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Old Feb 17, 2004, 1:01 PM   #1
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Default Sugar & Steel




Domino Suger, taken with Sony F717, ISO 100, Photoshop adjustment layers - hard light with Gaussian blur, curves masks and curves, as well as luck.

Enjoy,

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Old Feb 17, 2004, 6:08 PM   #2
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The photo is clear enough and sharp enough that I sat here wandering across the entire structure in my mind. It reminds me of a cement factory--an unfortunate mental connection now that I think of it, but such factories have super long conveyor systems. Of course, that may not be at all what's pictured here. Can you enlighten us a little on what we're seeing?
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Old Feb 17, 2004, 8:36 PM   #3
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Default Sugar & Steel

One of Domino Sugar's plants is based in Baltimore, MD. The conveyor belts are part of the machinery used to off-load sugar from ships and barges. The view in the image is the side of the plant. Out-of-sight and to the right, are two clam shell cranes that off-load the raw sugar from the ships and barges.

When I saw the image, I recognized the tonal range available in the scene and took about 4 or 5 shots at different zoom settings, adjusting the histogram to move the luminous range to the right without "blowing out" the highlights. I like the image because of the tonal range and the different angular components working against each other.

I cropped the image to remove unwanted clutter then worked in Photoshop to bring out the tonal range. Besides desaturating the image, I made a duplicate layer, applied a Gaussian blur to the duplicate then set the mode to "hard light" and adjusted the opacity of the hard light mask. In addition, I applied a gamma curve layer to the background image. I then used a mask, and a curve layer to adjust the tonal range of the highlighted brick structure to the upper right in the image.

My goal when working in Photoshop is to perserve the bit data that comprises the image.

I am not an expert and have much to learn. I purchased the F717 about two months ago and have been on a very steep learning curve - camera and Photoshop. The visual creative process is very exciting. Although my career was in R&D chemistry, my family background is mostly artist. My brother is a professional artist but I have the techno-genes from my father and a few art-genes from my mother. Regardless, I love the creative process, especially digital imaginery.

Sorry, too much wine tonight :lol:

Click Away,

Rod
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Old Feb 18, 2004, 7:12 AM   #4
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I'm glad you decided to join us in Steve's forums. You're serious about your pleasure, and this means you'll have much to offer. For instance, you seem to have scaled that steep learning curve in Photoshop very quickly--the techniques you're using in it are not for the beginner.

Keep the photos and ideas coming, and welcome aboard!

(At least you can use wine as an excuse for verbosity. I have no excuse at all. :roll: )
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Old Feb 18, 2004, 9:19 PM   #5
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Default Thanks Barbara

Barbara:

Thanks Barbara. I looked at your website and very much liked what you are doing. You are talented and have the "art-genes."

I have been "playing" with Photoshop - basic stuff - for the last year but the steep learning curve happened this year. I have to give Michael Reichmann credit for his excellent tutorials at www.luminous-landscape.com. After visiting his website, the "light bulb" became illuminated. I have also learned techniques from other sites. My only regret about digital imagery is I will not live 100 more years. The subject is very exciting for me.

I just finished a 12 hr. day off-loading a barge (another retirement story) and I am tired, hence need to close.

Kindest Regards,

Rod
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Old Feb 18, 2004, 9:45 PM   #6
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ok first off vn photo! good composition! glad you joined steves too!

secondly.....i read something about tonal range.....wat do you mean by that (lol stupid me ) is it the contrast of the picture? cuz i read in Outdoor Photographer about using (photoshop i think?) and raw images to "increase tonal range"?
thanks for any help.......
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Old Feb 19, 2004, 6:50 AM   #7
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Vito, tonal range refers to the number of values in a scale that stretches between black and white. The shortest range would have just two values: black and white. Stick a middle gray between the two, and you've increased the range. Put two more grays in there, one that's between middle gray and black and the other between middle gray and white, and you've once again increased the tonal range. The greater the number of grays between black and white, the wider the tonal range. You'll find that very high contrast pictures have a shorter tonal range, so don't think of this smaller range as necessarily a bad thing. It's a description, not a negative criticism.

To really get a grip on the concept, see if you can find an explanation of the Zone System. My morning coffee hasn't kicked in yet, so I'm too lazy to Google it for you.
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Old Feb 19, 2004, 8:36 AM   #8
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ok thanks
this kinda goes hand and hand with contrast? sort of lol
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Old Feb 20, 2004, 7:07 AM   #9
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The image is no doubt intersting and I wish you welcome aboard as well.

I like those industrial buildings and the bw is a good choice, as well as good is the work you have done with tonal range.

Some hints :
You can notice some slanted vertical lines on the left side ( while the right one is ok ).
So , no rotation will fix the problem.

Just select all, Trasform\Distort and click (and hold) the left-bottom grip while moving the mouse : this will help you find out a good deformation that will restore the vertical parts in that area.
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Old Feb 20, 2004, 12:00 PM   #10
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Default Thanks for >transformation/distort tip

I just tried the >Transformation>Distort - WOW very nice. Thank you for the technique and thanks for the kind words.

I do not have much time on my hands these days but my experience at this forum has been wonderful and I feel welcome.

I briefly looked at your website. Indeed, I am a grasshopper on a small lilly pad in the great universe of the photographic pond. Your work is great. I will spend a little more time at the site later.

Best Regards,

Rod
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