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Old Oct 27, 2008, 10:19 PM   #1
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Canon 20D, 1/125th at F14, ISO400
Sigma 17-70 @ 17 mm.

I live in this house.

It was built around 1710, typical New England "post and beam" construction.

The wood used to build the house may have come from the original property of 40 acres and milled at the brook just down the road on the left.

The posts and beams were "fitted" by hand off-site, then moved on site and fitted together using only dowels.

The basement was probably hand dug and line with huge stones, probably recovered from the property.

The original owner of the land was an indentured servant to the Pilgrims. After he finished his indenturing he helped survey the surrounding land and was awarded 40 acres for his service. The land would have been awarded about 1660.

The original house (prior to this one) was probably just a small 10x20 shack, however the grandson or great grandson became wealthy enough to have this house built.

The owner of the house would have had servants. We have pictures of the house from the 1800's with what looks to be a huge pile of about 10 cords of wood piled in front. With five fireplaces it would have been a lot of work to keep the place heated!

The left side alcove (you can see a small piece of it) used to be carriage way. You could pull your carriage in through double doors into a covered area where passengers and cargo could be unloaded.

Some of the original inhabitants of the house are buried in a crypt at the edge of the original property.

During World War II the house was broken up into two units (top and bottom).

The house was originally heated by wood, then coal, and now steam and hot water.

The original wiring was "knob and tube", with the whole house wired on two circuits. That has since been replaced with multiple fuse boxes and about thirty circuits!

Up to about 30 years ago the toilets would flush out over the hill in the back yard. The house now has a proper septic field.

The original house has a well built right under the kitchen.

Some of the original floor boards and wains-coating are "kings boards", which are old growth 32 inch wide boards with a tight grain and almost no knots. These boards were supposed to be shipped to England for resale but New Englanders knew how to hide the boards and keep some of the best boards for themselves.

The front of the house is painted in typical "ox blood" color which would have been cow's blood mixed with whitewash in the old days.


Some odd things found around the house include plenty of "patent medicine" bottles, a meat hook, an old chinese coin and plenty of shotgun shells.

These houses were built to last. No reason it can't stand another 300 years.
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Old Oct 28, 2008, 3:11 PM   #2
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oh wow I would LOVE to live in a place like that, great work


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