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Old Jul 3, 2006, 6:07 PM   #21
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There's a slight difference between buying something you know to be generic and buying one you think is going to be genuine. Selling me a fake and telling me it's genuine is fraud. Now as for the battery itself rather than the act of selling...

Thecoutnerfeit is made by an unknown company without any proof that the standards that they adhere to will prevent damage to your camera or to your wellbeing.

As for the generic battery being fine....it could be fine now and it could be fine 2 years from now...or it could overheat and damage your camera in 6 months or 1 year or 2 years from now. There's no recourse if it does. There's no company to go back to and say, "Hey, your battery just killed my camera." We're not talking about performance, we're talking about safety standards.

If I were to buy a non-Canon battery, I'd stick with a well known company and not some no-name brand. A lot of those no-name brands are sold on the streets in China for pocket change. I'm not putting one of those in my $1000 camera.


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Old Jul 7, 2006, 12:31 PM   #22
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I must admit I didn't think things through that much before... I wanted to post partly to clarify what issues might exist, so thanks for that.

pxlbarrel wrote:
Quote:
As for the generic battery being fine....it could be fine now and it could be fine 2 years from now...or it could overheat and damage your camera in 6 months or 1 year or 2 years from now. There's no recourse if it does. There's no company to go back to and say, "Hey, your battery just killed my camera." We're not talking about performance, we're talking about safety standards.
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Old Jul 17, 2006, 3:55 PM   #23
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Use an ohmmeter and measure the resistance between "-" and "T". Compare the readings between the suspect and genuine battery.

Throw them both in the fridge. Do the same about an hour later.
If they do not exhibit similar characteristics, then, it is definitely not genuine. This is a temperature monitoring output used by the charger and/or camera to ensure charging/discharging is halted if it reaches hazardous conditions.

I got stuck with a fake NB-4L from eBay too and although Canon did offer to let me send it in and check the authenticity, they didn't promise a working replacement, so I was like screw that. In my case, the battery's temperature sensor was substituted with a 1 k ohm fixed resistor to emulate "room temperature" conditions. This will trick the charger/camera, but if battery somehow overheats, the charger/camera will not know about it and keep pushing current through it, which _could_ cause the battery to go boom!

Unikely, but it sucks if it does.




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Old Oct 4, 2006, 5:54 AM   #24
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Hi all, I joined simply so I could add to this thread.

Well guess what, I've been suckered too by "Genuine Canon Batteries" for sale on Ebay.

I have purchased two BP511A's from two different sellers only to find out they are both fake's.

I don't know about the US cost of a genuine Canon battery but over here in the UK they are the equivalent of $110. Which is a tad expensive for my liking. (We get ripped off for everything in the UK).

From researching the problem on the web I have the following tips for buyers:

Check the Canon hologram:

A genuine hologram will turn green when tilted horizontally (left to right) a fake one will remain gold.

Please refer to the below guide for pictures (my thanks go to its author)

http://reviews.ebay.co.uk/Counterfei...00000001874268

If the word Canon had been printed onto the front of the battery the Printing will remain regular at the top of the C of the word Canon. Fakes will have blurred less consitant printing at this point.

For some reason I can't find this info on the Canon eu site so I'm referring you to the Indian page which has a comparison pictures you may find useful:

http://www.canon.co.in/consumables/C...tBatteries.asp

Lastly check the back of the battery, read the English instructions on the lower blue label, fakes may contain the mispelt word "Exckusive" rather than "Exclusive".

I actually live near the Canon UK head office so I am very tempted to get the latest info for everyone on the current situation of counterfeits in circulation.

I will update everyone when I know more.
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Old Oct 4, 2006, 6:13 AM   #25
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Sorry to hear you got suckered too. My con man changed his location to Hong Kong (from Vancouver) and has changed his Ebay name yet again (third name in 1 year). He branched out into selling hard drives too. He hasn't placed anything up for auction for a while now. I wonder if he high tailed it to Hong Kong because it was getting too hot for him in Canada. (One can dream, eh?)

I actually put up a webpage with photos with the differences between a real battery and a fake. It's the same photos as the photobucket photos I put up but with some more description.

http://www.chrismak.com/ebay_images/counterfeit.htm
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