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Old Sep 14, 2006, 2:45 AM   #1
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I know it varies but on average how many pictures do u get out of a pair of AA's? Also why is it that most of the cameras with more zoom such as H5, H2, S3IS all have AA's? Why is it rare to find a better camera like that w/ a lithium battery?

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"For those who have used an H2, H5 etc....How many pics do u get on a single pair of batteries?
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Old Sep 14, 2006, 11:23 AM   #2
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Personally I would rather have AA battery compaired to a special Li-Ion battery, that is one of the main reason why I bought Pentax dSLR because it is the only dSLR that use AA battery. I use a 2500mah battery and get over 500 shots per charge no problem. The camera use 4xAA battery and I bought a pack of 8xAA 2500mah battery and a charger for only $25. You cant do that with a Li-Ion battery, most battery cost $60+ each.

Also you have the advantage of picking a fully charge AA battery almost anywhere you go for temp use if you forget to charge your battery.

The biggest problem with AA battery is if you use alkaline battery for everyday use. YOU WILL drain them out quickly and go through many of them.

The only drawback with AA battery is that a typically set of AA battery is bigger and heavier then a typical Li-Ion battery. But as far as battery life, you should get about the same power a Li-Ion battery vs a GOOD AA rechargable battery.
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Old Sep 14, 2006, 2:15 PM   #3
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Lithium-ion technology is in many ways superior to nickle based rechargeables. They have significantly higher energy density, almost no self-discharge, and can be recharged frequently (no need to fully discharge) without loss of performance or life. They also don't require any periodic cylcling to extend battery life.

They do, however, require a saftey circuit designed into the battery or device to keep voltages within required ranges during charge and discharge. Apparently this has been one hurdle--so far--in preventing the development of Lithium-ion rechargeable AA batteries. If a Lithium-ion battery were capable of being put into a device or charger not designed for it, it could potentially ignite. Also, Lithium-ion batteries naturally operate at around 3.7 volts per cell, so the technology is not suited to developing a 1.5 volt cell. There are however, disposable Lithium AA batteries (not Lithium-ion) available which are very long lasting, and expensive.

The advantages of Lithium-ion rechargeables are greater in smaller devices, like small compact cameras. Most of these will use these batteries, as getting more power out of a smaller battery is important in keeping the size of the device down. A Lithium-ion rechargeable for $30 which can be recharged in camera is generally more convenient than 2 AA batteries which make the device bulkier, don't maintain their charge, and have to be removed to be recharged in a seperate charger.

In a larger super zoom, there is less of an advantage, as many people won't care about the additional size and weight of a few AAA batteries. Plus, consumers are more familiar with and comfortable with the standard AA batteries.

So really, manufacturers are responding to demand. In smaller cameras, demand for the smaller size, convenience, and good battery life and performance leads to more sales of cameras with Lithium-ion batteries. In larger consumer compacts, consumer preference for AA may be stronger than noticeable performance benfits. I'm not sure with regard to DSLRs, but consumers there may be less sensitive to the small additional initial cost of Li-ion.

But, even if they can't do Lithium-ion AA, it would be nice if the manufacturers could at least agree on a new standard battery. It would lower costs more quickly and there would be less reason to worry about batteries possibly no longer being available 5 or 10 years down the road.

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Old Sep 14, 2006, 11:39 PM   #4
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^^^Good read...So if I'm understanding right...More customers prefer the AA's in the super zoom cameras as opposed to Li-ions? Seems like every1 I talk to love the H2's the H5's but hesitate to buy them due to the AA batteries. I just don't see why it is rare to find more cameras like Panasonic's TZ1 or Kodak's P850 that have a big zoom & Li-ion battery....I understand what you are saying with the fact that most of the super zoom cameras are gonna be bigger in size so AA's may seem more of a natural fit....But on average how many pictures do you predict to get in a H2 for example...With using Nimh 2500ma? Juston average...
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Old Sep 15, 2006, 11:00 AM   #5
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Wellusing the H1, which has a larger screen than the H2 with a set of properly conditioned 2700mAh batteries I was able to take 289 shots with the battery indicator at 1/3 when I finished shooting.

