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Old Jun 17, 2008, 10:20 AM   #1
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I am sure that the relevant info is somewhere out there, but there is too much to find my way



Basically; for my pentax k100d super i need rechargeable AAs, questions

1) Do I go for high capacity NIMh? Any specific ones Picked up somewhere that these type could be somehow damaged in digital camera when somehow it gets "reversely charged" when used whilst nearly empty (I honestly do not know what i am on about here, anybody)

2) Are these eneloops better suited? There is less capacity in them, and the fact that they hold their charge longer does not bother me.

3)Chargers; need one which is suitable when voltage from grid is less reliable (africa) or doesn't that make any difference anyway? Understand that too rapid a charge isn't good for it, however handy, what would I go for?

4) could the wrong battery damage my camera, and what would constitute a wrong battery. Or am I ok with any AA



(ps, my backup is going to be some high capacity, but none rechargeable lithium batteries from energiser. They promise me 630 images out of 2 batteries, which of course i am taking with a pinch of salt)



thank you
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Old Jun 17, 2008, 11:19 AM   #2
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I've gone to eneloops for most of my needs, always having a charge is much more important than total available power.


Most chargers should handle this without a problem. If you are really worried, charge your batteries in the car if you have access using a cigarette adapter (check voltage's before ordering). 1 other option I use sometimes when traveling extrememly light is a USB battery charger, only holds 2 batteries, but by using 2 sets for the camera, I don't run into problems. The USB can either use a computer, or a plug adapter that I also use for my iPod and phone.

Dont mix your batteries, either they need to be all the same ex. all NiMh, all Alkaline. If you are using NiMh, it is recommended they all have the same charge and are in similar lifecycle points. For my cameras, I have 2 sets of dedicated Eneloops for each camera. Same with Flash, 2 sets. I dont mix and match between sets.

HTH

John
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Old Jun 19, 2008, 6:47 PM   #3
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Hello Wittetulp,

Your shooting style usually dictates what batteries will work best for you. If you go through a set of batteries in a week or less, you should consider high capacity batteries. On the other hand, if you go through a set of batteries in a year, the Eneloop cells would be the way to go.

The Eneloop cells are great cells. There are a variety of other low self discharge cells, and they also seem to be working out well.

You should probably have a charger that can use both household current and also charge off of a 12 volt battery. The Maha C9000 is a great charger and offers a lot of "features" as well.

The Energizer lithium batteries are a great backup to have.

Tom
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Old Jun 27, 2008, 10:32 AM   #4
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looking around i see there are chargers with a charging time from anything from 15 min to up to 8 hours per charge. Why go for a 8 hour charger if 15 min is enough??
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Old Jun 30, 2008, 7:00 PM   #5
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Hello Wittetulp,

The amount of time it takes to charge is dependent on the charging rate. The charging rate offered by the charger is dependent on the method used to determine when to stop charging.

The most common method of charge termination is called -dV. At the end of the charge, the voltage will drop a small amount indicating that the cell is fully charged. In order to get a reliable end of charge signal, the battery manufacturers recommend charging at a rate where the charge is completed in 1 - 2 hours.

If your charger uses another method of ending the charge, you can get by with slower charge rates, however, when you charge a cell in under an hour, you do damage to the cell and will end up with fewer charge/discharge cycles.

For example, the Eneloop cells claim 1000 charge/discharge cycles. I ran a test on some Eneloop cells charging them in an Energizer 15 minute charger. The cells did well for 100 cycles, then started to drop off in performance. At 125 cycles they were starting to have problems. They did make it to 150 cycles, but just barely. In this case, 15 minute charging worked well for about 125 cycles, but the cell was unable to perform after 150 cycles. If you were hopping for 1000 cycles, you would be disappointed.

On the other hand, if you are in a position where waiting around for cells to finish charging is costing you money, you may find the reduced cycle life a worthwhile trade off for having the cells ready to be used rapidly.

Tom
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 10:54 AM   #6
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thanks, bought myself some enneloop type batteries today following all this advice
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Old Jul 4, 2008, 4:58 AM   #7
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The best way to protect against polarity reversal is to use cells that are well matched and charged and used together.

Stop using once you get a low battery notice and recharge.


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Old Jul 7, 2008, 4:40 AM   #8
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i'll do that, thank you



(ps; doesn't that shorten their life; i.e recharging before completely empty, or doesn't that apply here??)
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Old Jul 13, 2008, 6:05 AM   #9
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wittetulp wrote:
Quote:
i'll do that, thank you



(ps; doesn't that shorten their life; i.e recharging before completely empty, or doesn't that apply here??)
When "low battery" comes on, one or more cells is usually very near being completely empty. If you have a three state indicator, which is common (red flash, med and flash) the low isn't until you get flashing indicator saying low batt.

Repeated charging such as taking ten pictures, then putting them on charger to "top off" on regular basis is bad, but it's ok to recharge without COMPLETELY discharging.


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Old Aug 5, 2008, 10:31 AM   #10
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in the end nver used the rechargeables as i managed the whole trip on 2 sets of 4 lithium (energiser) batteries. Close to 2000 images, using lots of flash and frequent "reviews" on screen. Incredible performance!!
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