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Old Apr 12, 2003, 8:39 PM   #1
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Default Why can't I use NiCd's ?

I am about to buy the Fuji S2 Pro and I am wondering why the manual doesn't allow to use NicD batteries? Are there any differences in voltage (there shouldn't, it's a standard after all)? Are differences in performance? What is the reason for forbidding NiCds?

My other question is how sensitive are cameras to voltage changes, especially the S2? Batteries have different voltages when fully charged and when they are about to give up, yet manufacturers say about using only specific batteries or about using only their chargers, AC adaptors etc... Will I damage the camera if I use a third party AC adaptor or other batteries. These questions are the direct result of reading the article how a guy from Toronto made a battery pack for his Olympus. I am also planning on making a battery pack for my camera (replacing AA cells with C cells). My idea is to screw the battery packe under the camera (tripod socket), this way I have no cables around. Can I do it without fear? Or should I stick to AA cells, otherwise I will damage the S2 camera...
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Old Apr 12, 2003, 8:57 PM   #2
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Wouldn't it be easier and more convenient to just to use rechargeable NiMh AA? They put out lot more current than conventional battery and are now available as high as 2100mAh... 8)
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... I believe the caution on NiCad is for chemical leaking prevention. Shorting NiCad is not a good idea, and digital camera tend to s_uck a lot of current initially, and would look just like a short @ its terminals for short periods! ops:

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Old Apr 12, 2003, 9:09 PM   #3
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Well, I am definitely going to use the NiMh. My question is posted because whenever someone says 'no' I always ask 'why'. And what about the AC adaptors and battery mods? Will the camera survive it?
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Old Apr 12, 2003, 9:17 PM   #4
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All electronic devices have internal regulator to allow them to work with fluctuating batteries as they depleted or AC adapter... Just don't exceed the external voltage too much since this internal regulator has to work slighly harder and dissipate as heat (for linear device).

Most cameras however have switching regulator which is more efficient than a linear regulator, and the camera actually runs cooler with higher voltage (ie switch 'off' more often), as the batteries voltage decreases this regulator has to switch 'on' its duty cycle more often (ie the battery grip or heat sink get warmer) 8)
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Old Apr 15, 2003, 6:49 PM   #5
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For all electrical reasons, except the environmental ones, NiCads and NiMh can be regarded the same. However NiMh do come in higher power per volume ratio now, compared to NiCad. BUT NiCad has less self disharge over time. The chargers for both have slightly different characteristics, although most universal chargers have a NiMh/Nicad switch.

It seems your problem is you want an external battery pack. Well fill up your boots with 'C' or 'D' Cell NiCads if that's what you can get. 4 of these should be OK but DON'T wire in parallel to up the current - oh and I'd fit a fuse: 1 to 2 amp. If you look at the peak current output of a rechargeable 'D' cell compared to the Alkaline AA - or even the Nimh - there's no contest. It'll be like having a power house under your tripod! Think about the charger though. The advantage of using the same AA format is all batts are common and fit the charger.

However, you'll soon have the need like me to build your own fast charger for 12 to 16 AA cells in groups of 4.
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Old May 19, 2003, 6:14 AM   #6
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I recently bought a Sony P31 digital camera. There was two NiMH rechargeable batteries with charger. Since I was eager to use it before the batteries are charged, I just bought two ordinary AA size batteries and put in the camera. To my surprise, the camera would just turn OFF immediately after I switch it ON. First I thought the problem may be with the camera. Then I read the manual and it stated "Only NiMH batteries are to be used. Alkaline batteries may also be used, but the display of battery life may not be accurate." I then bought two alkaline batteries and it worked fine. Then I realized, there may be some circuit which is sensitive to the current from batteries. Based on my experience, I would also like to suggest that it is always better to read the manual before starting to use the camera.
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