Another test I did with the H1 was with 2500mAh batteries( I think, over a year ago might have been 2600.. ).

In a dark room, excepting a 17iin computer monitor behind me, I set the flash to the highest level, lcd on full time, focus helper light set to on, took a picture at wide, zoomed to full zoom, zoomed back to wide, waited for flash to recycle and repeated.

At 70 flash pictures/zoom in/zoom out cycles the battery was still showing full charge.

No need to worry about batteries with the H2 or H5, even with the massive 3in screen on the H5 you should be getting200-250+shots per set of two batteries assuming a reasonable 2700 or 2900 rating.

Use the evf and that should hit over 300 !

Considering the Canon S3 uses 4 batteries you could easily carry 2 spares for theH5 and easily beat the number of shots the S3 can manage even though it uses a tiny screen in comparison.




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Old Sep 16, 2006, 2:54 AM   #6
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Sintares wrote:
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Wellusing the H1, which has a larger screen than the H2 with a set of properly conditioned 2700mAh batteries I was able to take 289 shots with the battery indicator at 1/3 when I finished shooting.

Another test I did with the H1 was with 2500mAh batteries( I think, over a year ago might have been 2600.. ).

In a dark room, excepting a 17iin computer monitor behind me, I set the flash to the highest level, lcd on full time, focus helper light set to on, took a picture at wide, zoomed to full zoom, zoomed back to wide, waited for flash to recycle and repeated.

At 70 flash pictures/zoom in/zoom out cycles the battery was still showing full charge.

No need to worry about batteries with the H2 or H5, even with the massive 3in screen on the H5 you should be getting200-250+shots per set of two batteries assuming a reasonable 2700 or 2900 rating.

Use the evf and that should hit over 300 !

Considering the Canon S3 uses 4 batteries you could easily carry 2 spares for theH5 and easily beat the number of shots the S3 can manage even though it uses a tiny screen in comparison.



Nice to know...Do you know off hand what milli-amp the batteries the Sony H2 comes with? I know it comes with 2 rechargable Sony Nimh as well as charger but not sure of the power of them....I always assumed that the H2 & especially theH5 would get roughly 50 pictures taken due to the AA batteries. Good to know that even with zooming & flash you were able to get 200+ pictures...Thx for the info...I just need to find the milli-amps the Sony H2 & H5 comes with...
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Old Oct 23, 2006, 12:28 AM   #7
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Hi everyone,

For several years I have been borrowing my neighbor's Gateway DC-T50. It is the same as one of the Toshiba models with Gateway branding.

The proprietary battery died on the way to an event. When I got back, I had to search around, order a replacement and wait a week.

After I charged the new battery, I turned the camera on to test it before I gave it back to my neighbor. The battery strength "bars" seemed to be just as inaccurate as with the old battery (never very accurate).

Maybe his old and new both needed to be charged and discharged a few times before the camera would display remaining strength correctly. I don't know. But the inaccuracy (and having to order) left a bad image in my mind.

I don't know how much life remains with NiMH either, but reading other people's stories, I will get good life. Plus NiMH and lithium and alkaline are available almost everywhere, and proprietary batteries may take two weeks to arrive.

Now that I've had a Canon A540 for a week (uses 2 AA, returned it after a week) I believe the S3 will work well (4 AA).

(To be fair though, the proprietary battery in my Nokia 2600 prepaid cell phone works well and the "bars" go down gradually -- no surprises.)

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Old Oct 24, 2006, 6:55 AM   #8
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With 4 AAs, you'll also get much quicker flash recycle time compared to 2 AAs. I have a Minolta DiMage Z1 (4 AAs) and a Canon A410 (2 AAs), and after a full-blow flash, the DiMage is ready again after about 3 seconds while the Canon takes at least 10.

