taste for antiquity,reinforced by quite a considerable imagination!

About the tourists... I sometimes watch them striving to have a decent shot, with sympathy: )Who knows, some might even be from Steve's! A badge could be useful I think :idea:
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