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Old Sep 5, 2007, 8:14 AM   #1
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I am looking for the highest power AAs rechargeables (nickle metal hydrides are what I have used in the past) to power a Sunpack hot shoe flash that I plan to use at a wedding and special dinner in the coming months. I may need as many as 300 shots with flash...... Also the batteries would used a Fuji S-9100 camera as well.

I have been usinga combination of energizers, CTA and impact batteries over the past years (energizers 2100mha and 2300mhaCTA range from 2500mha )and most of the batteries exceot the Impact brand (2 sets of 2700mha) are starting to show signs that they are not properly charging due to high usage. I believe most of those batteries are at least a year to as much as 3 years old. I tend to charge every set of batteries I have at least every 14 days.

I found the bhphotovideo carries Impact brand 2900mha Rechargeable AAs in packs of 4 and 10. But haven't foiund anyone else with anything over 2700mha. Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated.

I would like to get a total of 12 or 16 cells in all. I've also looked at battery packs that ount on a belt to power the flash but the mha rating ratings leads me to believe I'd need more than one of those expensive packs to do the job. But then again I am new at using hot shoe flash -- only been using one since May of this year since my older camera did not have a slot for one.

What are good battery sites to look at on the net that would carry such a product.

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

dave
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 11:30 AM   #2
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Hello Dave,

In the battery world there are those that manufacturer and sell batteries, and those that buy batteries from the manufacturer, re-label them, then sell them.

The battery manufacturers have data sheets for their batteries that show their performance under different loads and most also show minimum capacities. The capacity of a cell is determined using a "standard charge" and a "standard discharge." Unfortunately, almost nothing batteries are used in discharge at the same rate of the "standard discharge," so a larger labeled capacity does not always translate into longer runtime.

Those who re-label batteries are often playing marketing games. They believe the unsuspecting consumer will tend to purchase the highest number, regardless of performance. It is not unusual to find that a cell that is labeled 2400 mAh testing out to only 2200 mAh, or one that is labeled 2700 - 2900 mAh testing out to only 2500 mAh.

Without performance data, you really don't know what you have. A good source of this data is from the manufacturers data sheet. Then you move on to testing. If the data sheet is not available, you move directly to testing. It is important to test you equipment before you need to rely on it.

I would suggest that you study up as much as you can, then go in steps. Purchase a set of batteries, test them out, and see if they work in your application. If the do, then pick up a whole batch of the same cells. If the don't move on to another brand and test them out.

If you are strictly looking for a large labeled capacity cell, I believe there are some 3500 mAh cells available on eBay, however they only test out to around 2000 mAh... :-)

Tom
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Old Sep 5, 2007, 9:08 PM   #3
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Photo 5 wrote:
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I believe most of those batteries are at least a year to as much as 3 years old. I tend to charge every set of batteries I have at least every 14 days.
You are probably experiencing a fall-off in capacity by now. As the literature says, NiMH cells can be recharged up to 500 times. What it doesn't mention, is that, depending on cell design, the capacity can begin falling off after 50-100 charging cycles. It is also a good idea to match the cells you have in sets, by voltage, as capacities vary a bit between cells, and the weakest cell in a set determines the number of shots you can get. This probably isn't strictly necessary for most people, but you sond as if you want to get the most from your batteries.

brian

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Old Sep 13, 2007, 7:25 AM   #4
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I am basically looking for the most strength I can get out of a set of AAs because they will be used in a hot shoe flash (Sunpack 383) and want them to last as long as possible (so I can carry as few swts as possible). I have thought about any external power pack but it looks like I might need two battery cells in order to get me through an entire wedding shot. Several repuable people suggested 2900mha batteries and so far bhphotovideo is the only source I have found....

Hey woouldn;t be nive is someone made an external pack for flashes that had 5 to 6000mha life.......

Anyway thnaks for all the info so far you people here are the best of any forum I have ever been on.

dave
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Old Oct 12, 2007, 7:04 AM   #5
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Check out the Thomas Distributing websitehttp://www.thomas-distributing.com

They have lots of the most current high-capacity rechargeables at prices that are very competitive. I'm getting ready to pull the trigger on some batteries and a charger myself.

Good Luck.
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Old Oct 14, 2007, 6:58 AM   #6
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It may sound strange, but I'd suggest dropping this highest capacity alltogether. As Silverfox has already explained, nameplate capacity is one thing and real-life capacity something different. Also, talking about power, you are more interested in cells with lower internal resistance than in cells with the highest capacity. Lower internal resistance cells can supply higher voltage under high current draws, exactly the situation in a hotshoe flash. In your situation it would mean that the total number of shots will be slightly reduced but your flash recharge times will be shortened. I always prefer to work with cells that give me shortest recycle times on a flash. If the total number of shots is not enough, just get another set. There is nothing more frustrating to lose a moment because your flash was charging.



I'd suggest you get Sanyo Eneloop cells. These are only 2000 mAh, but they have some advantages. First, they are Low Self-Discharge (LSD) cells. This means that they can be left in your flash for several months and still retain 90% of their juice. Second, as extensive testing has confirmed, they behave very well under loads of 1-1-2 Amps typically encountered during flash recharging.
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Old Oct 15, 2007, 9:04 PM   #7
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Photo 5 wrote:
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I am looking for the highest power AAs rechargeables (nickle metal hydrides are what I have used in the past) to power a Sunpack hot shoe flash that I plan to use at a wedding and special dinner in the coming months. I may need as many as 300 shots with flash...... Also the batteries would used a Fuji S-9100 camera as well.

...

dave
We had a customer who bought batteries for her flash, to do a weddng. Her flash user manual said to expect 150 shots from a set of 2000mAh AA's. Based on that advice she bought 5 sets of Maha Powerex 2700's. She took over 1000 photos using the flash and was thrilled to never have to change the batteries!

You can read her comment at http://servaas.com.au/maha-powerex-2...?reviews_id=11

As others have mentioned, there is more to batteres than the number on the outside, just like there is more to a camera than the number of magapixels. Charge retention, internal resistance, and build quality all make a difference to the performance. Some battereies will only have half their capacity after being used 20 times. While some brands offer a 6 month warranty on their AA batteries, Maha offer a 5 year warranty.
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Old Oct 16, 2007, 6:23 AM   #8
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I second the recommendation for Maha Powerex 2700 mAh cells, they're very good cells with a low self-discharge rate.
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Old Oct 16, 2007, 10:36 PM   #9
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Thats an interestingrecommendation because several peoprle who are pro photographers in my area told me anything but that brand. One guy claims ater 6 months of heavy use they don't recharge. Anyway I have never used them myself so I can say if they are correct or not but 5 of thr 10 people I asked said not to use that brand.

I ended up with impact 2900mha cells from bhphotoviudeo.com

dave
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Old Oct 17, 2007, 12:08 AM   #10
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Photo 5 wrote:
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Thats an interestingrecommendation because several peoprle who are pro photographers in my area told me anything but that brand. One guy claims ater 6 months of heavy use they don't recharge. Anyway I have never used them myself so I can say if they are correct or not but 5 of thr 10 people I asked said not to use that brand...
I've never heard or read that on any forums.

I have meny happy photography cusomers in Australia that make repeat purchases o Maha Powerex batteries, and there are plenty of people recommending them on this forum and others.
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