That said, I get roughly equal battery life from both. The DiMage has a 10x zoom and the Canon's is only 3.2x (less motion to power), and the Canon has a more efficient chip. Still, I can get between 200 and 400 shots on one set with the DiMage, and that's with 1800 mAh cells.

My younger brother has a Kodak Z7590. If we're out shooting and our batteries go dead, I can go to a drugstore and get a set of Energizer E2 Lithiums and go shoot some more. He would have to go home and plug in for a while. I like AAs mainly for that reason.
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Old Oct 26, 2006, 2:23 AM   #9
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kenbalbari wrote:
Quote:
Lithium-ion technology is in many ways superior to nickle based rechargeables. They have significantly higher energy density, almost no self-discharge, and can be recharged frequently (no need to fully discharge) without loss of performance or life. They also don't require any periodic cylcling to extend battery life.

They do, however, require a saftey circuit designed into the battery or device to keep voltages within required ranges during charge and discharge. Apparently this has been one hurdle--so far--in preventing the development of Lithium-ion rechargeable AA batteries. If a Lithium-ion battery were capable of being put into a device or charger not designed for it, it could potentially ignite. Also, Lithium-ion batteries naturally operate at around 3.7 volts per cell, so the technology is not suited to developing a 1.5 volt cell. There are however, disposable Lithium AA batteries (not Lithium-ion) available which are very long lasting, and expensive.

The advantages of Lithium-ion rechargeables are greater in smaller devices, like small compact cameras. Most of these will use these batteries, as getting more power out of a smaller battery is important in keeping the size of the device down. A Lithium-ion rechargeable for $30 which can be recharged in camera is generally more convenient than 2 AA batteries which make the device bulkier, don't maintain their charge, and have to be removed to be recharged in a seperate charger.

In a larger super zoom, there is less of an advantage, as many people won't care about the additional size and weight of a few AAA batteries. Plus, consumers are more familiar with and comfortable with the standard AA batteries.

So really, manufacturers are responding to demand. In smaller cameras, demand for the smaller size, convenience, and good battery life and performance leads to more sales of cameras with Lithium-ion batteries. In larger consumer compacts, consumer preference for AA may be stronger than noticeable performance benfits. I'm not sure with regard to DSLRs, but consumers there may be less sensitive to the small additional initial cost of Li-ion.

But, even if they can't do Lithium-ion AA, it would be nice if the manufacturers could at least agree on a new standard battery. It would lower costs more quickly and there would be less reason to worry about batteries possibly no longer being available 5 or 10 years down the road.
That is so true my big worry li-Ion should be standard type like AAs , i want to be able to use if i choose my cameras 20 years from now or more just like my older film cameras i still use , Take panasonic they changed the battery slightly from the fz 1 2,3,5,10, 20 ,when they brought out the latestfz 7 , 30. 50 ,I believe the older battery will not be available as long as the latest new cameras battery,so do i sell my fz 2 /20 to the latest models so i have a better chance of finding a replacement battery in future years?, I bet they change the battery yet again in a few years and some of us worry again about availability ofour fz 20 / 5 ect older cams power ,, same thing with fuji f 10 / 11 great long life battery much praised , now theve gone and changed the battery again for the replacement cult cameras ie f 20 / f 30 why ?. so a reason again to buy the new model ,as the f 10/ f11 battery was unique as far as im aware to just those two cameras only approximatelty on the market 18 months , what availability for those in 10 years? also li- ion batteries have a limited shelf life used or not and there is NO date stamp on them could have been sitting on a dealers shelf for years and nearly useless. I think this li-ion battery issue is anouther camera makers tool to ensure we change our cameras a bit more than we might they should indeed be standard like AAs maybe small medium and large for the different sizes of camera not rocket science is it .

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