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Old May 25, 2007, 1:21 PM   #1
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A friend of mine has bought AA rechargeable batteries claiming a very low self-discharge rate, in a budget store (Wilkinson) here in the U.K. I thought initially they must just be alkaline rechargeables, but I found the following website, and these are in fact'Uniross Hybrio' cells. He's been using them in his flashgun and various other gadgets since Xmas, but hasn't tried them in a camera.

Has anyone seen or used them, especially for digicams? Anyone know how they work? They claim to be rechargeable in any Ni-MH charger........

http://www.batterylogic.co.uk/hybrio.htm

They say "The HYBRIO battery has an extremely slow self discharge rate which allows it to remain charged up for much longer, even when not used for very long periods. "

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Old May 26, 2007, 2:28 PM   #2
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Hello Alan,

I believe these are similar to the RayOVac Hybrid cells. I have just started testing the Hybrid cells, so it's too early to know how well they will hold up.

At 30 days, they have less self discharge than normal NiMh cells, but a little more than the Sanyo Eneloop cells do.

Tom
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Old May 28, 2007, 2:03 PM   #3
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I posted some info on Hybrios last December...........
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...hlight=hybrios

They've worked flawlessly in the 6 months since, they just never seem to go flat. Not true of course, it just seems like it as they're so easy to live with.
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Old Jun 3, 2007, 12:22 AM   #4
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Thanks, SteveB.

What do you use as the '3R' load for your discharge test?

Have you any idea about the chemistry involved? How do they prevent the usual Ni-MH self-discharge? I assume the term 'hybrid' means there's another cell or cell component inside the case, somehow keeping up the charge of the Ni-MH, or otherwise deterring it from discharging.

I've emailed a query to Isidor Buchmann of 'Battery University' ( http://www.batteryuniversity.com/index.htm ), to ask him whether he knows, but haven't had a reply as yet.

I have now bought a set of 4 Hybrios (with an unwanted 2-cell charger)for ukĀ£9.99 at Wilkinson. They're the same price without the charger at Maplin.They're for backing up myseldom used Casio QV-5700 , the only camera I have with an external flash socket. I'll probably get more for my son's and my daughter's little-used digicams as well.

Thanks again for your help,

Alan T

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Old Jun 4, 2007, 1:25 PM   #5
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Alan T wrote:
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Thanks, SteveB.

What do you use as the '3R' load for your discharge test?

Have you any idea about the chemistry involved? How do they prevent the usual Ni-MH self-discharge? I assume the term 'hybrid' means there's another cell or cell component inside the case, somehow keeping up the charge of the Ni-MH, or otherwise deterring it from discharging.

Alan T
"
I used a 6 watt 3 ohm resistor soldered across a cleaned up AA battery holder/connector taken from an old radio. Any voltage readings were taken directly at the battery terminals as contacts always lose a few millivolts/tens of millivolts that can vary.

As far as chemistry, I remember reading some info on Sanyo's site a while ago about their Eneloops (same type of battery), I think it was basically the same chemistry just higher quality construction.
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Old Jun 4, 2007, 1:28 PM   #6
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I see that the 'Quote' option still has bugs. It never lets me type where I want (in Firefox anyway).
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Old Jun 4, 2007, 3:18 PM   #7
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SteveB wrote:
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I used a 6 watt 3 ohm resistor ..........basically the same chemistry just higher quality
I did realise 3R means 3ohms, but couldn't believe these little things were passing 1/3 of an amp for 3 hours! I should have done my mental arithmetic. Suddenly I now realise what a lot of pressurised electrons our little gadgets are letting out when we open the tap.

And I still wonder what's 'hybrid' about the technology, then. A hybrid of using them for a while and not using them for a while, I suppose.

Thanks,

Alan T

PS SteveB wrote:
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.....'Quote'.....never lets me type where I want ........
I find slow, copious & creative use of delete and cut&paste is necessary to say what I want!

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Old Jun 5, 2007, 6:25 AM   #8
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Alan T wrote:
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... I still wonder what's 'hybrid' about the technology, then. A hybrid of using them for a while and not using them for a while, I suppose....
I've got it now - read this on Maplin's web site -

"Simultaneously offers disposable battery and rechargeable battery strong points Ready for use just as a disposable battery Rechargeable, economical and eco-friendly The equivalent of 500 disposable batteries Can be recharged in any NiMH battery ..."

So it's 'hybrid' applications, and "strong points", not hybrid technology. I'd call that "multiple", not "hybrid". Isn't market-speak wonderful?

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